Apple offers replacement program for faulty Time Capsule units sold in 2008

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Date: Monday, July 12th, 2010, 07:30
Category: News, Time Capsule

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You either love or hate the Time Capsule, but when the unit shuts down unexpectedly or doesn’t power on at all, you tend to land on the side of hating it a bit more.

Per Macworld and a recent Knowledge Base article, Apple is offering a replacement program on Time Capsule models sold between Feburary and June 2008. The company says affected models of its backup device may shut down unexpectedly or may no longer power on.

Apple’ss advisory is not an official recall, per se, the company is only asking for those with affected units, rather than every device within the time frame. The Knowledge Base article covers Time Capsules with serial numbers XX807XXXXXX – XX814XXXXXX.

According to the company, devices that fall into the serial number range and time frame can be brought into an Apple Store or other Authorized Retailer, where, if the problem is confirmed by the staff, Apple will repair or replace it free of charge. If you want to keep the data from the hard drive, Apple’s official word on the matter is that it will provide “options depending on where you live.” Users in the U.S. and Japan are advised to mail the device to Apple and turnaround time is estimated at “3 to 5 days”, whereas all other countries can have data transferred from the old Time Capsule to the replacement in-store. Of course, if you have the ability to transfer the data to another hard drive yourself, it might be the better option.

If you had this issue earlier, and paid for a repair or replacement Time Capsule, Apple advises you to call the company to discuss a possible refund.

Now, if your Time Capsule falls within the range of dates and serial numbers, but isn’t exhibiting any symptoms, there’s no need to rush to a Genius Bar just yet. This replacement program covers affected models three years from the original date of purchase, so if the Time Capsule you bought in February 2008 starts having power issues in a few months, you’ll have until 2011 to bring it in. And if your device falls outside the range but is exhibiting similar issues, it can’t hurt to get it checked out: Apple says it will “evaluate the service data and will provide further updates to the program if needed.”

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple move closer to obtaining Wi-Fi license for Chinese market iPhones

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Date: Monday, July 12th, 2010, 07:51
Category: iPhone, News

Since its inception into the Chinese marketplace, Apple’s iPhone has been restricted from incorporating a Wi-Fi capability.

That may be about to change as this week, Chinese regulators issued a network access license for an Apple iPhone that is equipped to use the China-developed wireless LAN security protocol, WAPI (WLAN Authentication and Privacy Infrastructure). China’s Telecommunications Equipment and Certification Center (TENAA) published photos of the phone, which appears to be an iPhone 3G, on its Website.

Per Macworld, representatives from Apple and China Telecom, the local carrier that Apple has selected as its partner, would not comment on the device’s capabilities, nor when it would go on sale.

When iPhones began officially entering the Chinese market in 2009, Apple was forced to disable their Wi-Fi capabilities to comply with Chinese laws. At the time, Chinese regulators would only allow mobile phones using the Chinese WAPI protocol for secure wireless access.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

We Have a Winner: Outlet Charging Proves Faster for iPhone 4

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Date: Monday, July 12th, 2010, 04:02
Category: iPhone, iPod, News

Among the great debates of computer technology (along with whether or not to shut your computer down for the night or put it to sleep and how this affects the hardware) is the question as to whether or not to charge an iPhone or similar device via an outlet or USB port. Even in the case of charging an iPad, where the user receives a “not charging” message near the battery indicator, the device is charging, but slowly.

The guys over at When Will Apple? took the time to do a pretty decent job of comparing charging times on the iPhone 4, comparing USB to AC outlet. The conclusion: USB charging takes 23% longer to charge an iPhone 4 than charging via an AC outlet. If you’re in a rush to charge your phone, that’s a pretty significant difference.

The little flaw in this test is not knowing the amount of charge coming from the USB port used, as not all USB ports are created equal.

If you’ve found a different result on your end, please let us know.