Cell Phone Service Disabled In N.Y. Tunnels After London Attack

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, July 14th, 2005, 10:24
Category: Archive

ComputerWorld: Cellular phone service has been shut off in four busy New York commuter tunnels in the wake of the bombings of London’s transportation system.

(more…)

New '.mobi' Domain for Wireless Web Sites

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, July 14th, 2005, 10:34
Category: Archive

ComputerWorld: The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers today approved the “.mobi” suffix for Web sites designed to be accessed by mobile phones.
Does anyone think that the new .mobi Top Level Domain will take off given the slow adoption of WAP and WML? Is there any question whether it will be more popular than the new .xxx TLD?

(more…)

Apple's Sales, Profit Surge

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, July 14th, 2005, 10:53
Category: Archive

Sales jumped 75%, thanks to iPod, but the company was not upbeat about this quarter. Read More…

(more…)

Google Earth – Going Where no Mac has Ever Gone Before

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, July 12th, 2005, 00:00
Category: Archive

Google Earth is the same software that was available as Keyhole when Google bought them last year. It allows you to take a magic carpet ride starting from outer space into anywhere on earth flying through satellite images with superimposed map info. It allows you to tilt the view so it really gives the sensation of superman-ing it through your ‘burb.
See what Walt Mossberg from WSJ had to say (also a big Treo 650 fan) in Google Earth Thrills With Photos and Stunts – But How Practical Is It?

It’s good to have a healthy skepticism about the claims of the hype-driven technology industry. But there are times when even a hardened skeptic has to admit to amazement and delight at the sheer coolness of some of the things you can do on a personal computer today. And one of those “wow” moments happens the first time you run a new program called Google Earth.

Too bad it’s Windows-only, right now. According to the Google Earth download page “Apple Macintosh computers are not supported at this time (but we are working on it).”

(more…)

"Placeshifting" Content to Suit Your Needs

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, July 12th, 2005, 00:07
Category: Archive

Sling Media’s Slingbox is a US$249.99 device lets you watch cable, satellite, or personal video recorder (PVR) programming from wherever you are by turning any Internet-connected desktop or laptop computer into a personal TV, according to the company. Slingbox only works with Windows XP but a Mac version is rumored to be in development.

The Slingbox redirects, or “placeshifts,” a single live TV stream from a cable box, satellite receiver, or PVR to the viewer?s computer, which can be located anywhere in the home. If the Slingbox is coupled with a broadband Internet connection, the viewer?s live TV stream can purportedly be “placeshifted” via the Internet to a computer located anywhere in the world.

Read More at Macsimum News.

(more…)

PowerBooks and iBooks in Iraq

Posted by:
Date: Monday, July 11th, 2005, 19:40
Category: Archive

PowerBooks in IraqIn Back from the Sand: A Mac in Iraq Lawrence I. Charters talks about PowerBooks in Iraq:

In early May a friend in the Pentagon sent me a photo of a Mac sitting on the hood of a Humvee, with a comment that ?Marines use only the best.? A few days later an Apple employee sent me another copy of this picture, plus a second, with a short note that said the photos were taken in Iraq.
I now had a mystery: where did these photos come from? Using clues found in the images as a guide, the photos were eventually traced back to Andrew Cutraro, a photographer with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Along with Post-Dispatch reporter Ron Harris, Cutraro was sent to cover the war in Iraq. ?Embedded,? as the Pentagon phrased it, with Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (part of the First Marine Division), Harris and Cutraro crossed into Iraq from Kuwait, and chronicled the war all the way into Baghdad. Their stories and photos appeared in both the paper and on the paper?s Web site, St. Louis Today.

A related article Evaluating an iBook Under Field Conditions Steven Truax relays his experiences of bringing a brand new iBook to Qatar for a month when he was was activated and deployed in the war on terrorism.

