Mossberg Thinks Apple Mouse not so "Mighty"

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Date: Saturday, August 6th, 2005, 05:59
Category: Accessory

In his column for the Wall Street Journal, Walt Mossberg picks the Microsoft Mouse over the Apple Mighty Mouse.

Microsoft’s new model is cordless, like most modern, premium mice. Apple’s Mighty Mouse is tethered to the computer with a cord, like most low-end models.
As with all of Apple’s mice in recent years, the Mighty Mouse has no visible buttons. The entire top surface of the shiny white mouse operates as a giant button. In single-button mice, this works fine and is kind of cool. But it makes it hard to do a right-click. So Apple built touch sensors into the Mighty Mouse that detect whether you are pressing its left or right side.
Macintosh fan sites on the Web are already hailing this as another of Apple’s brilliant design coups. It’s not. In my tests, I found that the design makes right-clicking slower and clumsier than on a typical Microsoft or Logitech mouse with real buttons. (These non-Apple mice work perfectly on Macs.)

Read his whole column at the Wall Street Journal.

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RadTech Optex Products Acquired by Kensington?

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Date: Friday, August 5th, 2005, 05:32
Category: Accessory

RadTech Podsleevz Purchased by Kensington?I thought I recognized something while reading Tom’s Top 5 in (the print edition of) Cargo magazine. In it Tom lists the familiar-looking 3-Pack Microfiber Sleeves for 20/30 GB iPod from Kensington which look surprisingly like the cool Optex iPod Sleevz from RadTech.us (which were awarded a PowerPick in 2004).
No one’s talking’ about whether or not Kensington bought the line from RadTech but on the back of the packages for the Kensington Screensavrz, Scratch Removal System and Micro-fiber iPod Sleeves is a small note that reads “Developed by RadTech www.radtech.us.”

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Mighty Mouse Squeaks Quietly

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Date: Friday, August 5th, 2005, 00:12
Category: Accessory

The Mighty Mouse is a really neat piece of technology with touch sensitive left/right buttons and the groovey scroll ball. Apple even put a speaker in it to give us feedback. The problem is that I must demand complete silence to hear the thing! Does anyone else feel the volume level of the Mighty Mouse makes the feedback useless? Who’s going to hack the driver to increase volume to a more desirable level?

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What's Hiding in the Barcode on Your Driver's License?

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Date: Thursday, August 4th, 2005, 00:47
Category: Hack

Decode Your BarcodeThe SWIPE Toolkit is a collection of web-based tools that sheds light on personal data collection and usage practices in the United States. The tools demonstrate the value of personal information on the open market and enable people to access information encoded on a driver’s license or stored in some of the many commercial data warehouses.
Decode Your Barcode unveils the mystery of the 2D barcode. Currently 39 states use 2D barcodes to digitally store personal information on the backside of drivers’ licenses. What information is encoded on your license that machines can read and you cannot?

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Where did Apple go Wrong?

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Date: Thursday, August 4th, 2005, 00:38
Category: Opinion

With the success of the iPod and iTunes, and the growing support for Mac OS X in the software industry – one still has the proverbial question. Where did Apple go wrong?

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PowerPage Podcast Episode 2

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Date: Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 11:39
Category: Podcast

PowerPage Podcast 2On Episode 2 of the PowerPage Podcast I discuss my PowerPage story about dumping the name “PowerBook,” Trusted Computing DRM found in the OS X for Intel developer DVD, Apple’s video iPod patent, and a Bluetooth car attack. My guest in the studio is Bart Hirst of BartSource.com.
You can subscribe to the PowerPage Podcast via iTunes.

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PB FixIt Announces iBook G4 Part Line

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Date: Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 03:35
Category: Hardware

PB FixIt today announced a complete line of over 80 parts and accessories for Apple’s iBook G4 series. Read more…

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Melting iMac Mod

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Date: Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005, 22:28
Category: Mod

Is your G5 iMac too hot to handle? One user was overheating after 40 minutes with CPU temps exceeding 76C / 170F. His solution ain’t pretty, but worked like a charm. Read on…

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Mobile Google Maps on the Treo 650

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Date: Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005, 10:59
Category: Mobile Phone

Google Maps on the Treo 650 with KMaps“Since I use Google Maps often and I use my Treo 650 all the time, I thought it would be nice to have some of Google Maps on my Treo. Google Maps implementation is heavy on AJAX and no Treo 650 web browser to my current knowledge is able to handle Google Maps the way they are handled in PC browsers (at least my Xiino and Blazer aren’t able to handle them). So, I decided to add some of Google Maps’ functionality on Treo 650.” (KMaps Courtesy of TreoNauts)

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Think DRM: Apple Adding Trusted Computing to OS X

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Date: Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005, 08:33
Category: Hardware

A post on boingboing has some people ready to defect from the Macintosh platform. Ok, step off the ledge, it’s only a Slashdot report that “the new Intel kernel Apple has included with the Developer Kit DVD uses TCPA/TPM DRM. More specifically, it includes “a TCPA/Palladium implementation that uses a Infineon 1.1 chip which will prevent certain parts of the OS from working unless authorized.” (click through and read the comments).

This means that “open formats” are no longer meaningful. It means that the price of being a Mac user will be eternal vigilance. If this “feature” appears in a commercial, shipping version of Apple’s OS, they’ll lose me as a customer — I’ve used Apple computers since 1979 and have a Mac tattooed on my right bicep, but this is a deal-breaker.

The Trusted Computing Group would have you believe that it’s all good but an article by the EFF has quite a different take on the situation:

There is a widespread perception that personal computer security is in an unfortunate state and that something must be done to fix it. There are many promising approaches to improving security — redesigning operating systems, changing programming methodologies, or altering the PC’s hardware itself. It is well known that a comprehensive defense against the security threats faced by PC users will involve several approaches, not just one. An insecure system can’t magically become “secure” with the addition of a single piece of technology.

Would you buy a Mac with Trusted Computing inside?

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