Drive Genius 2.1.1 Released

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, April 16th, 2009, 13:35
Category: Software

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Prosoft Engineering has released Drive Genius 2.1.1, an updated version of its drive repair and recovery program for Mac OS X.
The new version, a 23.3 megabyte download, offers the following fixes and features:

  • Enhanced Duplicate tool has an option to verify the destination of whole-drive copies. In addition, source bad blocks can be skipped if found during a whole-drive copy.
  • Increased performance and reliability of Defrag.
  • Bug Fix: spurious “test aborted by disk” S.M.A.R.T. warnings in 10.5.x
  • Bug Fix: after shredding a volume, a new volume would always be created as “Untitled” instead of using the previous volume name.
  • Bug Fix: the tooltip displayed for duplicate files in DriveSlim contained an invalid path to the original file when displaying results from the boot volume.
  • Bug Fix: crash during launch if information about installed languages could not be obtained (10.4.x/PPC only).
  • Bug Fix: Adobe and Microsoft application updates would fail if language bundles were removed or their binaries trimmed; these are now excluded from the DriveSlimsearch results.
  • Other bug fixes.
  • Drive Genius retails for US$99 and requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later installed to work. The application is a Universal Binary and functions natively under both PowerPC and Intel-based hardware.

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    Man Traded Kidney for PowerBook in 2000

    Posted by:
    Date: Thursday, April 16th, 2009, 08:56
    Category: Fun, PowerBook

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    During Apple’s higher-end product releases, we look at the cool new items for sale and wonder what we’d sacrifice for the new Mac Pro or a 17″ MacBook Pro notebook.
    According to PC World, one person went a step further and, back in 2000, apparently indirectly traded his kidney for a then-brand-new PowerBook G3.
    Back then, Washington, D.C.-area consultant Phil Shapir was advising an elderly couple, who brought up the question as to why Apple didn’t use senior citizens in its advertising. At a certain point, the wife asked her husband, “Why don’t we show him the kidney Powerbook? Maybe he can answer some questions about that computer.”
    When Shapiro asked why they call it the “kidney PowerBook,” she said, “My husband donated one of his kidneys to his sister. She asked him what he’d like in return. Without hesitation, he said, ‘I’d love a PowerBook.'”
    And he got it.

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    Apple Files Patent for Motion-Adaptive iPhone Software

    Posted by:
    Date: Thursday, April 16th, 2009, 08:56
    Category: iPhone, Patents, Software

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    Apple may be looking into creating a version of its iPhone with a front-facing camera as well as a software interface capable of adjusting itself for more precise interaction when the user carrying the phone is in motion.
    While the front-facing camera idea hints towards the inevitable adoption of video conference capabilities by the iPhone in the coming years, the adaptive software interface concept could become a reality that much sooner, improving a user’s accuracy in making touch selections by increasing the size of user interface elements on the touch-screen when its determined that the user is operating the device while jogging or participation in some other kind of motion-based activity.
    According to AppleInsider, Apple has filed a patent that proposes an updated version of its iPhone OS software that can detect when the device is in motion and then compare the detected degree of motion to one or more predetermined “signatures of motion.” The iPhone software could then adjust itself by enlarging selection areas on the screen to a degree suitable for the current motion of the device and user.
    “For example, if the user wishes to view the contact information for ‘John Adams,’ the user touches the display over the area of the row for the contact ‘John Adams,” Apple says. “While the device is moving, the motion of the device can be detected. The device can change the size of the rows of the contacts in the contact list application to give the user a larger target area for each contact. For example, the height of a row can be increased. This gives the user a larger touch area with which to select a contact. In some implementations, the height of the toolbar can be increased as well.”
    The 16-page patent filing made back in November of 2007 also suggests that interface elements, such as an array of home screen icons, could shift their position on the screen based on predictions of where the user may touch the screen. Oddly enough, the need for such adjustments isn’t entirely clear from Apple’s description.
    “The shift moves the target touch areas of the display objects to a different position. In some implementations, the new position is a predetermined distance from the original position,” the company says. “In some other implementations, the new position is determined by the device based on a prediction of where the user will touch the touch-sensitive display if the user wanted to select the user interface element while the device is in motion.”
    The filing is credited to Apple employee John Louch.