Square Trade study finds iPhone 4 glass 82% more susceptible to breaking that iPhone 3GS glass

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, 05:26
Category: iPhone, News

You love your iPhone 4 like an additional child or pet.

So be sure to take care of it.

Per 9to5Mac, a Square Trade study has determined that the iPhone 4′s glass casing has been show to break 82% more than an iPhone 3GS’ casing.

While the iPhone 4 has two sides of glass instead of one, thus potentially doubling the incidents versus previous iPhone generations that maintained plastic backs, it was also determined that the plastic around the sides of the iPhone 3GS is able to cushion potential impact much better than the iPhone 4′s metal antenna-frame.

Other findings include the following:
-iPhone 4 owners reported 82% more damaged screens in the first four months compared to iPhone 3GS owners.

-More than 25% of damage reported was to the glass on the back of the unit.

-The reported accident rate for the iPhone 4 was 68% higher than for the iPhone 3GS.

-An estimated 15.5% of iPhone 4 owners will have an accident within a year of buying their phone.

-iPhone 4 screen damage is responsible for more than four-fifths of reported accidents during the last four months, slightly higher than the iPhone 3GS during the same time period.

Square Trade currently functions as the largest independent warranty provider in the world and has analyzed iPhone accidents for well over 20,000 iPhone 4 units.

If you’ve had an iPhone 4 glass incident on your end or want to hurl in your two cents, let us know what’s on your mind.

Apple releases third iOS 4.2 beta, adds SMS ringtones, changes AirPlay functionality

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, 04:47
Category: iPhone, News, Software

Late Tuesday Apple released the third beta of iOS 4.2 to developers alongside the second beta of iTunes 10.1, making subtle changes to the distributions of the former for both the iPhone and the iPad.

Per fscklog, the iOS 4.2 build releases seem to be following a two week cycle, as the first iOS 4.2 beta was released four weeks ago, with the second beta arriving two weeks after.

People familiar with the latest iOS beta said it is known as build 8C5115c.

The beta contains several significant changes, including an updated version of the modem firmware. Noticeably missing from the beta were AirPlay features from previous builds. The AirPlay button has disappeared from the Photos, Videos, and YouTube apps on the distribution for the iPad.

Developers have noticed a bug with the AirPrint functionality. When printing from an iPhone, the image sometimes prints as just the size of the iPhone’s screen, not the original image size.

The beta also packs a number of smaller additions. According to fscklog, the new beta adds “a larger number” of tones for receiving text messages on the iPhone 4. The 17 new SMS ringtones include tones such as “Calypso,” “Choo Choo,” “Sherwood Forest,” and “Tiptoes.”

In a minor change to the iPad, the Connect to iTunes recovery screen now uses the controversial new iTunes 10 icon.

The iTunes 10.1 beta released alongside the iOS 4.2 beta continues to support printing.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’ve gotten your mitts on the new beta, please let us know what you make of it.

Microsoft releases Office 2004 11.6.1, Office 2008 12.2.7, Open XML Converter 1.1.7 updates

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, 04:20
Category: News, Software

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Late Tuesday, Microsoft released version 11.6.1 of its Microsoft Office 2004 suite, version 12.2.7 of its Microsoft Office 2008 suite and version 1.1.7 of its Open XML Converter Utility. The Office updates, which weigh in at 16.4 and 333 megabytes, respectively, focus on improving security for both suites, fixing vulnerabilities that could allow malicious code to overwrite portions of your Mac’s memory and run arbitrary commands.

Open XML File Format Converter for Mac 1.1.7 is a 45MB update and repairs similar bugs.

The updates are free and available through the Microsoft AutoUpdate programs and require Mac OS X 10.2 or later to run Office 2004 and Mac OS X 10.4 or later to run Office 2008.

If you’ve installed the updates and have any feedback to offer, let us know.

iPad to hit Walmart shelves Friday, October 15th

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, October 12th, 2010, 04:00
Category: iPad, News, retail

Retail giant Walmart has announced that hundreds of its stores will begin selling the iPad on Friday, October 15th. This number will eventually expand to 2,300 stores throughout November.

Per Electronista, Walmart revealed the news Monday evening, confirming last week’s rumor that the Bentonville, Arkansas mega-retailer would start carrying Apple’s iPad this week. The chain’s stores will offer all six models of the tablet device.

