Mylo, Yet Another Gizmo to Lug Around

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, August 9th, 2006, 09:00
Category: Gadget

mylo-250.jpgWired reports:
Hoping to tap into the growth of wireless networks across college campuses, other public spaces and within homes, Sony is introducing a new pocket-sized gadget for instant messaging and other internet-based communications.
The Sony mylo, slated for availability in September at a retail price of about $350, is a first-of-its-kind product that uses Wi-Fi networks, analysts say. It is not a cellular phone and thus doesn’t carry monthly service fees. And though it could handle web-based e-mail services, it doesn’t support corporate e-mail programs.
Instead, the slim, oblong-shaped gizmo that has a 2.4-inch display and slides open to expose a thumb keyboard specifically geared toward young, mainstream consumers for messaging and internet-based calls. As long as a Wi-Fi network is accessible, a mylo user could chat away or browse the web.
The mylo — which stands for “my life online,” — will be marketed toward 18-24 year-olds, the multitasking generation that relies heavily on instant messaging and is already viewing e-mail as passe, Sony said.
Sony has partnered with Yahoo and Google to integrate their instant-messaging services, and is looking to expand mylo’s support to other services as well, most notably the leading messaging provider, America Online.
Read more…
(Contributed by Brett Jordan)

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WWDC Leopard Sneak Peek Highlights

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Date: Wednesday, August 9th, 2006, 00:01
Category: Opinion

New Open Source Announcements
Open Source Product Manager Ernest Prabhakar announced a broad new initiative that includes buildable Intel kernel source. Thank you, and please note Tom Yager was as completely full of hot air as I had suggested. No vast conspiracy afoot, just a delay involved with rolling out Leopard and the Intel platform.
Prabhakar also announced a new, open calendar server under the Apache license, a direct blow to Microsoft Exchange Server. The iCal Server, along with Bonjour and Launchd will be supported in a new Mac OS X centric, open development website called Mac OS Forge.
Leopard feature overview
Leopard Server feature overview
Contributed by: Daniel Eran, RoughlyDrafted.com

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WWDC: Mac Pro, Intel Xserve, Leopard

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Date: Monday, August 7th, 2006, 13:00
Category: WWDC

At Apple’s World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco today CEO Steve Jobs announced two new pieces of hardware:
Mac Pro
– Two 2.66GHz Dual-Core Intel Xeon “Woodcrest” processors
– 4MB shared L2 cache per processor
– 1.33GHz dual independent frontside buses
– 1GB memory (667MHz DDR2 fully-buffered DIMM ECC)
– NVIDIA GeForce 7300 GT graphics with 256MB memory
– 250GB Serial ATA 3Gb/s 7200-rpm hard drive
– 16x double-layer SuperDrive (DVD+R DL/DVD±RW/CD-RW)
– US$2,499
Press release
Product page
Apple store page
Xserve
– Two 64-bit 2.0GHz Dual-Core Intel Xeon processors
– 1.33GHz frontside bus and 4MB shared L2 cache per processor
– 1GB memory (667MHz DDR2 ECC fully buffered DIMM)
– 80GB 7200-rpm Serial ATA hard drive
– Built-in ATI Radeon X1300 graphics with 64MB RAM
– Mac OS X Server 10.4 Unlimited-Client Edition
– Starting at US$2,999
– Available in October
Press release
Product page
- Apple store page

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Leopard Predictions for WWDC 2006

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Date: Friday, August 4th, 2006, 08:00
Category: WWDC

