Sprint working to replicate slow iPhone 4S data speeds, states that carrier is aware of complaints

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Date: Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 09:06
Category: iPhone, News

The iPhone 4S is new to Sprint.

As such, perhaps growing pains aren’t to be unexpected.

Per CNET, a small but growing number of Sprint customers are complaining of slow data speeds. So slow that Siri and other network-sensitive features won’t work.

These complaints started the same day the iPhone 4S was released and continue until today. A thread at Sprint’s community forums that chronicles the problem has almost 248,000 views and over 1,300 replies and is one of the top forum posts on Sprint’s public message board.

Sprint’s head of product development, Fared Adib stated that the carrier is aware of the complaints, but has not been able to reproduce the slowed data connections some users are reporting. Sprint is reportedly working with Apple to track down the problem, if there is one, and find out whether it is hardware or software-related. Once they have identified a root cause, the two companies can work on a fix. When an update is available, Adib said Sprint will get it out quickly to users who are affected by this problem.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’ve seen the shortcoming on your end, please let us know.

Apple patent points towards improved OLED displays in future iOS devices

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Date: Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 08:08
Category: iPad, iPhone, iPod, News, Patents

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Uncertain about what’s coming down the pipe? Just check the recent patent applications.

Per freepatentsonline, Apple has shown interest in improving the technology behind organic light emitting diodes, or OLED displays, to provide even better battery life for devices like the iPhone and iPad.

Apple’s pursuit of better OLED technology was revealed this week in a new patent application that went public. Entitled “Power Efficient Organic Light Emitting Diode Display,” it describes ways in which an OLED screen could offer improved battery life, particularly when displaying the color white.

The filing notes that OLED screens can operate at lower voltages than traditional displays, like the LCD screens currently found on the iPhone and iPad. This is possible because OLED technology is light emissive rather than light transmissive.

But while OLED can offer some advantages over LCD — including darker blacks, higher contrast ratios, and improved power efficiency — those perks are diminished when an OLED display is used to generate large amounts of white display area.

In order to display a screen that is largely the color white, an OLED panel has to utilize a range of color channels for every pixel on the display. Doing this can be power intensive and make the device inefficient.

“The relative power inefficiency in display white spaces using an OLED display may be particularly problematic in certain contexts,” the filing notes. “For example, certain applications, such as word processing, spreadsheet design and use, database design and use, e-mail, and other business or productivity applications, typically utilize dark or black alphanumeric characters on a white background, such as to simulate writing or printing on a sheet of paper.

“As a result, these applications may cause the display of large expanses of white background with relatively little area devoted to the non-white alphanumeric characters. Such applications, therefore, may make the use of OLED displays unsuitable or undesirably power intensive for battery powered and/or portable electronic devices, such as handheld devices.”

Apple’s proposed solution to this problem would include a transparent OLED display panel positioned in front of a solid white background layer, like a white transflective sheet. The display would also feature an opacity switchable layer located between the OLED panel and the background layer.

“The switchable layer may be switched, in whole or in part, from an opaque or semi-opaque state to a transparent or semi-transparent state,” the application reads. “For example, in one embodiment, the switchable layer may be opaque, e.g. black, in the absence of a current. However, upon application of a current all or part of the switchable layer may be come transparent so that the underlying background layer is visible.”

The combination of a solid white background and an opaque layer that could be made transparent would allow a transparent OLED panel to avoid displaying the color white. By instead utilizing the white background, this could produce the color when appropriate, such as when reading black text on a white background, without consuming battery life to turn the individual OLED pixels white.

The white background could even be used for smaller elements on a screen, and applied even in situations where the entire background isn’t white. In one illustration, Apple shows a list of calendar events on an iPhone, with one tiny element — the selected “List” view — displayed against a white background.

Apple’s proposed invention, made public this week by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, was first filed in April of 2010. It is credited to Daniel William Jarvis, Albert John Golko, and Felix Jose Alvarez Rivera.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple confirms iOS 5 firmware update geared towards addressing iPhone 4S battery life, other issues in the works

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Date: Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 06:43
Category: iPhone, News, Software

When in doubt, work on a firmware update.

Per All Things D, Apple has announced that it has found specific flaws in iOS 5 that can be patched to address the battery life issues some iPhone users have experienced with the new software, noting that an update is planned to address the problem in the next few weeks.

Recently, Apple noted, “A small number of customers have reported lower than expected battery life on iOS 5 devices,” adding, “We have found a few bugs that are affecting battery life and we will release a software update to address those in a few weeks.”

Apple has released an initial beta iOS 5.0.1 build 9a402 to developers to begin testing the new update on iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. The company says the new build “contains improvements and other bug fixes including:

– Fixes bugs affecting battery life.

– Adds Multitasking Gestures for original iPad.

– Resolves bugs with Documents in the Cloud.

– Improves voice recognition for Australian users using dictation.

– Contains security improvements.

– iOS 5.0.1 beta introduces a new way for developers to specify files that should remain on device, even in low storage situations.

Since the release of iOS 5 and the new iPhone 4S, specific users have complained about serious battery life issues, although the problems appear to be tied to different settings, carriers, and usage patterns, making the core problems difficult to diagnose and address.

Apple had reportedly been actively investigating the issues with specific users to determine what fixes could be rolled out to general audiences to broadly resolve the problems.

Some users have discovered specific settings that seemed to be actively consuming battery life, including the automatic date and time setting, iTunes Ping, per-app notification settings, and even the “raise to speak” feature in Siri.

Apple’s latest iPhone 4S uses a much faster A5 processor with twice the graphics cores and a higher clock speed, but the company notes that average talk time, WiFi browsing and audio and video playback should be roughly the same as the previous A4-based iPhone 4, thanks to new technologies including a slightly larger battery.

Apple has historically released between six to ten free updates for iOS between annual major updates, rolling them out to users rapidly as soon as they are available, making it unique among competing mobile platforms.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.