Apple Takes Control of “TabletMac” Trademark

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Date: Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009, 06:56
Category: News

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A few years ago, Axiotron began to offer an aftermarket modification for the MacBook notebook that converted it into a tablet. The modification remains for sale at US$699 and takes a stock MacBook, removes the keyboard and screen, and adds a Wacom pen-based screen to give the device a tablet form factor.

During this process, Axiotron originally began marketing the devices as a “TabletMac” as referenced in this 2007 press release and filed a trademark for the term. Sometime in the past year, however, the trademark was transferred from Axiotron to Apple, and Apple is now listed as the owner of the trademark.

Per MacRumors, the transfer of ownership may not mean Apple has plans on using the term for their own long-anticipated tablet device. Apple may have simply contested the trademark due to the potential for confusion between “TabletMac” and their own trademarks.

Even so, the trademark has now been snagged and Apple may be drawing some lines in the sand as to product identification in the upcoming consumer market.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and let us know what you think!

Google Chrome Beta Nearing, Some Features on Hold

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Date: Tuesday, December 1st, 2009, 08:04
Category: News, Software

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If you’re waiting for Google’s Chrome browser for the Mac, a stable beta may not be that far away.

Yesterday, TechCrunch pointed to to a Twitter posting from Mike Pinkerton of the Chrome for Mac team noting that there were only eight bugs remaining to be addressed before the Mac beta of Chrome is ready for its launch expected for some time in the next month.

“8 remaining M4 Mac beta blockers! Go team! #chrome”

This means that there are only 8 things standing in the way of Chrome for Mac going beta. “M4″ stands for “milestone 4,” which is how they phrase “version 4,” which the Mac beta build of Chrome will be (the current dev channel version is 4.0.249.12, for example).

So far, the following features have been pushed out to the next beta version in order to allow Google to meet its goal of releasing the initial beta before the end of the year:

- Bookmark Manager

- App Mode (allows Chrome to run Web apps in their own simplified windows)

- Task Manager

- Gears (offline support for Web apps; apparently being scrapped entirely in favor of HTML5)

- Bookmark syncing

- Multi-touch gestures

- 64-bit support

- Full support for extensions

- Full screen mode (possibly)

Developer builds of Chrome for Mac have been available for several months, but the move to a beta version suggests that users can expect to see a fairly stable browser with a number of significant features included. Work will continue on Chrome with additional Developer Preview releases occurring on a regular basis. Refined versions will then periodically be released as new additions to Chrome’s Beta channel. Releases will eventually make their way to Chrome’s “Stable” channel, which will offer “rock solid” performance without the inclusion of features still under development and testing.

BBC Quashes iPlayer App Rumor

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Date: Tuesday, December 1st, 2009, 08:50
Category: iPhone, News

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The BBC network has moved to quash reports that a native iPhone BBC iPlayer application is in the works. Per Macworld UK, weekend reports suggested the BBC’s popular iPlayer might be coming to the iPhone after a mock-up was used on a BBC iPlayer Data Pack report, showcasing October’s facts and figures for the catch-up TV service.

However, BBC blogger Nick Reynolds in response to questions about the iPhone images used in the report wrote: “Antshez and AllAboutiPhone – the images are old images and should not be taken to mean that anything is likely to happen soon. Since the images seem to have provoked unnecessary speculation we’ll probably update the pack later today and remove them.”

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple Posts Tips for Sudden Motion Sensor, Trackpad Use on Recent MacBooks

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Date: Tuesday, December 1st, 2009, 05:04
Category: MacBook

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Apple has recently updated a couple of its knowledge base articles which may prove useful for MacBook notebook owners. Per CNET, the articles cover how to enable and disable the built-in sudden motion sensor in MacBook and PowerBook computers, and also how to use the glass multi-touch track pad.

Advanced tips for Sudden Motion Sensor:
Apple included sudden motion sensor technology in PowerBook and MacBook computers to protect components such as hard drives when the computer is moved. Additionally, there are some third-party security programs that interface with the sensors, which will alarm when enabled if the computer is moved. Despite the conveniences, there are situations where the sensor may be inadvertently activated, causing the hard drive to repeatedly pause while it parks the drive heads. This KB article covers how to disable it in various MacBook and PowerBook models in various versions of OS X.

Using the Multi-Touch trackpad (Video).

Tips for using the Multi-Touch trackpad:
The multi-touch trackpads in Apple’s MacBooks are built to be intuitive; however, some new users inconvenience themselves by not using the trackpads properly by clicking with all fingers, or developing awkward two-hand methods for doing routine tasks. These articles cover the details on the trackpads, and how to best position your fingers when using them.

It’s nothing groundbreaking, but it should be useful and if you or if a friend or family member snags a new MacBook this holiday season, give the links a gander.