Panic Unison Usenet Client (Updated)

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 11:46
Category: Software

Panic Unison Usenet ClientRemember the early days of Usenet? Using your ISP’s awful news server and crawling through mountains of alt.whatever? What a pain. Usenet has taken a new direction these days and most ISPs only offer a fraction of the newsgroups that are available and they store very little, making archives weak. Don’t even get me started on the censored newsgroups.
Anyway, if you want to return to the glory days of 1981 (!) you’ll need a decent Usenet client…

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FileSalvage to the Rescue

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 10:03
Category: Software

File Salvage 4.1 Drive Recovery SoftwareSubRosaSoft.com LLC has announced FileSalvage version 4.1. The latest generation of their data recovery software for Mac OS X software adds detailed logging and the ability to process disk images. Defense attorney’s, law enforcement and corporate agencies can now access EnCase, Unix DDM, CopyCatX, etc. image file systems without purchasing expensive computer forensics software…

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Sony VAIO Engineers Being Recruited for Intel PowerBook?

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 10:43
Category: Hardware

Apple PowerBook 100A story over at Engadget speculates that Apple may be recruiting a team of ex Sony VAIO notebook engineers to design the new Intel PowerBook:

A reliable source tells us that Apple has been ?having trouble playing catch up with the learning curve for designing using the Intel platform? and that in order to have an Intel-based PowerBook out by next year they?ve been scrambling to recruit an engineering team with some experience building light and thin Intel-based laptops. And how are they going to do that? By poaching from Sony apparently…

PowerBook cognoscenti will find this story highly plausible because it was Sony that either totally or partially developed (depending on who you ask) the original PowerBook 100 for Apple in 1991. The PowerBook 100, incidentally, was voted the Best Gadget of All Time, by Mobile PC 2005.

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CueType 1.0.3 Improves Typing Skills

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 10:52
Category: Software

A friend once told me that the single best way to learn how to type was to practice on Instant Messenger. I’ll be damned if my horrible “hunt and peck” style hasn’t turned into a respectable 25-30 words per minute because of my inline chatting. The problem is that my speed probably won’t get much higher than that without professional help. That’s when I cam across a Mac OS X application that bills itself as a “keyboarding driller featuring innovative typing cues.” Read More…

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Privacy Friday: Microsoft's Lockware Strategy

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 10:57
Category: Archive

Recent headlines blare that Microsoft has forged a new “alliance” with Hollywood, but what does that mean for people who use or create software and hardware that works with Microsoft products?
Seth Schoen, EFF’s staff technologist and resident expert on “trusted computing,” attended this year’s Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) to find out. In a four-part series of updates on Microsoft’s security and lockware strategy for Windows, Schoen explores the implications of the latest developments on your ability to control your own computer, create or use interoperable products, exercise your fair-use rights, protect your privacy, and maintain computer security. (Source: EFF)
Read More:
Part 1: “Microsoft Trusted Computing Updates
Part 2: “The Dangers of Device Authentication
Part 3: “Protected Media Path, Component Revocation, Windows Driver Lockdown
Part 4: “Microsoft Sells Out the Public on CGMS-A

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Privacy Friday: Is Your Printer Spying On You?

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 10:21
Category: Archive

Imagine that every time you printed a document, it automatically included a secret code that could be used to identify the printer – and potentially, the person who used it. Sounds like something from an episode of “Alias,” right?
Unfortunately, the scenario isn’t fictional. In an effort to identify counterfeiters, the US government has succeeded in persuading some color laser printer manufacturers to encode each page with identifying information. That means that without your knowledge or consent, an act you assume is private could become public. A communication tool you’re using in everyday life could become a tool for government surveillance. And what’s worse, there are no laws to prevent abuse. (EFF paper: “Investigating Machine Identification Code Technology in Color Laser Printers“)

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It's Been 15 Years: Time to Dump the Term "PowerBook"

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 06:42
Category: Opinion

The venerable PowerBook has been with us since 1991 when Apple released the PowerBook 100 (with the help of Sony) and Xerox PARC veteran and long-time Apple Fellow Alan Kay coined the term. Apple trademarked “PowerBook” shortly thereafter further solidifying the term in the modern technical vernacular. Apple launched their consumer notebook in 1999 and called it the “iBook” to differentiate it from its more expensive brother, the PowerBook.
As the iBook gained in “power” over the years Cupertino had a difficult time differentiating between their entry-level iBook and professional PowerBook offerings causing a lot of hand-wringing inside Apple’s marketing department. What exactly is the difference between an iBook and a PowerBook these days anyway? Monitor spanning? Puh-lease.
Click through for some of my suggestions…

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