The iPad can be ordered online from the Walmart web site but must be picked up in store. Retail stores will feature the device as part of a “separate showcase of Apple hardware,” the report noted.

According to sources, some Walmart stores have already placed the iPad on the shelves alongside Apple’s iPods in advance of Friday’s official launch.

If you’ve seen the iPad at your local Walmart prior to the Friday launch, let us know.

Rumor: Fifth-gen iPhone to support GSM, CDMA, will forego 4G for the time being

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, October 12th, 2010, 04:44
Category: iPhone, Rumor

There’s some nifty stuff en route for the fifth generation iPhone, even if it doesn’t encapsulate everything at once.

Per TechCrunch. the upcoming iPhone will be capable of running on networks based on both of the world’s most popular 3G wireless standards but will forgo support for the faster 4G networks that are just now coming online.

Following rumors up to 11 months old, the article claims that Apple’s next major iPhone revision will run on both GSM and CDMA networks (presumably via a dual-mode Qualcomm baseband chip) but won’t support the next-generation of faster, Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks, more communally referred to as 4G networks.

The handset will reportedly take a less aggressive approach that will see it delay the iPhone’s support of 4G networks until some time in 2012, allowing it to bypass the first generation of power-hungry and potentially problematic LTE baseband controllers in favor of boosting its efforts around proprietary technologies like FaceTime.

Such an approach would be in the vein of more traditional efforts such as the launch of the original iPhone, which only supported AT&T’s robust 2.5G EDGE network despite broad availability of the faster 3G technology around the same time.

“Apple simply doesn’t want to be the guinea pig on new LTE networks that aren’t ready for primetime, and Steve Jobs knows not to trust the hype that’s spewed by the carriers on 4G,” the report says. “The truth is that 3G networks have many more years of life, and the transition to LTE will be much slower than the carriers want you to believe (LTE doesn’t even have its voice standard fleshed out yet).”

It’s for these reasons, the report adds, that AT&T has been upgrading its network for broader support of the faster HSPA+ (or the so-called 3.5G) standard while Verizon has been working to implement an enhancement to the CDMA standard that will let future devices transmit both data and voice communications simultaneously.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Happy Columbus Day from the PowerPage!!!

Posted by:
Date: Monday, October 11th, 2010, 11:45
Category: Announcement

It’s Columbus Day, a relatively nifty holiday once you put the politics aside and with that in mind, the staff of O’Grady’s PowerPage will be taking the day off to get some decent food, grab a nap and dream of nifty iOS-based devices on the horizon.

We encourage you to do the same.



Have a safe and happy Columbus Day and we’ll be back tomorrow with the mobile Apple technology news you’re hankering for.

Review: 120GB Mercury Extreme Pro 2.5″ Notebook Drive

Posted by:
Date: Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 12:35
Category: hard drive, Hardware, Review

Maybe it’s part of getting older.

When the idea of solid state hard drives first emerged a few years ago, there was some hesitancy on my part.

Not quite the smashing of all available nearby looms, but some hesitancy.

This was a new thing, a hard drive made entirely of flash memory with no moving parts whatsoever and thus mysterious. And after years of fighting with both ATA-IDE drives (including occasionally realigning the pins with a pen when they bent) and SATA-based hard drives, you become hesitant to change.

Beyond my own hesitancy came the idea of sheer capacity. Yes, various hard drive companies had been offering solid state options for a while, but when they first hit, their capacities were a fraction of what you’d find on a conventional hard drive with moving parts. Yes, a MacBook Air with a quiet solid state hard drive seemed cool when it first came out, but when your capacity topped out at 40 to 80 gigabytes, this put pause on being an early adopter.

Still, 120 gigabytes didn’t seem like something to sneeze at and with my 2008 white plastic MacBook’s conventional SATA hard drive slowing down during iMovie work, there seemed to be no time like the present to try an alternative.

The result: I’m going to be reluctant to have to ship Other World Computing’s 120GB Extreme Mercury Pro SSD drive back in a couple of days.

Having done the classic hard-drive-swaperoo of taking the new drive, putting it in an external carrier, cloning the old hard drive’s data to the new drive and then swapping the new drive in, the drive booted cleanly and without issue. In the following months, the drive has run a bit quieter than its conventional SATA alternative and felt just as brisk as a conventional notebook hard drive.