indextop20050412.pngWhat will Apple announce at WWDC06? There will no doubt be some surprises, but here are some well known inevitabilities, some reasonable possibilities for new apps, new UI, and new hardware, and a few commonly repeated ideas that – sorry – have no chance!
Known Inevitabilities
First and most obviously, Apple will finish features previewed or suggested in Tiger. Here’s a list of things that are known:
Quartz 2D Extreme will provide hardware accelerated 2D drawing, speeding the display of everything on the screen. Apple already delivered 3D acceleration, but had only finished Quartz 2D, the basic replacement to Classic Mac QuickDraw, in Tiger. By offloading more drawing functions to the graphics card, performance increases overall.
Resolution independence enables users to set a resolution multiplier to make windows and icons appear larger or smaller at the same resolution. This feature allows use of higher resolution screens with denser pixels, without making the interface items too small.
Apple included initial elements of Resolution independence in Tiger, but didn’t expose the technology for users. The Quartz Debug app included in Tiger’s Developer Tools includes a preview for testing purposes.
This is different than simply bumping up the size of text or window controls; it requires support from developers, because much of the custom UI in an app is based on bitmap graphics, not vectors. Resolution independence would be easier to pull off if Apple also announces an increased use of vectors to draw icons and interface elements. Think: Vectorized NIBs.
Read more…
Contributed by: Daniel Eran, RoughlyDrafted

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Stephen Colbert v. Wikipedia

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Date: Wednesday, August 2nd, 2006, 00:01
Category: Humor

Disclaimer: this post has nothing to do with the Mac or Apple, I just found it hilarious.
Stephen Colbert did a segment on his show last night about how easy it is to edit Wikipedia.
Watch:


Not being able to resist, I checked out the Wikipedia entries for The Colbert Report (currently protected from editing until disputes have been resolved) and Elephant (displaying a “stable” version).
Then I saw this post by the Tawker who is the person that blocked Colbert:

In all, we ended up protecting 20 elephant related pages (I’m not listing them all here, I only have so much disk space :) , my stats for the the anti vandalism bots show 250 or so elephant related pages reverts. Most were, you guessed it, the fact that the population tripled – way too many times (repetition my friend).

Gold, I tell you. That Wikipedia is Gold!

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PowerPage Bag Blowout 2006

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Date: Tuesday, August 1st, 2006, 09:00
Category: Luggage

wooden-powerbook-crate.jpgNo one likes the prospect of the end of summer and there’s just something about start of August that says “one last month” before the summer begins to fade and it’s time to get serious again.
One of my favorite things about the fall is, well, NFL football, But until kickoff on 07 September I live for the sound of Velcro being torn open and the smell of fresh Cordura Nylon in the air.
The start of August can only mean one thing – that it’s time for PowerPage Bag Blowout 2006.
Whether you’re a slick corporate raider, hipster student or just a stinky hippy in a van, we’ve got something for everyone this year. Although I really like the concept of Bag Week (think Shark…) one week isn’t enough time to cover all the great new luggage that’s available for notebook computer totage. So now that it’s August I’ll be peppering the site with fresh reviews of some crazy new bags from your favorite vendors.
(If there’s something special that shouldn’t be looked over during Bag Month, let me know and I’ll do everything I can to have it included.)
Me, I’m a simple dude. When at home I keep my pimped MacBook Pro in a wooden crate and when I’m on the road I kick it with a homemade MacBook Pro sleeve made out of foam core and duct tape. Cha!
So what do you, fair PowerPage reader, carry your precious cargo in? Chime in using the comments below. FWIW I’ve turned off all authentication (read: no registration) on comments, so have at it, but please behave!
(Foam core diddy courtesy of Lifehacker, wooden box contributed by Calvin Tomm.)

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Review: Nokia 770 Internet Tablet

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Date: Monday, July 31st, 2006, 10:48
Category: Gadget

