Apple looking for possible Verizon iPad engineer in recent job post

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Date: Tuesday, December 14th, 2010, 06:40
Category: iPad, News

verizonlogo.jpg

While a Verizon iPhone is still up in the air, a new job posting on Apple’s web site shows that the company may be looking to put the iPad on the Verizon network according to Engadget.

While Verizon began selling the iPad back in November, the company uses a Mi-Fi style device to provide the wireless data connection as opposed to a direct, contracted connection.

According to the job description on Apple’s site, “The iPad System Engineer will work with the carrier business teams, business customers, and Apple sales resources to drive the adoption of iPad in enterprise accounts. Partnered with the iPad Sales team, the SE will be responsible for developing carrier relationships within the carrier technical teams and must have exceptional technical, project management, presentation and communication skills. He/She must also possess the ability to work without direct supervision or detailed direction. The successful candidate will have enterprise sales experience and must have an existing knowledge of the mobile market and the technologies that support it. Individual must have strong IT knowledge in the areas of enterprise messaging and collaboration, VPN, WiFi and enterprise security technologies. Hands-on experience with Microsoft Exchange Active Sync and Exchange Server is a plus. Must have the ability to effectively work with all levels in an organization including corporate CIOs and IT departments. Ability to work across a matrixed team is required.”

So, if you’re hankering for an iOS device on Verizon’s network, you may be one step closer to seeing this become a realization.

Seagate announces one terabyte 2.5″ notebook hard drive

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Date: Tuesday, December 14th, 2010, 06:15
Category: Hardware, News

Hard drive manufacturer Seagate on Monday announced the industry’s first 2.5″ enterprise-class drive with one terabyte of capacity, or about 60% more could be stored previously.

Per Macworld, the next generation Constellation hard drive allows a standard 2U (3.5-in high) storage array to store up to 24TB, and a full server rack to store up to 500TB.

Seagate’s new drive spins at 7200 rpm, contains four 250GB platters, and has 6Gbit/sec throughput. Like the first generation of the Constellation, the second generation comes with serial SCSI (SAS) connectivity. The updated offering also offers serial ATA (SATA).

“We’re comparing this model to a 10,000-rpm drive in the enterprise, which today has a maximum capacity of 600GB,” said Barbara Craig, Seagate’s senior product marketing manager. “Its performance is about three times that of notebook drive and it’s twice as reliable.”

The SAS model of the Constellation.2 is dual ported for resiliency and sports sequential and random read speeds of up to 115MB/sec; the SATA model has 115MB/sec sequential read speeds but boasts 180MB/sec for random reads. Not only did Seagate double the maximum capacity of the Constellation, but it also increased the entry-level drive capacity from 160GB to 250GB.

The Constellation lags behind Seagate’s 1TB, 3.5″ enterprise-class drive in sequential performance, but blows by it in random reads. The random performance is better on 2.5″ drives because of their smaller disks and denser data.

Sequential Performance (MB/S) is better on 3.5″ drives because of the larger disk capacity and the higher areal density of the drive, Seagate said.

Regardless of the performance in comparison to its 3.5″ drive, Seagate pointed out that its new 2.5″ drive offers far greater space and power savings over its larger cousin. For example, the Constellation.2 offers 72 percent power savings while idle over the 3.5-in drive, or 3.85 watts versus 8 watts while idle, the company added.

Like its predecessor, the Constellation.2 is a self-encrypting drive. The latest model offers an encryption algorithm from AES 128-bit to AES 256-bit.

Sometime next quarter, Seagate is set to announce a Constellation.2 drive that has passed the Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) and is sealed with a tamper-resistant label.

The estimated mean time between failures (MTBF) was also increased with this drive from 1.2 million hours with the previous generation to 1.4 million hours, according to Craig. The Constellation.2 has twice the lifespan of Seagate’s 2.5-in laptop drive, the Momentus.

Final pricing and availability have yet to be announced for the Constellation.