Apple’s Mac App Store to launch on January 6, 2011

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Date: Monday, December 20th, 2010, 08:23
Category: News, Software

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It you’re looking for another way to exchange currency for your Mac apps, Apple’s long-awaited Mac App Store has a delivery date of January 6, 2011.

Per Macworld, the storefront will go online in 90 countries and the storefront, first unveiled in October at Apple’s Back to the Mac event, will aim to offer a parallel experience to the one Apple pioneered in 2008 with its App Store for iOS devices. Users will be able to purchase paid and download free apps in categories like Education, Games, Productivity, Utilities, and more. Any downloaded can be installed on all a user’s personal Macs, and updates are handled by the store. The revenue-sharing deal is the same as with the App Store: developers take 70% of income, with Apple taking the other 30% to cover hosting costs and credit card fees.

In spite of the idea, the Mac App Store has already raised some controversy, with many developers pointing to restrictive rules that would block several popular existing apps from sale and others worrying that it may signal the beginning of a slippery slope towards a locked-down ecosystem similar to iOS devices. On the flipside, some have argued that the Mac App Store may be a good thing for consumers and developers alike, with the former gaining an easy central location to find software for their computer, and the latter getting massive exposure among Mac users.

The Mac App Store will require Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard to install and run and be available as a free download via Software Update.

AT&T secures rights to US$1.9 billion of 4G wireless spectrum licensing, gearing up new network for 2011

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Date: Monday, December 20th, 2010, 08:47
Category: iPhone, News

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Wireless carrier and U.S. exclusive iPhone provider AT&T announced on Monday that it has agreed to purchase US$1.925 billion worth of wireless spectrum from Qualcomm for its forthcoming 4G network.

Per AppleInsider, AT&T has agreed to purchase spectrum licenses from Qualcomm in the lower 700 MHz frequency band. The US$1.925 acquisition is said to bolster AT&T’s ability to provide an advanced 4G mobile broadband service “in the years ahead,” the company said in a press release.

The spectrum being sold to AT&T is currently licensed to FLO TV, but that agreement with Qualcomm is expected to be shut down in March 2011.

The available spectrum acquired by AT&T covers more than 300 million people total nationwide. 12 MHz of lower 700 MHz D and E block spectrum is accessible by more than 70 million people in five of the top 15 metropolitan areas, including New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and San Francisco. The remaining 6 Mhz of lower 700 MHz D block spectrum covers more than 230 million people.

AT&T stated that it intends to deploy the spectrum as “supplemental downlink” once compatible handsets and network equipment are developed. AT&T and Qualcomm anticipate they will close on the sale in the second half of 2011.

While AT&T is still building its own 4G network, expected to launch in mid-2011, the company was recently beaten to the punch by rival Verizon, the company’s 4G long-term evolution network debuted earlier this month, offering 10 times faster download speeds in 38 metropolitan areas and more than 60 commercial airports across the U.S.

AT&T will partner with Alcatel and Lucent to build out its LTE network, which will deliver higher broadband throughput and lower latency than the company’s existing 3G network. But even before AT&T’s 4G launches, the company has touted that its existing 3G network is 20 to 60% faster than its competitors.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and please let us know what you make of this in the comments.

Apple looking to hire additional software engineers to boost iOS navigational features

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Date: Monday, December 20th, 2010, 04:21
Category: News, Software

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A quartet of job postings on its employment web site (1, 2, 3, 4) shows that Apple is looking to hire at least four new employees for its iOS development team. The description for the full-time job based in Santa Clara Valley, Calif., calls for “outstanding engineers to deliver the next generation of Apple products.”

“Seize this ground floor opportunity to help us build the world’s best hosted platforms at massive scale,” it reads.

Per AppleInsider, Apple seeks job candidates with “valuable knowledge” related to the development of navigation software, as well as “deep knowledge of Computational Geometry or Graph Theory.” Candidates are required to have at least 3 years’ experience of developing “high quality, robust software systems.”

The hires, and the mention of navigation software, could signal that Apple is gearing up to build its own personal navigation tools into the iOS mobile operating system. Apple’s chief competitor in the mobile space, Google, introduced its own turn-by-turn software for Android devices over a year ago.

A cloud-based navigation solution could also be a major use for Apple’s new massive data center in North Carolina. Another job listing posted this week for an iOS software engineer notes that it looking for an employee to manage and automate “distributed image processing on a server cluster.”

“The position is with an emerging and rapidly growing product team building software used by millions of Apple customers in rapidly growing markets worldwide,” the description reads. “The candidate will be part of a team that develops and maintains a complex array of global content.”

iOS 4 also includes a video out feature that could allow remote control and display of an iPhone, a feature that has already been taken advantage of by BMW. It’s possible that Apple’s solution could seamlessly integrate turn-by-turn directions with a vehicle using this method.

Apple has also shown interest in developing its own unique mapping solution for the iPhone, with two key acquisitions related to maps: Placebase and Poly9.

In April of this year, Apple began integrating its own databases for location-based services following the release of the iPad and iOS 3.2. Previously, Apple relied on databases maintained by Skyhook Wireless and Google for location services.

The iOS Maps application still relies on Google for map imagery as well as its “Street View,” but the change could signal that Apple plans to rely solely on its own technology in the future. In addition, in 2009, Apple indicated it wanted to hire someone who would help take the iPhone’s Maps application “to the next level,” with the intention of changing how users use Maps and find things.

“We want to do this in a seamless, highly interactive and enjoyable way,” that job listing read. “We’ve only just started.”

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.