Three days and 7400 nautical miles later I unpacked my footlocker. In my first free moments I began to listen to the music that I had loaded onto iTunes before I had left. The built-in speakers were small and weak, which was not too surprising considering the size limitations of the iBook. These would never do by themselves, but I had brought headphones and under stereo headphones the MP3 music was outstanding. I soon began to make regular trips to our tiny Base Exchange store (BX) to look for more music. After a few weeks I was surprised to realize that I had bought and encoded forty CD?s of music. At first I bought some old CD?s that I had meant to buy for some time but had not gotten around to. After that I bought several contemporary CD?s, ranging from Counting Crows to Garth Brooks, that I would not have gotten around to buying if I had stayed home. Now, I thought with some satisfaction, my wife can no longer tell me that I have never owned a vehicle or CD that had been produced in the current decade. My new iBook and I were off to the races. Let the thunder roll…

(more…)

IBM PowerPC 970 Goes Dual-Core and Low-Power

Posted by:
Date: Monday, July 11th, 2005, 08:22
Category: Archive

IBMIBM announced two new PowerPC chips designed for entry-level servers and PCs at a company event in Tokyo on Thursday.The ironic part is that the the 970FX would have been perfect for the PowerBook G5. According to CNet:

The PowerPC 970MP is a dual-core version of the PowerPC 970FX, which is commonly found in Macintosh computers running G5 processors. IBM also said it will release a low-power version of the PowerPC 970FX.
What’s novel about the PowerPC 970MP’s design is that each of the two 64-bit cores has its own dedicated 1MB of level-two cache memory. That means that either side of the chip can be powered down to a state IBM calls “doze” while the other core continues to work. The technique helps save power and extends the life of the computer, IBM said.

AppleInsider goes into more detail:

Two variants of the chip — a 1.2GHz version and a 1.4GHz version — consume an approximately 13 watts of power, believed to be cool enough to operate inside a PowerBook enclosure with an advanced cooling system. A high-end 1.6GHz version consumes 16 watts.
By comparison, Freescale’s recently introduced MPC7448 PowerPC G4, the successor to the chip used in Apple’s current PowerBook G4 systems, will consume about 10 watts of power running at 1.4GHz, and just under 15 watts of power at its top speed of 1.7GHz.

(more…)

Boycott TicketMaster

Posted by:
Date: Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 13:43
Category: Archive

TicketMaster TicketBastardI just got shut out of buying tickets for the Pearl Jam concerts in Atlantic City today, despite having a live operator on the phone at 10:01 a.m. – literally the minute tickets went on sale. It’s a long story but suffice it to say that the operator could not successfully place my order in time, despite having “found tickets.” Anyway, this isn’t the first time that I have received abysmal service from the ticket monopolist and I’m calling for a boycott of TicketMaster and an investigation into their monopolistic business practices. Following is part of the letter that I sent to TicketMaster today….

(more…)

Grand Rapids, MI Apple Store Opening, Mid-town NYC Store Staffing

Posted by:
Date: Friday, July 8th, 2005, 08:59
Category: Archive

Apple Store Opening Grand Rapids, MIJim Nichols sends us some pictures of the Grand Rapids, MI Apple Store grand opening. “There was a huge turnout – as there usually are at Apple store openings. I estimate that they had to be close to 1000 or more in line by 10:00a.m.”
In related news: It looks like the Apple Store Midtown NYC is staffing up.

(more…)

Caveat Emptor When Buying a Notebook Computer

Posted by:
Date: Friday, July 8th, 2005, 05:54
Category: Archive

An article by Rob Pegoraro for The Washington Post, Buyer be wise when looking for a laptop, discusses the practice of some Windows notebook vendors shipping a “starter” battery with their laptops and the tactic of low-balling laptop weights.

The biggest area of compromise is the battery. It’s bad enough that many laptop vendors act as if battery life is either a state secret or a mystery; there is no EPA estimate or Energy Star certification for this sort of thing.
But several of these companies seem to have also adopted one of the worst habits of the digital-camera business.
Just as some digicam manufacturers bundle “starter” memory cards that accommodate only a handful of photos, some laptop makers ? including Dell, Gateway and Hewlett-Packard ? ship computers with batteries that will expire before you can finish watching a movie.
If you want a longer run time, you’ll have to upgrade to a heavier, sometimes larger replacement battery. If you don’t think to do this as you order the machine online, you wind up paying for two batteries, one of which will be doomed to collect dust in a closet.

(more…)