Google Chrome updated to 27.0.1453.110

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Date: Wednesday, June 5th, 2013, 06:42
Category: News, Software

google-chrome-logo

It was updated again.

And that’s not a bad thing.

On Wednesday, Google released version 27.0.1453.110 of its Chrome web browser. The update, a 50.4 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:
– Medium CVE-2013-2855: Memory corruption in dev tools API.

– High CVE-2013-2856: Use-after-free in input handling.

– High CVE-2013-2857: Use-after-free in image handling.

– High CVE-2013-2858: Use-after-free in HTML5 Audio.

– High CVE-2013-2859: Cross-origin namespace pollution.

– High CVE-2013-2860: Use-after-free with workers accessing database APIs.

– High CVE-2013-2861: Use-after-free with SVG.

– High CVE-2013-2862: Memory corruption in Skia GPU handling.

– Critical CVE-2013-2863: Memory corruption in SSL socket handling.

– High CVE-2013-2864: Bad free in PDF viewer.

– High CVE-2013-2865: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives.

Google Chrome 27.0.1453.110 requires an Intel-based Mac with Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run. If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Apple releases Security Update 2013-002 for Mac OS X 10.6, 10.7 operating systems

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Date: Wednesday, June 5th, 2013, 06:40
Category: News, security, Software

applelogo_silver

There were security updates yesterday.

And we’re still trying to figure out what was specifically changed.

Per The Mac Observer, Apple released security updates for Snow Leopard (OS X 10.6) and Lion (OS X 10.7) on Tuesday, for both the client and server versions of the OSes.

The patch notes for all four updates say precisely nothing, and Apple’s security update page—where security patch notes get released—has not yet been updated with these releases.

Still, if you’re running Mac OS X 10.6 or later, make sure to run the Software Update feature to snag and install the latest updates.

For those of you who like the direct approach, here are the download links for the updates:
About Security Update 2013-002 (Lion) – 57.68MB

About Security Update 2013-002 Server (Lion) – 105.61MB

About Security Update 2013-002 (Snow Leopard) – 329.85MB

About Security Update 2013-002 Server (Snow Leopard) – 404.83MB

If you’ve tried the security updates and noticed any differences, please let us know in the comments.

Intel announces Thunderbolt 2 protocol, looks toward 2013 launch

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Date: Wednesday, June 5th, 2013, 06:33
Category: Hardware, News

thunderboltlogo

This could be really, really sexy.

Per AppleInsider, Intel on Tuesday finally put a name to its next-generation Thunderbolt protocol as “Thunderbolt 2,” with the newly dubbed standard doubling the throughput of its predecessor while remaining backward compatible.

Previously referred to by its codename “Falcon Ridge,” Thunderbolt 2 will boast a bandwidth of 20Gbps, which Intel said is good enough for the simultaneous transfer and display of 4K “Ultra HD” video.

To double the speed, Intel is using a new controller chip that combines the first generation Thunderbolt’s 10Gpbs uni-directional channels into a single 20Gbps bi-directional channel. In addition, Thunderbolt 2 will carry support for DisplayPort 1.2, enabling video streaming to one 4K monitor, or dual QHD displays.

Because the next-generation protocol is, in essence, a modified controller chip, Thunderbolt 2 requires no new cables or accessory hardware, meaning it will be completely backward compatible with existing Thunderbolt products.

While Thunderbolt has yet to see wide adoption outside of Apple’s Mac lineup, Intel claims 30 PCs and motherboards now use the I/O tech. That’s in addition to the 80 peripherals and accessories that made their way to market since Thunderbolt first debuted with Apple’s late-2011 Mac lineup.

Despite being marketed as a cutting-edge interconnect technology targeting professionals in the video field, Apple still does not offer Thunderbolt in its Mac Pro tower.

In a report last week, Intel stated that it plans to extend the standard’s reach beyond the few product that currently use the tech, and has up to now focused on quality over quantity.

The chip maker has yet to nail down a specific date on Thunderbolt 2’s release, but said it should be in production by the end of 2013, with a ramp into 2014.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases Safari 6.0.5 update

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Date: Wednesday, June 5th, 2013, 06:26
Category: News, Software

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Late Tuesday, Apple released Safari 6.0.5, an update to its web browser. The new version, a 342.33 megabyte download (via MacUpdate), includes the following fixes and new features:

– Improves stability for some websites with chat features and games.

Safari 6.0.5 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.8.3 or later to install and run and can also be located and downloaded via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature. If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know.

Apple releases OS X 10.8.4 update

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, June 4th, 2013, 14:40
Category: News, Software

You’ve been waiting for it and it’s here.

On Wednesday, Apple released version 10.8.4 of its OS X Mountain Lion operating system. The new version, a 342 megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:
– Compatibility improvements when connecting to certain enterprise Wi-Fi networks.

– Microsoft Exchange compatibility improvements in Calendar.

– A fix for an issue that prevented FaceTime calls to non-U.S. phone numbers.

– A fix for an issue that may prevent scheduled sleep after using Boot Camp.

– Improved VoiceOver compatibility with text in PDF documents.

– Includes Safari 6.0.5.

OS X 10.8.4 requires an Intel-based Mac running OS X 10.8 to install and run, the update itself being attainable by using OS X’s Software Update feature.

If you’ve tried the new operating system and have any feedback whatsoever, please let us know in the comments.

Rumor: Mass production of second-gen iPad mini could be delayed until November

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Date: Tuesday, June 4th, 2013, 07:45
Category: News

You may have to wait a bit longer for the second-generation iPad mini.