nokia-770.jpgSummary: The Nokia 770 is the best bridge-device yet between mobility and the web2.0 world. It is a solid go-to device for messaging and presence, as well as having a very capable browser. It can appear a bit sluggish at times, but it is a very flexible device with a lot of untapped potential. Having said that, Nokia has been making steady improvements to the device in the form of software updates.
I am running the 2006 edition of the software. I am also only going to cover the things I actually use my 770 for, since it does a lot of things, but I think it may be interesting for people to know how I use the device.
The Nokia 770 is easy to like. It runs Linux and X11, has a slew of little applications and allows easy third-party access, and also speaks WiFi and Bluetooth allowing you to talk to the Internet with ease.
Physically the device feels great, it is a good weight and the build quality is nice. It feels substantial and not cheap. It really freaks me out when I’m using something that feels hollow and brittle. I really like holding and using the 770. There are some minor construction issues, namely that when you have the 770 in its metallic sleeve you can’t reach the stylus because its blocked by the lip of the jacket. I don’t know how something like that got through QA.
So it has a stylus and a touchscreen, and it does handwriting recognition but I haven’t used that yet. It doesn’t have a PIM and it doesn’t sync against anything. It isn’t a PDA but is more of a surfboard for IM, Presence, Browsing, and Email. It can also be transmogrified into a softphone via Gizmoproject or Google Talk.
When you first boot the device up and do some simple configuration you’ll be dumped out to a desktop of sorts, which is also activated by using the Home key on the device. You can run little widgets that do things like pull RSS feeds, access Internet radio, or give you easy access to your favorite search engine.
Read more (including about 17 screen shots)…

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My .Mac Experience: Intro

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Date: Monday, July 31st, 2006, 08:00
Category: Software

dotmac_box.jpgI just received my .Mac retail kit in the mail today. After doing some research into .Mac and reading some articles I thought that I would give it a try for one year to see what I think. As a part of my experience I am going to write some additional articles for the PowerPage.
I paid CAD$99 (US$87.25) for .Mac from Best Buy here in Canada. It retails for CAN$139 on Apple’s Canadian Store, CAN$119 at Amazon.ca, and US$79.99 (CAN$90.76) at Amazon.com (Canadians cannot buy items from Amazon.com, only Amazon.ca, which at this point is just a books-music-movies-software store). My first complaint (already?) is that .Mac is more expensive in Canada than it is in the US for essentially the same service. .Mac’s retail price in Canada is CAN$26 more than it is in the US. Should I end up having to pay the full CAN$139 to renew my .Mac membership next year, it will most certainly be a factor in my continued use of the service. Then again, I may be addicted by then. The Canadian price should be lowered to be comparable to the US price. I only bought .Mac at this time because it was on sale at Best Buy for $40 off the retail price.
I decided to try .Mac because I wanted remote access to “stuff” that I use on a regular basis. I liked the idea of a my address book online (read: still no cell phone), my 469 bookmarks online, a home page or web page, the iDisk, Backup, and some other items. I suppose there are other sites that provide these services for free but I wanted a full Apple-based kind of service. I like what Apple does with most things and I usually find the end-user experience quite satisfying. I am highly critical of end-user experiences in all things. I have had past experience with programming and systems analysis when I was in school, but I am still very much an “effective and efficient systems” connoisseur. It is just the way that my mind functions. I am naturally drawn to Apple because of the simplicity.
I will update my .Mac experience after one week and then every few months after that until my subscription comes up for renewal. Stay ituned.
Contributed by: SCULLEY

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The Xserve mini

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, July 26th, 2006, 09:00
Category: Opinion

XServemini.png

Two and a half years ago, I wrote an article presenting how Apple should move their Flat Panel iMac into the future: plop three inches of Mac on the back of a Cinema Display and call it the new iMac. I also presented why the alternatives made no sense. As it turned out, I was spot on.
Apple did exactly what I predicted: they dumped the igloo iMac and released a computer integrated into a slightly thicker version of their display as its successor. Since Ive, Jobs and company are all no doubt anxiously awaiting my next new idea for a new Mac product category, I’ll get right into presenting what it is, and why the world needs (drumroll please)… the Xserve mini.
Read more…
Contributed by: Daniel Eran, RoughlyDrafted

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Market Share Myth: Nailed!

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Date: Wednesday, July 26th, 2006, 09:00
Category: Opinion

In The Apple Market Share Myth, I demonstrated how overall market share numbers can be used to suggest ideas that have no basis in reality. Here, I’ll look at the slippery aspect of numbers, prove that a quality share of the market can be better than a larger market share, and then compare how the definition of a market is critically important in determining how useful market share numbers are. In particular, I’ll look at the iPod’s market share.
Read more…
Contributed by: Daniel Eran, RoughlyDrafted

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