Intel, partners looking to manufacture 64-bit mobile processors

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Date: Thursday, October 31st, 2013, 10:30
Category: Hardware, News, Processors

Never doubt the power of the mobile processor business.Intel-logo

According to Forbes, at the ARM developers conference today, Intel partner Altera announced that the world’s largest semiconductor company will fabricate its ARM 64-bit chips starting next year. The announcement sent shockwaves through the technology industry as Intel is desperately trying to break ARM’s supremacy in the mobile market. Unlike Intel, ARM Holdings of the U.K. doesn’t manufacture chips but its designs are licensed and used worldwide in the mobile industry.

“It’s huge. Imagine ARM’s most powerful and technologically advanced 64-bit processor built on Intel’s leading-edge fabs. A duo that will be hard to beat,” explains Nathan Brookwood, principal analyst at Insight 64.

But this is just the beginning of a much larger endeavor for the chip giant as Intel is even willing to compete with semiconductor foundry leader TSMC for the business of its fiercest rivals, like Nvidia or Qualcomm.

“Intel will build Apple’s, Qualcomm’s Snapdragon or the Nvidia Tegra for the right price. Now, the question is, are they ready to pay that premium [to ARM] and feed their direct competitor? But that would actually make business sense for everyone,” adds Brookwood.

With Intel ready to open up its leading-edge factories to whomever is willing to pay a premium, chip prices could actually come down, with the other foundries (TSMC, UMC, GlobalFoundries, Samsung, IBM or SMIC) feeling the pressure to compete.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

FAA to allow airplane mode use of electronic devices during all phases of flights

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Date: Thursday, October 31st, 2013, 10:41
Category: News

faalogo

It’s all about the airplane mode.

Per AppleInsider, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration announced on Thursday that by the end of the year passengers will be allowed to use portable electronic devices, such as Apple’s iPhone and iPad, from gate to gate as long as they are kept in airplane mode.

The rule change will allow passengers to be able to read e-books, play games, and watch videos during all phases of flight, including takeoff and landing, with very limited exceptions. Previously, passengers had to wait until their plane was at a high enough altitude before they could turn on their devices.

The FAA will require that electronic items, books and magazines be held or put in the seat-back pocket during actual takeoff and landing. Cell phones must be kept in airplane mode or have cellular service disabled, and they will not be able to be used for cellular voice calls.

If a carrier offers Wi-Fi service during a flight, that may be accessed. In addition, short-range Bluetooth connections are also allowed.

“We believe today’s decision honors both our commitment to safety and consumer’s increasing desire to use their electronic devices during all phases of their flights,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “These guidelines reflect input from passengers, pilots, manufacturers, and flight attendants, and I look forward to seeing airlines implement these much anticipated guidelines in the near future.”

So, airplane mode happy device-usage, you crazy gatos!!!

Apple support document acknowledges late-2013 13-inch Retina Display MacBook Pro input issues, promises fix

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Date: Thursday, October 31st, 2013, 10:37
Category: MacBook Pro, News, Software

elretina2

It’s not the easiest thing being an early adopter.

Per Macworld, an Apple support document posted on Wednesday stated that the input devices on the brand spanking new MacBook Pro may become “unresponsive,” which is a fancy way of saying “no worky so good.” Fortunately, you only need those for little tasks like controlling your computer, so no big deal. The 15-inch MacBook Pro seems to be unaffected, so if you decided to opt for one of those, good on you.

The company’s working on an update that should fix this tantrum-like behavior, but in the meantime, Apple suggests that those who run into this issue close the computer’s display for around a minute, and then open it again. Which I guess is the 21st century equivalent of “Have you tried restarting it?”