iFixit posts their Mac Pro teardown

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Date: Friday, January 3rd, 2014, 09:54
Category: Apple, Hardware, Mac Pro, Take Apart, Thunderbolt

RtFlKRIVD1AnbWMo.mediumGadget teardown specialists, iFixit, have completed their full disassembly of the new Mac Pro and have given it an 8 out of 10 on the repairability scale. So what else did they find out? Best to head on over there for the full details (24 steps for the full take-apart), but here are a few of the juicy details (cherry-picked from the iFixit run-down);

  • it has taken some design pointers from the AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule bodies: a thin, vertical design with individual boards on separate sides.
  • simply sliding the lock switch allows us to remove the outer casing of the Mac Pro. No stubborn pentalobe screws here!
  • The RAM in the Mac Pro Late 2013 is easily accessible and replaceable.
  • it is vented by a single fan, which pulls air from under the case, through the core, and out the top of the case.
  • it utilizes a giant triangular heat sink (“Thermal Core”), shared by the dual graphics cards and CPU.
  • the new graphics cards may be the key to Apple finally undercutting homebrew systems on a pure power basis.
  •  a CPU upgrade appears entirely possible.
  • The power supply has no dedicated cooling, and relies on the main system fan to keep cool—allowing the Mac Pro to idle at a whisper-quiet 12 dBA.
  • Non-proprietary Torx screws are used throughout, and several components can be replaced independently.

In spite of the lack of internal, user-upgradeable disk space, the new Mac Pro is a far cry from the iMac which has gotten more and more difficult to do at-home repairs or upgrades upon. Here’s hoping that Apple plans to offer some internal component upgrade paths.

Prescription frames for Glass start at $99 and available soon

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Date: Friday, January 3rd, 2014, 09:28
Category: Accessory, Announcement, Consumer Electronics, Gadget, Wearables

Screenshot 2014-01-02 23.59.00We’ve talked quite a bit about Google Glass recently, and I even had a chance to drive it around the block a bit thanks to Jason O’Grady. One of my biggest problems with Glass, somewhat ironically, is that I already wear a pair of glasses which made for very awkward placement of the Glass frame on my face. Without my glasses, it was a strain to look at the tiny display hovering over my eye. According to Slash Gear, however, the solution to this problem may not be far away with prices starting at $99.

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Prototype iPhone nabs $1500 on eBay

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Date: Friday, January 3rd, 2014, 08:30
Category: Apple, Hardware, iOS, iPhone, News, Sighting

iphone-originalAnybody remember the original iPhone? I do, I had one and I think it’s still my favorite design of all of them so far. The body was aluminum, except for a section at the bottom which was plastic so as not to interfere with reception, all rounded edges, and a nice chrome bezel around the glass face. The original iOS (then iPhone OS) seems dated now with no folders, no select/copy/paste, and at the beginning NO APPS except the Apple ones, if you can imagine that. Well  it seems some intrepid person got their hands of one of the prototypes for the first iPhone and sold it pretty quickly on eBay for a measly $1500. That’s only the price of three subsidized iPhones now, and two unlocked ones. Not long ago, an original Apple I (one of the ones built in Steve Job’s garage) sold for $671,400, and an original Apple II for $6,100. Apparently the device didn’t have an actual OS on it, at least not like the public would eventually see, just a bunch of apps designed to run the iPhone through a battery of tests. For some images of the pre-iPhone iPhone (grabbed from the now expired eBay auction), head over to Redmond Pie to see what the fuss is about.