Per Electronista, mass production of a fifth-generation iPad, which was expected to start in July or August, has been delayed a month to November. The reason for the delay is unknown, but it’s speculated that Apple may be staggering the launch of the Mini so it has less of an impact on full-sized iPad sales. Alternately, suppliers may simply be unable to cope with starting Mini production in October.

A problem with starting Mini production in November, though, would be that Apple would likely deprive itself of holiday sales, since it would only have limited units at best by Black Friday, if it wasn’t forced to ship in December or January instead. It would also affect the number of iPads forecast to ship by the end of 2013, which is anywhere between 80 to 100 million units.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Developer finds Facebook apps may be draining batteries too quickly on iOS devices

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Date: Tuesday, June 4th, 2013, 07:40
Category: iOS, News, Software

facebook-app

If your iPhone’s battery life seems to be going the way of the dodo, the Facebook app might be to blame.

Per Cult of Mac, the iOS developer behind Home Remind has published a blog post about the Facebook apps for iPhone, iPad and Facebook Messenger. He says that according to his testing, the Facebook apps consume way more CPU time than is strictly necessary. Excessive CPU time can lead to battery drain.

The developer used Apple’s own Mac-based app, Instruments, to look at what was running on his iPhone, and found that his Facebook app was activating, doing something for ten seconds, then going back to sleep. It did this all day long during his test. He tested the Messenger app and the Facebook iPad app, and found the same pattern.

If that’s the case, the Facebook app is never truly going to sleep and then terminating like a good app. As a result, it’s using up CPU time, and a lot of your battery.

According to the blog post, Facebook is able to do this because it meets the criteria for two types of apps that Apple allows to run in the background: audio apps and voice over IP apps. Facebook apps are operating under these two backgrounding apps privileges, and, as such, are actively chewing up your battery time.

The developer doesn’t say that Facebook is doing this on purpose, and it hoping to make the company aware of the problem, so that they could possibly fix it in an update. Until then, he says, there are only two options.

You can delete the Facebook apps from your iPhone or iPad, and then just use the web version of Facebook, or you can force-quit the app when you’re not using it by double clicking the home button, tapping and holding the Facebook icon in the multitasking bar, and then tapping the little red minus icon. That way, he says, Facebook apps will well and truly be terminated.

If you’ve seen this battery drain on your end or have two cents to throw in on the issue, please let us know in the comments.

iOS 7 home screen picture leaked, begins to show talked-about design differences

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Date: Tuesday, June 4th, 2013, 06:44
Category: iOS, News, Software

It’s not the greatest picture in the world, but it says something as to what iOS 7’s user interface might look like.

The mighty Apple Core, in collaboration with Sonny Dickson, has located a somewhat blurry photo of what might be the upcoming iOS 7 home screen:


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While the photo is lacking in detail, designer Surenix reproduced the fuzzy icons and created the following mockup which provides a peek at what Apple’s new, flatter app icons could look like in iOS 7.

Head on over to the Apple Core for Jason’s full analysis and comparison of the icon between iOS 6 and iOS 7.

Who knows? The “flatter”, more uniform design could work and we’ll have to wait and see come its release.

Apple revises store policies, now offers iPhone 5 display repairs for $149

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Date: Tuesday, June 4th, 2013, 06:29
Category: Hardware, iPhone, News, retail

You’ll soon be able to have your iPhone 5 screen replaced at assorted Apple Store locations for US$149, with or without AppleCare+.

Per MacRumors, changes to Apple’s repair policies first surfaced last month, where a town hall session revealed that Apple would begin in-house repairs of displays in June in an effort to save approximately US$1 billion per year.

The site heard from a tipster this morning that the new repair policy had been implemented and the changes have since been confirmed in a forum post from iPhone repair site Quick iFix. The repairs are available for cracked displays as well as screens that experience multitouch issues.

Quick iFix notes that Apple’s US$149 repair cost is competitive, causing the site to change its own repair costs. Quick iFix charged US$174.99 for a display replacement in early May, but began offering repairs for US$139.99 a few days later.

Apple’s new display repairs are in line with AppleCare+ pricing, which costs US$99 up front and then US$49 for each replacement. The repair service is a more affordable alternative for iPhone users who opted not to purchase AppleCare+, as iPhone replacement previously retailed for US$229.

Apple is expected to roll out additional in-house repair options in July, offering repairs of the iPhone’s camera, sleep/wake buttons, and logic boards. Additional changes to AppleCare are also reportedly in the works, with Apple rumored to be switching to a subscription based plan tied to customers rather than individual devices.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Adobe releases Photoshop CS 6 13.0.5 update

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Date: Tuesday, June 4th, 2013, 06:32
Category: News, Software

adobelogo

A decent update goes a long way.

On Wednesday, Adobe released version 13.0.5 of its Photoshop CS6 image editing program. The new version, a 135.5 megabyte download (via MacUpdate), offers the following fixes and changes:
– When a transformed type layer’s point size is changed, the end result should be as if there was no transform (like CS5).

– When moving a type layer with a free transform active, the size of the font changes to non-integer values.

– Clicking a Pop-up window in a Flash extension panel does not work and/or cause Photoshop to crash.

– Info panel displays incorrect value for adjustment layers inside groups.

– Restore View>Print Size menu command and Zoom tool right-click context menu.

– Legacy actions fail due to layer merge naming change.

– Black-and-White adjustment layer scrubby slider does not work if in a layer group.

– Arrow keys stop working during text edit using the Type tool.

– Custom icons for Flash extension panels are not displayed after changing the Interface color theme.

Photoshop CS6 13.0.5 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6.8 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.