3D DeskCam Could Scan Facial Features for Login

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Date: Thursday, March 29th, 2007, 15:33
Category: News

bioscrypt.jpg
In “hey, that might be pretty cool when it comes out” news, Toronto-based Bioscrypt has announted that its 3.5″ tall, half-inch wide 3D DeskCam could scan the user’s face and authenticate access to a computer using this method.
Using an infrared system, the camera uses approximately 40,000 identification points along a person’s face according to ZDNet’s Security Blog. The unit focuses on a user’s forehead, eye sockets and nose bridge and can differentiate identical twins and professional face molds according to Ryan Zlockie, Bioscrypt’s director of product management.
The camera can also differentiate casual changes, such as if a user hasn’t shaven their facial hair for a few days. A user who undergoes an extensive change, such as plastic surgery, will have to reregister with the system.
Applicable uses for the camera currently include security, identification and creating a 3D avatar for interactive applications such as instant messaging and multiplayer gaming.
The 3D DeskCam is scheduled to be released in the second half of 2007 with a target price of US$350. This price could be reduced to around US$200 if produced in larger volumes.
No word of Macintosh drivers have been released to date.


bioscrypt.jpg
In “hey, that might be pretty cool when it comes out” news, Toronto-based Bioscrypt has announted that its 3.5″ tall, half-inch wide 3D DeskCam could scan the user’s face and authenticate access to a computer using this method.
Using an infrared system, the camera uses approximately 40,000 identification points along a person’s face according to ZDNet’s Security Blog. The unit focuses on a user’s forehead, eye sockets and nose bridge and can differentiate identical twins and professional face molds according to Ryan Zlockie, Bioscrypt’s director of product management.
The camera can also differentiate casual changes, such as if a user hasn’t shaven their facial hair for a few days. A user who undergoes an extensive change, such as plastic surgery, will have to reregister with the system.
Applicable uses for the camera currently include security, identification and creating a 3D avatar for interactive applications such as instant messaging and multiplayer gaming.
The 3D DeskCam is scheduled to be released in the second half of 2007 with a target price of US$350. This price could be reduced to around US$200 if produced in larger volumes.
No word of Macintosh drivers have been released to date.

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