Tired of using English on your Mac? Try Klingon!

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Date: Thursday, February 6th, 2014, 09:44
Category: Desktop Mac, Fun, How-To, User Interface

Klingon_EmpireI ran across this tidbit on FairerPlatform, but I really should have already known this already (shame on me). Among the many languages your Mac can support and display, such as Latvian, Russian, and Swahili; believe it or not, it can also do Klingon, the well known warrior race from Star Trek. To use the Klingon language on your Mac, go to System Preferences > Language & Region and, under the “Preferred Languages” box, click the “+” (plus) button. Then scroll down, until you find “tlhlngan Hol” (Klingon). Then select it and click add. The Mac will ask if you want to use Klingon or English as the primary language. Before that, however, you’ll need to download the appropriate fonts to install on your computer. Just make sure you know how to actually read Klingon or know your way back to the language preferences first. If you want to learn Klingon, you can find a number of books on the subject on Amazon, and there are even Klingon dictionary apps for your iPhone on the App Store. FairerPlatform also found a link to a review for a Klingon keyboard, but apparently they were all recalled to the home planet of Qo’noS, because they can no longer be found anywhere (probably in part because it could only use a PS2 port). Don’t expect the PowerPage to go Klingon, at least not for another 250 years or so.

Qapla’!

Critical update for Flash released

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Date: Thursday, February 6th, 2014, 09:56
Category: Hack, Mac, Malware, News, security, Software, Windows

adobe-flash-playerEarlier it was Java, now it has been discovered that Adobe’s Flash software also has a vulnerability that gives complete control over compromised systems to hackers. This vulnerability, fixed in the just released version 12.0.0.44, affects Adobe Flash Player 12.0.0.43 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh and Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.335 and earlier versions for Linux, although Linux was listed as having a lower priority rating. Adobe has detailed the problem in a security bulletin. All users are recommended to update Flash on their computers, as well as Google’s Chrome browser which has it’s own Flash component. The version of Chrome that includes this fix is 32.0.1700.107 and should update this automatically, but you may have to restart the browser for the correct version to register in the “About Google Chrome” window. If you want to check which version you are running before going through the update process, you can go to this page on Adobe’s site. You can download OS specific installers from here. Windows users who browse the Web with anything other than Internet Explorer will need to apply two Flash updates, one for IE and one for any alternative browsers (Firefox, Opera, e.g.). Both updaters can be found on the download page. On a Mac, if you already have Flash installed, you can also go to the Flash Player settings in System Preferences and click on the Check for Updates button in the Advanced tab. Our friends at Kaspersky Labs make another appearance in the Acknowledgements of the security bulletin where Adobe thanks them for discovering the vulnerability;

“Adobe would like to thank the following individuals for reporting the relevant issues and for working with Adobe to help protect our customers:

Alexander Polyakov and Anton Ivanov of Kaspersky Labs (CVE-2014-0497)”

So if you’ve got the time now, and you probably should make the time, get those updaters downloaded and installed. Almost makes you want to remove both Java and Flash doesn’t it?

Satya Nadella named as new Microsoft CEO

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Date: Thursday, February 6th, 2014, 08:40
Category: Announcement, Business, Microsoft

Satya-NadellaAfter a long guessing game about who would be the next CEO, Microsoft finally announced Tuesday that it was appointing Satya Nadella to the post and adding him as a member of the Board of Directors. Nadella, who has been at Microsoft for 22 years, previously held the position of Executive Vice President of Microsoft’s Cloud and Enterprise group. He is replacing Steve Ballmer, who has held the position of CEO for 13 years following Bill Gates’ transition from CEO to Chairman of Microsoft’s Board of Directors in 2000. Ballmer will now take a position on the Board of Directors. Gates, meanwhile, makes another title change as he relinquishes his Chairman position to John Thompson and goes on to assume the role on the Board as Founder and Technology Advisor. There is still plenty of guessing and speculation to go around as everyone waits to see what possible fallout results from the announcement. Many speculate that some of Microsoft’s executives, who were in the running to take a seat in the CEO chair, may move on to jobs outside of Microsoft now that the decision is made. Also of interest will be Nadella’s vision for Microsoft now that he is in the driver’s seat.