Apple patent describes keyboards with sensors, tactile feedback

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Date: Thursday, May 12th, 2011, 20:47
Category: Patents

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This could be nifty.

Per AppleInsider, Apple has shown interest in creating an advanced keyboard that could provide tactile feedback to users through the inclusion of numerous proximity sensors and air vents on individual keys.

The concept was revealed this week in a new patent application published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The filing, entitled “Input Devices and Methods of Operation,” notes that as physical keyboards get smaller and more compact, they may not offer the same typing experience users prefer.

A smaller keyboard might limit the tactile feedback a user feels on their fingertips while typing. This is as a result of keys that do not travel as far when pressed on, say, a much thinner keyboard.

Apple proposes addressing this issue by placing proximity sensors in each key on a keyboard. These sensors could be used to detect when user input on a key is imminent.

The patent filing describes a system that would “flow air from the input device,” perhaps through openings in the surface of an individual key on a keyboard. This would provide tactile feedback to the user before they make physical contact with the key surface.

This air pressure could be used to apply air pressure against a user’s fingertips, giving tactile feedback even though the key may not move as much as a key on a more traditional keyboard.

In another example, Apple describes a pneumatic system that would be used to “advance the selected key in a direction of actuation in response to detecting user selection.” Through this method, the key would be “pulled away from the user.”

Apple also proposes combining these two methods in a keyboard that would provide initial air resistance to movement of a user’s fingers, and then withdraw a key from the user’s touch.

The application, made public this week, was first filed in November of 2009. The proposed invention is credited to Aleksandar Pance, Michael Sinclair, and Brett Bilbrey.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple TV 4.2.2 update out the door

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Date: Thursday, May 12th, 2011, 03:59
Category: Apple TV, News, Software

A new software update addresses a variety of minor issues for users of the second generation “black box” A4-powered Apple TV. You can install the update on your Apple TV by navigating to Settings -> General -> Update Software and following the directions there.

Per AppleInsider, the update, which is the second minor update to version 4.2, is named 4.2.2, but internally is described as iOS 4.3 build 8F305, addresses a half dozen minor issues:

- Audio: Addresses an issue in which audio is not output when playing some video content.

- Video playback: Addresses an issue in which video is not displayed when playing some content.

- Audio output setting: Adds an audio output setting for switching to 16-bit audio for compatibility with some TVs and AV receivers.

- Live FF/RW improvements: Improves the performance of fast-forwarding and rewinding live events.

- Movie description: Addresses an issue in which the description information is not displayed for some movies.

- YouTube video order: Addresses an issue in which YouTube subscription videos were not ordered by date.

Users of the original, Intel-based Apple TV are still stuck with software update 3.0.1, as that model is now discontinued.

If you’ve tried the update and noticed any major changes, please let us know.

Apple releases iPhoto 9.1.3 update

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Date: Thursday, May 12th, 2011, 02:56
Category: News, Software

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Apple on Tuesday released iPhoto 9.1.3, the latest version of its image organization and editing application. The update, a 112 megabyte download which can be be snagged via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature, offers the following major fix:

- Fixes a problem that could cause some events merged in iPhoto to be split back into multiple events on iOS devices after being synced.

iPhoto 9.1.3 retails for US$49 as part of iLife ’11 and requires Mac OS X 10.6.3 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the update and noticed any changes, please let us know.