Source comments on WebKit 2 framework for upcoming browsers

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Date: Friday, April 9th, 2010, 04:20
Category: News, Software

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Apple’s been able to pull off a number of cool tricks with its WebKit framework. Per AppleInsider, anew framework for the WebKit open source Web browser layout engine was revealed Thursday, bringing with it a built-in “split process model” that will keep Web content such as JavaScript, HTML and layout in a separate process in browsers such as Apple’s Safari and Mobile Safari.

Patches that comprise the new framework, dubbed “WebKit2,” are due to be released shortly, according to Anders Carlsson, who works on Apple’s Safari browser as well as the open source WebKit engine. In addition to Safari, WebKit also powers the Google Chrome browser, the Android Web browser, and Palm’s WebOS.

“WebKit2 is designed from the ground up to support a split process model, where the web content (JavaScript, HTML, layout, etc) lives in a separate process,” wrote Carlsson. “This model is similar to what Google Chrome offers, with the major difference being that we have built the process split model directly into the framework, allowing other clients to use it.”

In this method, each tab within a browser is “sandboxed,” or existing in its own space. In essence, this means each tab is like its own separate browser. While Chrome currently does this in its own proprietary way in its WebKit-based browser, building the capability into the framework of WebKit2 would allow other WebKit-based browsers such as Safari to employ this same technique.

Documentation accompanying the WebKit2 release noted that one goal for the new framework is to create a stable, non-blocking application programming interface. That would allow an unlimited number of threads to call an API at once, making the browser more flexible. This would be achieved, the documentation said, through a number of techniques listed below:

– Notification style client callbacks (e.g. didFinishLoadForFrame): These inform the embedder that something has happened, but do not give them the chance to do anything about it.
Policy style clients callbacks (e.g. decidePolicyForNavigationAction) These allow the embedder to decide on an action at their leisure, notifying the page through a listener object.

– Policy settings (e.g. WKContextSetCacheModel, WKContextSetPopupPolicy): These allow the embedder to opt into a predefined policy without any callbacks into the UIProcess. These can either be an enumerated set of specific policies, or something more fine-grained, such as a list of strings with wildcards.

– Injected code (e.g. WebBundle): Code can be loaded into the WebProcess for cases where all the other options fail. This can useful when access to the DOM is required. [Planned, but not currently implemented]

Rumor: Updated MacBook Pro could surface as early as April 13th

Posted by:
Date: Friday, April 9th, 2010, 03:22
Category: MacBook Pro, Rumor

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Following the iPad coverage and hype, you’re still hankering for updated MacBook Pro news. Per Australian Macworld, a source has stated that updated MacBook Pro units featuring Intel’s new Core i5 and i7 processors could be seen as early as Tuesday, April 13th.

There’s no word as to exact specifics but the Best Buy web site seems to be adding some fuel to the fire, first by showing a proverbial mark of death in its database last month, and now by making the 15-inch model unavailable on BestBuy.com.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’ve heard anything on your end, please let us know.