Apple May Transition iPod Line to Flash-Based Memory by End of 2007

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Date: Thursday, February 8th, 2007, 09:12
Category: News

blackipod.jpg
According to an article on AppleInsider, Apple Inc. may move away from its hard disk-based iPod units to solid-state NAND-type flash memory by the end of 2007.
The article cites a report from Prudential Equity Group Analyst Jesse Tortora, who mentions that the move would allow for a smaller form factor, a more diverse model mix and improvements to both the battery life and durability of the units.
Tortora also pointed out that while Flash-based memory is clearly more expensive on a dollar to gigabyte ratio than hard disk drives, the advantages provided by the medium outweigh the cost. The analyst wrote that he sees Flash-based drives with capacities up to 32 gigabytes as feasible, although the question as to whether 32 gigabytes could adequately store video has arisen.
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blackipod.jpg
According to an article on AppleInsider, Apple Inc. may move away from its hard disk-based iPod units to solid-state NAND-type flash memory by the end of 2007.
The article cites a report from Prudential Equity Group Analyst Jesse Tortora, who mentions that the move would allow for a smaller form factor, a more diverse model mix and improvements to both the battery life and durability of the units.
Tortora also pointed out that while Flash-based memory is clearly more expensive on a dollar to gigabyte ratio than hard disk drives, the advantages provided by the medium outweigh the cost. The analyst wrote that he sees Flash-based drives with capacities up to 32 gigabytes as feasible, although the question as to whether 32 gigabytes could adequately store video has arisen.
“Apple currently offers 30GB and 80GB HDD-based models, and will have the option to increase storage capacity up to 120GB this year based on new perpendicular recording technology,” Tortora wrote. “While the higher capacities would allow for more video storage, we view battery life as the key consideration for a move to flash.”
The report cites that while a 30 gigabyte hard drive-based iPod can provide about 40 hours of video content, it currently only allows about 3.5 hours of battery life for video playback. A Flash-based model would boost video playback by about 60% to allow for 5.5 hours of playback time.
Other advantages to the conversion cited in Tortora’s report would include a next generation’s video iPod to include a touch screen, WiFi capability and GPS functionality.
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