Dropbox updated to 1.6.14

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Date: Tuesday, January 15th, 2013, 10:37
Category: News, Software

An update’s an update.

On Tuesday, Dropbox released version 1.6.14 of its cloud-based storage client for Mac OS X. The new version, a 21.9 megabyte download, which adds the following fixes and changes:
- Fix Icon overlays not updating in OS X.

- Fix not using Growl on Snow Leopard.

- Fix hang on startup on Leopard.

- Upgraded to Growl SDK 1.2.3.

Dropbox 1.6.14 requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new beta and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Fourth-gen Wi-Fi, cellular iPad to arrive alongside iPad mini in China on January 18th

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Date: Tuesday, January 15th, 2013, 08:09
Category: iPad, News, retail

Come Friday, the newest and coolest iPad will be available in China.

Per The Unofficial Apple Weblog, Apple CEO Tim Cook has teased that Wi-Fi + cellular versions would hit China sometime this month, and it looks like January 18 is indeed the magic day. Cellular-capable versions of both the iPad mini and 4th gen iPad with Retina will be offered at Apple retailers and on the web via the Apple Online Store.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’re in/around China and have noticed the 4th-gen iPad or the iPad mini surface, please let us know in the comments.

SquareTrade report reveals where most iPhones meet their demise

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Date: Tuesday, January 15th, 2013, 08:19
Category: iPhone, News

Well, at least now you know where not to take your iPhone.

Per a study published last October by third-party warranty company SquareTrade and The Mac Observer, most damage (51 percent) to an iPhone reportedly occurs in an owner’s home. Of the areas in the home, kitchens are the most likely location for an iPhone to die due to their usually hard floors, heavy traffic, and the abundance of foods and liquids that the device can encounter. It’s also likely that usage models play a role, as many iPhone owners like to listen to music or podcasts while cooking, or look up recipes on the fly.

The living room (18 percent), bathroom (16 percent), and driveway (10 percent) are the next most-likely locations for an accident while the bedroom at 8 percent rounds out the top five “danger zones.”

Some interesting statistics on exactly how iPhones die are also available. A surprisingly low 5 percent of iPhone owners have accidentally washed their iPhone in the washing machine, 9 percent have dropped it in a (hopefully clean) toilet, and 6 percent have left the phone on top of a car and then driven off.

When it comes to iPhones damaged by liquids, 43 percent of liquid damaged phones met their end due to water, 19 percent encountered soda, 12 percent drowned in a farewell pool of beer, and another 12 percent went out thanks to coffee or tea.

Finally, most accidents overall are the fault of the owner, and not a careless child, friend, or coworker. In all, 69 percent of accidents are caused by the owner.

If you have your own tale as to where and how you accidentally destroyed your iPhone, please let us know in the comments.

Rumor: Apple 27-inch Thunderbolt supply running short, may indicate forthcoming upgrade in near future

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Date: Tuesday, January 15th, 2013, 08:39
Category: Hardware, Rumor

thunderboltdisplay

You know that spiffy monitor Apple sells? It might be about to be upgraded.

Per AppleInsider, a number of resellers have run dry of Apple Thunderbolt Display inventory, suggesting the 27-inch monitor may be due for an upgrade, perhaps with a thinner design that takes cues from the latest iMacs.

As of Monday, major resellers Amazon, MacMall, and J&R are all out of stock of the Thunderbolt Display. Stock-outs are often one of the first signs of a forthcoming upgrade to Apple hardware.

At the very least, the Thunderbolt Display is in need of an upgrade to its MagSafe cable. Apple currently ships a MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Converter with every Thunderbolt Display to allow compatibility with the latest MacBooks.

But the Thunderbolt Display and its predecessor, the Cinema Display, have historically borrowed LCD technology from Apple’s all-in-one iMac lineup. And the iMac was recently redesigned with a reengineered display panel that is thinner and reduces glare by 75 percent.

Miroslav Djuric, chief information architect with iFixit, noted that the current-generation Thunderbolt display employs the same screen as the previous generation of 27-inch iMacs: an LG-built TFT active-matrix LCD panel.

“Think of the Thunderbolt display as an iMac minus the computing hardware,” Djuric explained.

If that trend were to continue, an updated Thunderbolt Display would include a thinner LCD panel, and likely an overall thinner design. Apple’s new 21.5-inch iMac actually has the same LCD as its predecessor, but the panel is 5 millimeters thinner, suggesting the same components have been squeezed into a smaller space.

Apple also made its new iMacs thinner by fusing the LCD to the front glass. Djuric said he expects that design decision to also be utilized in a next-generation Apple Thunderbolt Display.

However, if Apple is planning to bring the new iMac panel design to a refreshed Thunderbolt Display accessory, the new big-screen monitor’s arrival may not be imminent because of potential production issues.

Apple’s new 27-inch iMac remains in short supply because of apparent production issues associated with the display. Until those issues are worked out, Apple may not have enough panels to also provide for a new 27-inch Thunderbolt Display.

One report last week claimed that Apple and LG have only been able to produce about 100,000 27-inch iMacs per month. Apple’s online store continues to advertise that new orders of the 27-inch iMac ship in three to four weeks.

Analyst Ming-chi Kuo of KGI Securities was first to reveal in August that Apple was planning to use a new screen lamination process in its redesigned iMacs. Kuo also noted that manufacturing of the panels would be difficult.

Another possible upgrade for the Thunderbolt Display could be its ports: The current model features three USB 2.0 ports, but Apple began offering faster USB 3.0 connectivity on its 2012 Macs, including the redesigned iMac. USB 3 offers transfer rates up to 5 Gbps, compared to just 480 Mbps for USB 2.

The Apple Thunderbolt Display was released in July of 2011, making it the world’s first display compatible with Apple’s high-speed Thunderbolt I/O technology. In addition to the aforementioned MagSafe charging cable and three USB 2.0 ports, the 27-inch screen includes a FaceTime HD video camera, 2.1 speaker system, one FireWire 800 port, a Gigabit Ethernet port, and a Thunderbolt port for daisy chaining up to five additional Thunderbolt devices.

Apple also still continues to sell the previous-generation 27-inch LED Cinema Display for older Macs that have a Mini DisplayPort instead of the newer Thunderbolt port. Both the LED Cinema Display and the Thunderbolt Display are sold for US$999.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.