Safari Technology Preview 2.0 released, available for download and testing

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Date: Wednesday, April 13th, 2016, 16:53
Category: Developer, News, security, Software

safari-preview

If you’re interested in what’s on the horizon via Safari’s upcoming versions, you’re going to like this.

Apple released Safari Technology Preview version 2.0 today. The updated browser lets you play around with a slew of upcoming technologies and offers the following fixes and changes:

Browser Differences:
– Changed the CFBundleSignature to allow Apple Events, like those sent from AppleScript, to correctly distinguish between Safari and Safari Technology Preview.

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USB Implementers Forum draws up certification, verification program for USB-C cables, devices

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Date: Wednesday, April 13th, 2016, 09:40
Category: Accessory, Hardware, News, USB-C

My love-hate relationship with Apple's new USB-C port

USB-C is coming along and a lot of nice things are being said about the technology, but there hasn’t been a ton of verification and certification, especially among cheaper cables.

This may change soon.

Under its new program, the USB Implementers Forum will test and certify USB-C cables, chargers, and other devices. End-user products — such as computers and mobile phones — will be able to cryptographically verify that the cable or charger to which it is connected has been certified and has not been tampered with.

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FBI may have contacted “grey hat” hacker group along with Cellebrite to unlock San Bernadino iPhone 5c

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Date: Wednesday, April 13th, 2016, 08:56
Category: Hacks, iOS, iPhone, Legal, News, security, Software

lockediphone5c

The plot continues to thicken.

A group of unnamed sources cited by the Washington Post contradict the widely-held belief that it was Israel-based mobile forensics company Cellebrite which helped the FBI hack into the locked San Bernardino iPhone. The report say that the agency was instead approached by a group of freelance hackers who revealed an iPhone passcode vulnerability to the FBI in return for a one-time fee.

The researchers, who typically keep a low profile, specialize in hunting for vulnerabilities in software and then in some cases selling them to the U.S. government. They were paid a one-time flat fee for the solution.

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