Apple's Double Standard on Benchmarking

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Date: Wednesday, January 11th, 2006, 22:57
Category: Intel

When Apple tried to prove that G5 was better than Intel, they used a generic non-optimised GCC compiler for the Intel machine. This time, they used an optimised Intel compiler to prove that Intel is better than the G5. How quickly we forget!
Read the full article at ExtremeTech.com. (Thanks Digg).

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MacBook Pro: A Developer's Rant

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Date: Wednesday, January 11th, 2006, 22:00
Category: MacBook Pro

Unsanity, who brings us such OS X greats as WindowShade, FruitMenu and ShapeShifter has a blog entry about the new MacBook Pro (Lost in Transition: Overcane of Antflower Milk) . Rosyna takes Apple to task over some of the glaring omissions in the PowerBook successor that seem to have been glossed over in the halo-effect of Macworld. Even though I lobbied for a PowerBook name change a while ago, one of my favorite parts of the article is its criticism of the name “MacBook.”

Another change is, of course, the name. Which is horrible. It doesn’t roll off the tongue at all and is just too confusing. It actually sounds like some child created it. Well, some PC using child. It’s uninspired… The new name really sounds like a good name for Accounting software, not a machine.

Click through, this one is a great read…
Also worth a read is TUAW’s analysis of Unsanity’s analysis of the MBP.

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How Does MacBook Pro Stack up?

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Date: Wednesday, January 11th, 2006, 21:57
Category: MacBook Pro

Tristan has created a chart comparing the new MacBook Pros to the PowerBook G4s they replace. Tristan also compares the MacBook Pro to the Acer Travelmate 8200, another Intel Core Duo-powered notebook computer. (Thanks TUAW).

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iTunes 6.02 not Spyware

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Date: Wednesday, January 11th, 2006, 21:23
Category: iTunes

It appears that the 6.0.2 update to iTunes sends information to the Apple Music store about what’s currently playing, and will make recommendations. BoingBoing has the story, and some analysis about what’s happening at the bottom of the page.
In case you’re wondering the Apple recommend-ware is disguised as a “mini store” that appears in small window under your playlist. Long story short: you can hide it by clicking on the little up-arrow button in the lower right corner of the iTunes window (to the left of the EQ button) or by selecting Edit -> Hide MiniStore.
According to the updates at the bottom of the BoingBoing article hiding the MiniStore will disable the spyware behaviour.
Is it just me or is anyone else concerned about the direction Apple is taking here?

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The Apple Core: MacBook Pro, What's in a name?

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Date: Wednesday, January 11th, 2006, 09:00
Category: The Apple Core

Back in July 2005 I suggested that it was time for Apple to retire the name PowerBook in favor something that would depart from its “Power”PC heritage (even though the original PowerBook predates the PowerPC) and move into the 21st century and reflect Apple’s commitment to use silicon from Intel.
Yesterday’s announcement of the MacBook Pro notebook was a surprise to most and it’s interesting to see that Apple finally dropped the name PowerBook from the product line.
Read the rest of the story on my ZDNet Blog: The Apple Core.

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Mac OS 10.4.4 Released

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Date: Wednesday, January 11th, 2006, 09:21
Category: Software

Mac-OS-10.4.4-Released.jpgApple released Mac OS 10.4.4 via software update (27.6MB) also available are iTunes 6.0.2 (18.9MB) and iPod Updater 2006-01-10 (27.6MB). I’d recommend waiting at least 72 hours before installing any software update.

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Google Earth for Mac Released

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Date: Wednesday, January 11th, 2006, 09:35
Category: Software

The announcement of Google Earth for Mac OS X got lost in the excitement of yesterday’s Macworld Expo keynote. If you’re interested, you can read about it on the official Google Blog and download it here.

Happy Travels
After you have installed Google Earth, you may want to explore some of the interesting data layers being published by other folks on the web. Anyone can publish content for Google Earth using our geographic markup language (KML). To view these, simply click the links below. They will appear in your “Places” list. To save them for future use, right-click on the feed you wish to save and select “Save to My Places.”

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