iOS 7 Lock Screen bug discovered, Apple says fix is en route

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Date: Thursday, September 19th, 2013, 15:58
Category: iOS, News, security, Software

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Per Forbes and AllThingsD, the first iOS 7 security bug has appeared and may be worth noting. The bug is currently found in the iOS 7 Lock screen and Control Center implementation that could allow a person to bypass the device’s passcode and access the photo library. This bug is more of a potential security issue as it requires users to both be running their camera app (so it shows up in multitasking) and have Control Center activated for the Lock screen. Here are the steps (which we have independently re-produced):

1) Swipe up from the bottom of the Lock screen to open Control Center.

2) Launch the Clock app.

3) Open the Alarm Clock section of the Clock app.

4) Hold down the power button.

5) Quickly tap Cancel the immediately double-click the Home button.

6) Hold down for a bit longer on the second click.

With access to the photos, users could also share the images to social networks and via email (which could be worrisome). Of course, disabling Control Center access from the Lock screen will completely rid you of this potential security breach, but, either way, Apple will likely get a fix out in the coming weeks.

The hack is demonstrated below:



Apple has also confirmed in a statement to AllThingsD that it is working on a fix for a future software update:

“Apple takes user security very seriously,” Apple spokeswoman Trudy Muller told AllThingsD. “We are aware of this issue, and will deliver a fix in a future software update.”

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Aussie-based tech shop iExperts performs initial teardown of iPhone 5s, reports findings

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Date: Thursday, September 19th, 2013, 14:56
Category: Hardware, iPhone, News

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The Aussies completed an initial teardown of the iPhone 5s and there are some impressive components inside.

Per The Unofficial Apple Weblog and Australia-based tech shop iExperts, the guys at iExperts were able to remove the standard pentalobe screws holding the handset together, then used a suction cup to remove the screen. The team noticed that there’s a special cable that connects the Touch ID sensor on the iPhone 5s to the charging port assembly — not sure of the reason, but some speculation has indicated that it’s for grounding the sensor when the iPhone is docked and charging.

The batteries on the new devices have higher capacities than the one on the iPhone 5 (5.45 Whr), with the iPhone 5s coming in at 5.92 Whr and the iPhone 5c at 5.73 Whr. Those batteries, according to iExperts, are made by Apple Japan, something they’ve never seen before on iPhone batteries.

The logic boards for the new iPhones are quite compact in comparison to the one in the iPhone 5, and iExperts noted that the 5s and 5c boards share a similar design. The team also marveled at the “incredible functionality for such little circuitry” found in the Touch ID sensor on the 5s (below).

If you’re one of those people with an iPhone 4, iPod touch, iPod nano (sixth generation) or iPhone 5 that had a power switch failure, you’ll be happy to know that the switch assembly has been changed in the new iPhones.

The iExperts team will be posting more information on the chips located on the logic board later, so bookmark the page for additional information as it becomes available.

iPhone 5s, 5c preorder deliveries delayed for customers in Australia, Hong Kong and Singapore

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Date: Thursday, September 19th, 2013, 14:37
Category: iPhone, News, retail

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The new iPhone you want might be delayed depending on your location

Per AppleInsider and the Sydney Morning Herald, just after midnight local time, Apple opened sales of their new flagship iPhone 5s and 5c to customers in parts of Asia and Australia, and orders were immediately met with delays of a week or more, pushing deliveries into the next month.

Apple’s new flagship handsets are now available for purchase from the company’s online store in Australia, Hong Kong, and Singapore. iPhone 5c, which has been available for preorder since Sept. 13, shows shipping lead times of 1 to 3 business days in all three countries.

iPhone 5s, which is said to face severe supply constraints, is shown with lead times of 7 to 10 business days in Australia. Hong Kong and Singapore list shipping dates for the handset simply as “October.”

It’s believed that limited supplies may be due to low yields of the new Touch ID fingerprint sensor, prompting Apple to not offer preorders of its latest flagship handset.

Although Apple has not released preorder numbers for the iPhone 5c — much to investors’ chagrin — a spokeswoman for Australian carrier Vodafone, one of Apple’s launch partners, stated that preorders were “going well as expected.” Analysts believe that Apple could sell as many as 8 million of the new handsets over the coming weekend.

