Apple Requires a “Direct Signature” for all Hardware

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Date: Thursday, November 2nd, 2006, 03:00
Category: Hardware

pre-sign-for-this-shipment.pngApple offers a new delivery option when ordering from their online store. After your order is processed an option is available to “pre-sign” for your shipment. The only problem is that FedEx won’t accept a such a form to leave your package.
It works like this: after you place the order, you can click on a link on Apple’s order status page to “Pre-sign for this shipment.” It takes you to a page that instructs you to accept the terms and conditions outlined below. You are then be presented with a Shipment Release Authorization form which you must print, sign and attach to your door prior to delivery.

Terms and Conditions
I understand that Apple requires signatures acknowledging receipt of delivered goods. By signing the Shipment Release Authorization form, I hereby authorize Apple’s carrier to leave my package at the address I have specified for delivery when placing my order. I understand that, in so doing, I assume the risk of any loss, theft, or destruction, and release Apple and its carriers from all liability that may result from, leaving the package where I have indicated on the Shipment Release Authorization form.

The problem is that FedEx considers a Shipment Release Authorization form an “indirect signature” because a live human did not sign for the package at the time of delivery. According to two FedEx representatives that I spoke to Apple specifically requires a “direct signature” for all their packages, no exceptions. So Apple appears to be sending mixed messages, telling FedEx that they require a direct signature but telling customers that they’ll accept an indirect signature.
Shippers of valuable hardware need to protect themselves from fraud, especially in light of the recent theft-in-transit scams that are plaguing technology companies.
It’s worth noting the discrepancy in signature policies in case you’re waiting for a special delivery from Apple.


pre-sign-for-this-shipment.pngApple offers a new delivery option when ordering from their online store. After your order is processed an option is available to “pre-sign” for your shipment. The only problem is that FedEx won’t accept a such a form to leave your package.
It works like this: after you place the order, you can click on a link on Apple’s order status page to “Pre-sign for this shipment.” It takes you to a page that instructs you to accept the terms and conditions outlined below. You are then be presented with a Shipment Release Authorization form which you must print, sign and attach to your door prior to delivery.

Terms and Conditions
I understand that Apple requires signatures acknowledging receipt of delivered goods. By signing the Shipment Release Authorization form, I hereby authorize Apple’s carrier to leave my package at the address I have specified for delivery when placing my order. I understand that, in so doing, I assume the risk of any loss, theft, or destruction, and release Apple and its carriers from all liability that may result from, leaving the package where I have indicated on the Shipment Release Authorization form.

The problem is that FedEx considers a Shipment Release Authorization form an “indirect signature” because a live human did not sign for the package at the time of delivery. According to two FedEx representatives that I spoke to Apple specifically requires a “direct signature” for all their packages, no exceptions. So Apple appears to be sending mixed messages, telling FedEx that they require a direct signature but telling customers that they’ll accept an indirect signature.
Shippers of valuable hardware need to protect themselves from fraud, especially in light of the recent theft-in-transit scams that are plaguing technology companies.
It’s worth noting the discrepancy in signature policies in case you’re waiting for a special delivery from Apple.

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