Even if the drive itself doesn’t blaze along at a professional grade speeds (there’s always been something cool about a high end 10,000 RPM desktop hard drive tearing through Photoshop and Final Cut processes without slowing down in the least), the Mercury felt like something you could install and forget about. Yes, this was a new thing, my very first flash hard drive. Still, once installed, it fell into the background, ran completely reliably no matter what was thrown at it and never seemed to slow.

Granted, this isn’t the most exciting news in the world, but it does offer a promise for the encompassing technology itself. Even if conventional SATA notebook drives still offer a larger capacity and these are the early years of flash-based notebook hard drives, there’s something reliable here. As strange as the idea of a hard drive without moving parts may be (upon removal from the box, the drive itself weighed next to nothing, almost if if you’d received a fake cardboard hard drive in the mail), the end product works reliably enough to install into grandma’s Apple notebook if need be (provided it supports SATA hard drives), makes sure all her old files have been cloned over for her to use and you’re off to the races.

No, this isn’t groundbreaking, but it is cool, fun to install and reliable in the end. The drive installs, it works briskly and you can put it in the back of your mind and get on with the rest of your day, remembering to feed your pets instead of wondering why your hard drive appears to be groaning loudly or, worse, scraping one of its data platters during day to day operation.

And at the end of the day, none of these are terrible things.

Give it a gander.

The 120GB Mercury Extreme Pro retails from US$289.99 and is available now.

Rumor: Apple investigating potential iPhone 4 scratching issue

Posted by:
Date: Friday, October 8th, 2010, 04:37
Category: iPhone, News, Rumor

Apple is reportedly in “something of a panic” concerning an issue with the state of the glass on its best-selling iPhone 4 handset. Per MacNN, sources internal and external to the company have commented that engineers have discovered an issue related to the rear glass. If dirt or debris gets trapped in a slide-on case covering the phone’s back, this may potentially scratch the device. Whereas it would only ruin the look of an older iPhone, on the iPhone 4, the damage is thought to carry the risk of eventually cracking or outright fracturing the glass.

As a response, the company is said to have blocked sales of most iPhone 4 cases from Apple Stores. Only the online storefront is believed to have reversed the policy, and then just this week. The iPhone team is currently said to be running a lab with a large, dedicated test program, although there is no indication of a solution on the horizon.

The issue may be even more critical for case makers than it is for Apple. While the latter has the reputation of the iPhone at stake, as well as income reaped from accessory licensing, case manufacturers are significantly smaller and can generate much of their revenue from the high foot traffic at Apple outlets. These companies may have have been relegated to selling at third-party stores or from their own websites.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’ve seen this issue on your end, please let us know.

Rumor: Second-gen iPad could feature 128GB of memory, Retina Display, USB port

Posted by:
Date: Friday, October 8th, 2010, 04:40
Category: iPad, News

Coming this holiday season, round two of the iPad.

Per AppleInsider, Taiwanese component suppliers have indicated that Apple’s next-generation iPad will sport a 7-inch high-resolution Retina Display, a camera, and 128GB of capacity as well as the guesstimate that it could sell 45 million in 2011.

Brian White of Ticonderoga Securities said this week that suppliers contacted during a trip to Taipei indicated that Apple plans to launch a new iPad in the first quarter of the 2011 calendar year. In addition to having a smaller 7″ size, he also said the device will have a “micro or mini USB” port.

The information is similar to what Goldman Sachs said in late September, including the addition of a USB port. If true, the addition of a new port could be a result of the European Union making MicroUSB the default charging method for mobile devices.

White said the next-generation iPad will replace the first-generation iPad when it is released next year. He made no mention of Apple maintaining its 9.7″ model, though Goldman Sachs said the new 7″ variety would be in addition to the current screen size.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases MacBook SMC Firmware Updater 1.4 for older MacBook, MacBook Pro notebooks

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Date: Friday, October 8th, 2010, 03:04
Category: MacBook, MacBook Pro, News, Software

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Late Thursday, Apple released its MacBook SMC Firmware Updater 1.4 for older MacBook and MacBook Pro models solves a charging issue that takes place when using the latest MagSafe power adapters.

The update, an 880 kilobyte download, requires Mac OS X 10.5.8 or 10.6.4 to install and run.

If you’ve tried the update and noticed any changes at all, please let us know in the comments.