Adobe Reader, Adobe Acrobat Pro updated to 11.0

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Date: Monday, October 15th, 2012, 09:03
Category: News, Software

On Monday, Adobe released version 11.0 of its Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat Pro applications. The updates, which can also be snagged through the Adobe Update Utility, add the following fixes and changes:

- Get forms signed by others: Email your signed PDF form, or send it to others to e-sign using the Adobe EchoSign(R) online service from within Reader XI. Just open a free or paid account.

Improved:
- Comment using the PDF annotator Reader XI comes with a full set of commenting tools. So you can add sticky notes, highlight text, and use lines, shapes, stamps, and a typewriter tool to place comments anywhere on your PDF document.

- Fill out forms Say goodbye to paper forms. Type your responses right on the PDF form, or click through and fill in the form fields. Then save and submit. That’s really all there is to it.

Acrobat Reader 11.0 and Acrobat Pro 11.0 require an Intel-based processor and Mac OS X 10.6.4 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new versions and noticed any differences, please let us know what you think.

Rumor: Apple looking to sever ties, move mobile chip production away from Samsung

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Date: Monday, October 15th, 2012, 07:38
Category: Hardware, Rumor

For some reason, assorted lawsuits between two large tech companies don’t do anything to improve the relationship…

According to the Korea Times, Apple may be doing all it can to cut ties between itself and Samsung.

Though Apple still relies on Samsung for production of its mobile processors, the iPhone maker has apparently made it clear it will no longer use Samsung’s technology, according to an anonymous senior official at the Korean electronics company. The report indicated that the relationship between Samsung and Apple is “now about to become one-dimensional.”

“There are three types of chip clients,” the Samsung source reportedly said. “Some want us to handle everything from chip design, architecture and manufacturing. Some want us to just design and manufacture. Some wants us to just make the chips. Apple is now the third type.”

Samsung did reportedly earn more money for manufacturing the A6 processor for Apple’s iPhone 5 than the company did from building earlier custom chips. But at the moment, Samsung is said to be the only semiconductor manufacturer in the world that can meet Apple’s needs for high volume of chip production in a short period of time.

Apple did not collaborate with Samsung in the development of the A6 processor found in the iPhone 5. While Apple collaborated with Samsung in designing its earlier processors, the new A6 chip marks the first time Apple designed its own ARMv7 core.

The details come soon after Apple was revealed to have hired away former Samsung chip designer Jim Mergard. Prior to his brief stint at Samsung, Mergard designed and developed chips for Advanced Micro Devices for 16 years.

Another report last week also reiterated claims that Apple plans to have future chips built by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., taking away a key component from Samsung. It was said that TSMC could build quad-core 20-nanometer chips for Apple by as early as next year.

Leaked part photo suggests thinner next-gen iMac

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Date: Monday, October 15th, 2012, 06:39
Category: Hardware, iMac, Rumor

The upcoming iMac: It may, in fact, be thinner AND snazzier than the current design.

Per Chinese web site WeiPhone.com and MacRumors, a picture out of the Far East shows what is claimed to be the logic board and internal components for a new, thinner iMac set to be released by Apple in the near future.

The image and purported details about a redesigned iMac show Wi-Fi and Bluetooth antennas, fans, and a hard drive and have been argued to be from a next-gen iMac.



The new iMac will reportedly be considerably thinner than the current model, and the new shell design is said to be curved like a water droplet, rather than squared off.

The report also reaffirmed earlier claims that the new iMac display will be attached to the protective cover glass, allowing the all-in-one desktop to be even thinner.

Inventory of iMac desktops has been constrained at third-party resellers for some time now. Limited stock of hardware through resellers is often one of the first signs that Apple is drawing down inventory ahead of a product refresh.

Apple could unveil a new iMac as soon as this month, as the company is expected to hold a media event on Oct. 23 to unveil a new, smaller iPad with a 7.85-inch display. That event could present an opportunity for Apple to show off a redesigned iMac, as well as a new 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display.

While the new iMac is expected to be redesigned, reports have suggested that the desktop will not receive a high-resolution Retina display. Apple is allegedly set to release a 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display that will join the 15-inch model, but Retina-caliber displays are apparently not yet available for 21.5-inch and 27-inch screens.

It’s possible that if the iMac lineup is refreshed, the 21.5-inch model could become available first, with the 27-inch model to follow soon after. Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities first reported in August that the new screen lamination process for the redesigned iMac is apparently more difficult with the 27-inch model, which could lead to it launching weeks after the 21.5-inch option.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple extends warranty for 2009 iMac, cites known hard drive issue

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Date: Monday, October 15th, 2012, 06:39
Category: hard drive, Hardware, iMac, News

There’s nothing like a quiet warranty extension to put your mind at ease.

Per MacRumors, Apple on Friday quietly extended its iMac 1TB Seagate Hard Drive Replacement Program coverage back two years to include models sold from October 2009, effectively adding almost two years to the initiative which previously included machines sold between May and June of 2011.

News of the extension was posted to Apple’s Support webpage sometime on Friday, which noted email notifications were being sent to affected iMac owners who took the time to register their products. Users can also check the program’s webpage to confirm eligibility.

From the announcement:

Apple has determined that certain Seagate 1TB hard drives used in 21.5-inch and 27-inch iMac systems may fail. These systems were sold between October 2009 and July 2011.

iMac owners who were affected by the Seagate-specific failure can have their hard drives replaced for free from Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider, or those who have already paid for repair or replacement can contact Apple for a possible refund.

First initiated in July 2011, the recall originally ran through July 23, 2012 and covered iMacs sold between May 2011 and July 2011. The program was subsequently extended for an additional year. With Friday’s announcement, the replacement plan has been broadened again, and now covers affected iMacs for three years after the first retail sale of the unit or until April 12, 2013, whichever provides longer coverage.

Seagate’s storage components were at the center of another fiasco in 2007, when Apple acknowledged that a number of MacBook and MacBook Pros shipped with faulty hard drives. An apparent manufacturing flaw caused the drive head of some units to permanently fail, scratching the disk patter and causing permanent data loss.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.