Customers in the new iPhones’ other launch countries — Canada, China, France, Germany, Japan, Puerto Rico, the U.S. and the U.K. — can purchase the devices at an Apple retail store starting at 8:00 am local time on Friday, and the phones are also available from Apple’s carrier partners.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’ve experienced this delay via your iPhone 5s or 5c preorder, please let us know in the comments.

Four privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately

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Date: Thursday, September 19th, 2013, 00:11
Category: iOS, iPad, iPhone, privacy

Data backed up? Check.

iOS 7 installed? Check.

Data restored? Check.

Life is good and time to fire up your favorite iTunes Radio station, right?

Not so fast.

Before diving into the beautiful, parallaxy, candy-colored world that is iOS 7, you need to adjust your privacy settings on your iPhone or iPad. If you like your Privacy, that is. Installing iOS 7 is pretty easy and, even if you don’t back up your data ahead of time, it will usually put everything back right where it belongs.

Simple, right?

Well yes, that’s how iOS 7 is designed to work. But don’t let Apple’s thin Helvetica Neue and and serene, dynamic wallpapers lull you into complacency. A whole number iOS upgrade is a big deal and it resets a bunch of your settings and adds privacy and security settings that you should be aware of.

Apple hides its System Services settings all the way down at the bottom of the Privacy > Location Services panel. If you’ve owned your iPhone for more than a few months you’ll have dozens (possibly over one hundred) apps listed on this screen, making it a very long scroll. If you actually make it to the bottom of the list (most people don’t) you’ll see the fabled System Services setting and the explanation of what that little purple arrow icons means.

Again, the path is Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services:

Privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately - Jason O'Grady

Learn this screen and commit the meanings of the three little arrow icons to memory. Then notice when they appear in the top right of your iOS menu bar and come back to Settings > Privacy > Location Services to see which apps are using your location data. Audit this screen frequently to disable location access for apps that don’t need it.

Then touch System Services to reveal the most important privacy settings on your iPhone or iPad.

  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services

Privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately - Jason O'Grady

I recommend turning OFF the following:

  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services > Diagnostics & Usage
  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services > Location-Based iAds
  • Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services > Frequent Locations

Diagnostics & Usage

This setting monitors everything you do on your iPhone and “anonymously” sends it to Apple for “improving iOS.” Whatever. It’s just like when all the major software companies changed their install screens from “send usage data?” to “customer experience program” or some such nonsense. If you leave the “Diagnostics & Usage” option on, you’re giving Apple permission to monitor and record everything you do on your device.

Location-Based iAds

iAds created it’s own privacy uproar in June 2010 when a 45-page update to Apple’s privacy policywhich detailed how your location information could be used to allow the company – and their “partners and licensees” – to “collect, use, and share precise location data, including the real-time geographic location of your Apple computer or device.” The privacy policy has been toned down quite a bit since then and Apple posted a knowledge base article titled “How to opt out of interest-based ads from the iAd network.” I turn this off and am happy with “less relevant” ads being shown.

Frequent Locations

Frequent Locations is equally bad, if not more so. There was a big stir about this when iOS 7 beta 5 was released, and the data it captures about your whereabouts can be downright creepy. For many it brought back memories of the Locationgate fiasco from iOS 4 in April 2011 when a database of Wi-Fi hotspots and cell towers around your current location known as “Consolidated.db” was discovered on iOS 4 devices — and the computers they’re backed up to. Note that the iPhone 4 (and earlier) do not support the “Frequent Locations” feature in iOS 7.

Advertising

Next navigate to the iOS Advertising Privacy settings (Settings > Privacy > Advertising).

Here, you should do three things:

  1. Turn ON “Limit Ad Tracking”
  2. Touch “Reset Advertising Identifier” (which I wrote about in January 2013), and
  3. Touch “Learn More” and learn about what an “Advertising Identifier” is

Privacy settings you should enable in iOS 7 immediately - Jason O'Grady

Safari

Navigate to the iOS Safari Settings (Settings > Safari) turn on the following:

  • Block Pop-ups
  • Do Not Track*
  • Block Cookies is set to “From third parties and advertisers”
  • Fraudulent Website Warning

*Apple’s one of the few companies that still supports the aging Do Not Track standard in its mobile Web browser. Even if it is considered dead (my ZDNet colleague Ed Bott called it “worse than a miserable failure,”) I turn it on anyway, for the few web servers that actually respect it.

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While you’re at it it doesn’t hurt to touch “Clear History” and “Clear Cookies and Data” now and again.

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