Introducing Wireless Philadelphia

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Date: Thursday, September 21st, 2006, 08:00
Category: wireless

wireless-philly.jpgWireless Philadelphia is the non-profit organization that – along with its Internet partner Earthlink – is helping Philadelphia to become the nation’s first completely wireless major city.
Wireless Philadelphia was created to make high-speed Internet access more available and affordable through Digital Inclusion. WP will help all citizens, businesses, schools, and community organizations embrace this broadband technology to achieve their goals. WP will also work to strengthen the City’s economy, enhance the visitor experience and streamline City services.
What is Digital Inclusion?
Digital Inclusion is the name given to programs that seek to help people who are not online gain access with affordable hardware, software, tech support, and wireless high-speed internet service, so they can begin to use this technology to improve their lives.
Installation Has Begun
With the installation of devices called routers, Philadelphia has officially begun the process for making affordable wireless high-speed internet service available to every neighborhood in the City. Over the next two months, these routers – which use about the same amount of electricity as a 60 watt light bulb – will be installed on light poles and other high structures about 1,000 feet apart throughout a test area known as the Proof of Concept area.
The Proof of Concept area includes more than a dozen neighborhoods stretching 15 square miles (see map above). In this area from October through December, Earthlink and Wireless Philadelphia will test the technology and the processes by which citizens subscribe for this service. By fall of next year, wireless high-speed Internet access is scheduled to be available throughout all 135 square miles of Philadelphia.
This service will be priced beginning at $21.95/month for retail customers, and a Digital Inclusion rate of $9.95/month will be available to those who qualify. In order to be eligible for the Digital Inclusion rate, customers can have income up to 130% of the federal poverty level, or already be participants in certain supportive programs, such as Medicaid, Section 8, SSI, Food Stamps, LIHEAP, TANF, and/or the Free Lunch program.
Free access will be available in certain public spaces such as parks and public areas. These include Love Park, the Historic Square Mile, Penn’s Landing, Cobbs Creek Environmental Center, Hunting Park, Wissahickon Environmental Center, Pennypack Environmental Center, FDR Park and Penn Treaty Park. In addition, each district councilperson will name a public space within his/her district where citizens can go for free access.

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REVIEW: Motorola SLVR L7 Mobile Phone

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Date: Sunday, February 26th, 2006, 23:50
Category: Mobile Phone

motorola-SLVR-2.jpgI’ve had the opportunity to test drive the Motorola SLVR L7 the second phone to integrate iTunes into the mobile phone experience. The SLVR is a quad band (GSM 850/900/1800/1900 MHz) mobile phone with support for international roaming.
The SLVR includes built-in stereo speakers, integrated hands-free speakerphone, 262,000 “vivid color” display, illuminated etched keypad, VGA camera with 4x digital zoom, and video capture and playback. The SLVR L7 ships with extra ring-tones, Java support for games and applications, AOL/Yahoo!/ICQ instant messaging and Bluetooth connectivity.
The SLVR is the replacement for the Motorola ROKR, which I reviewed in January 2006. Although this is the second generation of the iTunes phone you can still find the ROKR for US$99. This makes sense in the big picture because this new Motorola phone is so different from the ROKR in terms of appearance and feel, even though the interface is almost identical.
Read more…

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REVIEW: Motorola ROKR E1 iTunes Mobile Phone

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Date: Friday, January 6th, 2006, 09:53
Category: Mobile Phone

Motorola ROKR iTunes PhoneThere was a point in time where I carried around three plus electronic devices at a time and loved it – and that was before the invention of the portable MP3 player. Sure, I could be described as a geek, but at times it was part of my job.
Like may people, I have greatly simplified what I like to carry around and an MP3 player has quickly zoomed to the top of that list. Carrying a mobile phone has become a necessity. Carrying around a Palm organizer/PDA has slipped down the list, but staying organized with my calendar and contacts is still a priority. Am I really supposed to carry around three devices in my bag? Arguably, I am a good candidate for one of these devices that combines phone, music, and organization, in that order.
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Missing Sync for Sidekick Updated for Tiger

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Date: Sunday, May 22nd, 2005, 23:19
Category: Software

Mark/Space, Inc. is pleased to announce The Missing Sync for Hiptop 1.0.1 beta 5. This version is being made available to registered users for testing various fixes. Please note that since this is a beta version, it has not been fully tested. We recommend you backup your data prior to installing. If you have issues with this version, you may have to revert to the shipping version.
The beta version can be downloaded from our testing page.

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Microsoft Teaches 133t5p33k

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Date: Tuesday, May 17th, 2005, 14:37
Category: Archive

Microsoft: “While it’s important to respect your children’s privacy, understanding what your teenager’s online slang means and how to decipher could be important in certain situations and as you help guide their online experience. While it has many nicknames, information-age slang is commonly referred to as leetspeek, or leet for short. Leet (a vernacular form of “elite”) is a specific type of computer slang where a user replaces regular letters with other keyboard characters to form words phonetically?creating the digital equivalent of Pig Latin with a twist of hieroglyphics.”
Related Microsoft Links:
- Teen online lingo
- Online gaming lingo
- Netiquette 101

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Register: US Leads World in SPAM

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Date: Monday, April 11th, 2005, 11:10
Category: Archive

According to a story on The Register, the US is the source for more than 35% of all spam, world-wide, with South Korea second at 25%, and China third at just under 10% (all this according to Sophos).
Here’s the interesting quote in the article:

Sophos researchers say that an unprotected Windows XP computer (without any firewall, patches or anti-virus protection) stands a 50 per cent chance of infection by an internet worm after just nine minutes plugged onto the net. After 40 minutes there is a 90 per cent chance of infection.

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WMC: Moby Q&A Session at the Wyndham 'Hotel'

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Date: Thursday, March 31st, 2005, 11:28
Category: DJ

WMC: Exclusive session with MobyToday we’re cross-posting some content from our good friend Peter Kirn’s CreateDigitalMusic.com.
In support of his new CD, “Hotel”, Moby gave an exclusive Q and A session for Winter Music Conference attendees. From his new album and musical tour, to his appearance on NBC’s The Apprentice, Moby has been all over the place and in the musical limelight. Read More…

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MacOSX.com Launches Free Tech Support Service

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Date: Monday, February 28th, 2005, 02:10
Category: Archive

MacOSX.com announces free personal technical support services. The new free service feature is email based and provides individual attention by a Macintosh tech. Responses to issues are generally provided in less than 24 hours. Read More…

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iChatAV and MSN Messenger Reviewed in NY Times

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Date: Friday, June 27th, 2003, 01:44
Category: Software

David Pogue reviews the latest chat offerings from Apple and Microsoft in an article (free registration req’d) in the NYTimes:
Even in their preliminary incarnations, these programs illustrate two important points. First, the addition of voice and video changes the experience so profoundly, it’s not really chat any more. Second, Apple and Microsoft may as well have come from different planets.
For example, Microsoft, true to tradition, has focused on expanding its list of features, while Apple has worked toward elegance and simplicity. Messenger is a cacophony of brightly colored buttons, panels, blinking advertisements and, in the new version, animated (and even homemade) smileys; iChat AV maintains the clean lines and brushed-metal “surfaces” of its text-only predecessors. The new features of Messenger 6 include custom window backgrounds and interactive games like checkers; iChat AV is dedicated solely to communication. Messenger 6, in its ultimate form, will be free; iChat AV will cost $30 (but will be free with Apple’s next operating-system release, Mac OS X 10.3, code-named Panther, due by year’s end).

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