PowerBooks and Airline Power: A Mystery

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Date: Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 23:05
Category: Archive

Why does my PowerBook freak out whenever it is plugged into the in-seat power outlet on a commercial flight? Read more…

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Munch on Your Laptop This Christmas

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Date: Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 09:09
Category: Archive

Say hello to iGingerBread.

iGingerbread
(Thanks Gizmodo).
Merry Christmas from the PowerPage.

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Stream Anything to Your AirPort Express with Slipstream

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Date: Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 09:15
Category: Archive

Rogue Amoeba Software has announced Slipstream (US$20,) a new application coming in early 2005 that allows any audio from any application to be heard through remote speakers. AirTunes isn’t just for iTunes anymore – now users longing to listen to audio from RealPlayer, Windows Media Player, and any other application over their remote speakers will be able to do so, with Slipstream.
This one has PowerPick written all over it.

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How-To: Firewire HDTV Recording and Playback on Mac OS X (updated)

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Date: Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 08:31
Category: Archive

Motorola DCT6400 Digital Cable BoxI’m just received the new Comcast HD cable box (a Motorola DCT6400 Series, the DCT6412 is the HD-DVR) and it has two Firewire ports on the backplane that piqued my interest.
A little searching and some helpful comments on JBLOG have come up with some freeware solutions that allow you to capture HDTV signals from a Firewire-equipped cable box directly to your Mac. Talk about cool.
iRecord is a FireWire PVR for Mac OS X. It is designed to allow timed recording from FireWire devices that output MPEG2 transport streams, such as cable set-top boxes and ATSC OTA tuners.
AV Science Forum has posted an excellent How-To: Guide to Mac OS X Firewire HDTV recording. An excerpt:

MacOS X is currently the only viable solution for recording HDTV via firewire using an emulated D-VHS deck. With a properly setup system you can record and playback cable and OTA HDTV with no loss in picture quality or sound. As for as alternatives, there is a beta product called Firebus for Win XP but it is extremely buggy and the development status is unclear. The beta is also incidentally closed if your interested. Some have also reported some success recording with Linux but it is far from plug and play. For the moment the Mac is the best choice for the task. Below you’ll find the requirements and and some instructions for getting started recording HDTV with a Mac.

MacOSXHints has posted another tutorial on how to Record and playback high definition TV signals on your Mac

This 21st Century Holy Grail comes in the form of a recent FCC regulation requiring all cable companies to provide a Firewire-enabled Cable box to any customer who asks. (Yes, some government agencies are still on our side after all!) This law went into effect April 1st, and by now most Cable companies have complied.
Unlike regular TV, you cannot record HD with an analog VCR — or even a standard issue Tivo. You must have a Firewire connection … the very same Firewire that ships on every modern Mac. (bet you see where this is headed). You have the Mac, now all you need is the cable box and a pair of free programs: VirtualDVHS for recording, and VLC for playback!

MacTeens has also posted a tutorial How To: Make your own Home Theatre Mac (HTMac).

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Emerging Technologies Update

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Date: Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 08:49
Category: Archive

Here’s how Bluetooth, power over Ethernet, PCI Express and 802.11g have fared since being introduced over the past two years.
Sidebar: Beyond G: 802.11n – Next-generation wireless devices could offer four times the speed of 802.11g, but industry-standard products are still two years away. (Courtesy of Computerworld)

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EFF Sponsors Anonymous Communication Software

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Date: Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 08:15
Category: Archive

Linux Electrons is reporting on an interesting communication technology called Tor that allows internet users to communicate anonymously.

General News Yesterday the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) announced that it is becoming a sponsor of Tor, a technology project that helps organizations and individuals engage in anonymous communication online. Tor is a network-within-a-network that protects communication from a form of surveillance known as “traffic analysis.” …
“The Tor project is a perfect fit for EFF, because one of our primary goals is to protect the privacy and anonymity of Internet users,” said EFF Technology Manager Chris Palmer. “Tor can help people exercise their First Amendment right to free, anonymous speech online. And unlike many other security systems, Tor recognizes that there is no security without user-friendliness — if the mechanism is not accessible, nobody will use it. Tor strikes a balance between performance, usability, and security.”
Using Tor can help people anonymize web browsing and publishing, instant messaging, Secure Shell (SSH) protocol, and more. Tor also provides a platform on which software developers can build new applications with built-in anonymity, safety, and privacy features.

The PowerPage believes in the Constitution of the United States and in protecting the First Amendment right to free speech. Protect yourself by using tools like Tor, PGP and anonymous remailers like Riot.

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EFF Sponsors Archive Communication Software

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Date: Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 08:15
Category: Archive

Linux Electrons is reporting on an interesting communication technology called Tor that allows internet users to communicate Archively.

General News Yesterday the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) announced that it is becoming a sponsor of Tor, a technology project that helps organizations and individuals engage in Archive communication online. Tor is a network-within-a-network that protects communication from a form of surveillance known as “traffic analysis.” …
“The Tor project is a perfect fit for EFF, because one of our primary goals is to protect the privacy and anonymity of Internet users,” said EFF Technology Manager Chris Palmer. “Tor can help people exercise their First Amendment right to free, Archive speech online. And unlike many other security systems, Tor recognizes that there is no security without user-friendliness — if the mechanism is not accessible, nobody will use it. Tor strikes a balance between performance, usability, and security.”
Using Tor can help people anonymize web browsing and publishing, instant messaging, Secure Shell (SSH) protocol, and more. Tor also provides a platform on which software developers can build new applications with built-in anonymity, safety, and privacy features.

The PowerPage believes in the Constitution of the United States and in protecting the First Amendment right to free speech. Protect yourself by using tools like Tor, PGP and Archive remailers like Riot.

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