Apple and EMI to Start Selling DRM-Free Music

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Date: Monday, April 2nd, 2007, 11:15
Category: News

itunesblue.jpg
On Monday, Apple Inc. and EMI announced that beginning in May, the two firms will begin selling digital rights management-free music.
These files will be available at a higher audio quality (256 kbps AAC format as opposed to 128 kbps AAC format) at a higher price of US$1.29 per song according to Macworld News. Apple currently charges US$0.99 per song on the iTunes Store.
During the event, Apple CEO Steve Jobs commented that users would have a choice between the standard DRM-encoded songs and the higher-quality DRM-free tracks, which would supplement the Apple Store’s current selection. Users who already owned EMI-based tracks could upgrade these songs for US$0.30 per song should they wish to do son.
Earlier this year, Jobs sent out an open letter pushing for the removal of digital rights management code from music purchased from online stores such as the iTunes Store. EMI seems to be the first major music label to follow through on this, a point Jobs specifically commented on.
“Hopefully, by our actions here today and over the coming months they will conclude that we are continuing to do exactly what has earned us these number one positions — doing the right thing for the customer,” said Jobs. “The right thing for the customer going forward is to tear down the walls that preclude interoperability by going DRM free. That starts here today.”
A big step no matter how you look at us. If you have an opinion about this, let us know.


itunesblue.jpg
On Monday, Apple Inc. and EMI announced that beginning in May, the two firms will begin selling digital rights management-free music.
These files will be available at a higher audio quality (256 kbps AAC format as opposed to 128 kbps AAC format) at a higher price of US$1.29 per song according to Macworld News. Apple currently charges US$0.99 per song on the iTunes Store.
During the event, Apple CEO Steve Jobs commented that users would have a choice between the standard DRM-encoded songs and the higher-quality DRM-free tracks, which would supplement the Apple Store’s current selection. Users who already owned EMI-based tracks could upgrade these songs for US$0.30 per song should they wish to do son.
Earlier this year, Jobs sent out an open letter pushing for the removal of digital rights management code from music purchased from online stores such as the iTunes Store. EMI seems to be the first major music label to follow through on this, a point Jobs specifically commented on.
“Hopefully, by our actions here today and over the coming months they will conclude that we are continuing to do exactly what has earned us these number one positions — doing the right thing for the customer,” said Jobs. “The right thing for the customer going forward is to tear down the walls that preclude interoperability by going DRM free. That starts here today.”
A big step no matter how you look at us. If you have an opinion about this, let us know.

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