Adobe releases Wallaby preview, looking into tool to bridge Flash, HTML5 formats

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Date: Tuesday, March 8th, 2011, 04:44
Category: iPhone, News, Software

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After years of the squabble between Adobe’s Flash format and Apple’s push towards HTML5, Adobe may be developing a product to bridge the two sides. Per Macworld UK, Adobe Systems has released a preview of its Wallaby technology, which enables developers to leverage Flash development skills to build HTML files that can run on systems without the need for the Flash Player, including Apple iOS devices.

Wallaby, which will be offered for free on the Adobe Labs website, helps developers convert a Flash file created in the Flash Professional development tool to HTML. Apple’s iOS, which does not support Flash Player, is the primary use case for Wallaby. Output can also run on WebKit-based browsers like Safari and Chrome, said Tom Barclay, senior product manager for the Adobe Creative Suite business.

“It is an experimental technology that provides a glimpse of innovation that we’re doing around Flash and HTML and showing the investment that we’re making in both technologies we think are important for the long term,” Barclay said. The output of Wallaby enables use of not just HTML but also SVG and CSS, which are related technologies.

Wallaby is an AIR (Adobe Integrated Runtime) application for the Windows and Mac platforms. Developers can convert files to HTML5 via drag-and-drop functionality, Adobe said. Once files have been converted, developers can edit using an HTML editing tool, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, or by hand.

Wallaby was previewed last fall at the Adobe Max conference in Los Angeles. At this point, Adobe cannot indicate a product road map, as the company still is inviting user feedback.

Rumor: Apple to drop glass backing, return to aluminum backing for upcoming iPhone 5 handset

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Date: Tuesday, March 8th, 2011, 04:26
Category: iPhone, Rumor

Problems with scratching, paint mixtures and weight will lead Apple to abandon the glass back introduced in the iPhone 4, according to the Macotakara website. As a result, Apple will reportedly switch back to aluminium, the material used in the original iPhone, for the back of the unit.

The glass back is not the only design element from the iPhone 4 that will be abandoned, according to recent rumours. The problematic steel outer frame, which doubles up as the iPhone 4’s antenna, will also be scrapped after well-documented issues with reception problems suffered by the handset.

Instead, Apple will reportedly use a ‘logo antenna’ design with the antenna situated on the back of the device just under the logo.

The idea behind this is that the antenna could be placed in a special cavity where it would be isolated from other electronic components and therefore protected from anything that could potentially block radio-frequency signals. Per the report, the design will also use a special resin for the logo.

The iPhone 5 is expected to be announced in June at the WorldWide Developers Conference (WWDC). It is expected to support both CDMA and GSM technologies and use an A5 processor, similar to the iPad 2.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple to cut certain products from retail locations, focus on personalized setup services

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Date: Tuesday, March 8th, 2011, 04:38
Category: News

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As much as you love a certain selection in the Apple Store locations, the old stuff has to go.

Per The Loop, Apple reportedly plans to ax some hardware and software products from its store shelves to make room for an expansion of its popular personalized in-store setup service. The lineup includes some of the printers, scanners and potentially hard drives presently on display. Though they will not be directly shown in the store, such peripherals will still be available for sale if a customer requests them.

Apple is also said to drastically cut the number of games it sells in stores. Sources reportedly said that the company will get rid of 32 game titles from its retail locations, leaving each store with only about 8 games on display.

Unlike the hardware, which will still be available for sale, the games will not be available for purchase in Apple stores, as such software is said to not be strong sellers. Customers will reportedly be advised that they can download titles for Mac OS X from the Mac App Store.

In order to expand its personalized setup program, the article stated said that new employees are being hired in some locations. In other stores, the employee that sells a product will be the one to do the setup.

The personal setup service is said to be viewed as an opportunity for Apple to differentiate itself from competitors. With the service, customers are guided through setting up their Mac, signing up for an iTunes account, and given a quick walkthrough of the Mac experience.

In February, it was said that the initial success of the Mac App Store has sped up Apple’s plans to cease all sales of boxed software at its retail stores. The Cupertino, Calif.-based company allegedly plans to rely solely on digital distribution of software, and in the process will clear out space in its retail stores.

The company has also halted retail boxed sales of one of its own major digital products, MobileMe, late last month. The cloud-based syncing service, which costs US$99 a year, is rumored to receive a significant makeover in the near future.

Let us know if you’ve seen anything of this on your end and please let us know what you think of the changes in the comments.