Will Apple sue the WSJ and c|net?

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, June 8th, 2005, 08:34
Category: Opinion

TUAW: Dan Gillmor has been asking an interesting question: will apple sue the Wall Street Journal over the Intel leak the way they sued the bloggers in Apple v. Does? The WSJ doesn’t seem to think so; they’re patting themselves on the back over Jobs’ reference to them as the end of his keynote. Gillmor doesn’t seem to think so, either, and neither do I. Letting the WSJ off the hook is a way to reinforce the legitimacy of “old media” reporting over “new media” blogging. This is also probably the reason he singled out the WSJ in his talk, even though c|net also broke the story. For a company that wants to be your internet and digital hub, Apple can be pretty hidebound.
Dan Gilmore: By the way, I suspect that Jobs deliberately cited the Journal, not the online news organization. His company is at war with online publications about revealing “trade secrets” — essentially anything Apple wants journalists not to report about. To give a credible news organization like CNet credit might undermine his attacks on Web journalism as a genre.

(more…)

Steve Jobs is Crazy

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, June 7th, 2005, 07:12
Category: Opinion

Crazy like a fox, and the fox is in the proverbial henhouse. If you take the latest Intel announcement at face value, the roadmap for Intel chips is better suited to Apple future products. Well, what are those products? Apple does not like to talk about future products, but we sure do. Read on…

(more…)

Apple Joins the Navy

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, May 26th, 2005, 09:41
Category: Opinion

Apple’s corporate doublespeak completely blows me away. Example: CEO Steve Jobs said he plans to continue his litigation of the independent online media (including this site) all the way to the Supreme Court… “No one has the right to publish confidential information just because they can.” (Searchblog)
But when questioned about his decision to pull Wiley books from the bookshelves in Apple Stores after the company published iCon Steve Jobs: The Greatest Second Act in the History of Business (US$16.47 at Amazon.com), he commented “I didn’t want to do business with them,” but added: “People can publish whatever they want to publish.” (Macworld UK)
Huh? I wish Apple would spend more money on fixing things like the battery recalls, crappy hinges software QA issues and on increasing market share – instead of lawyers.

(more…)

Google Redraws World According to George Bush

Posted by:
Date: Sunday, May 1st, 2005, 21:23
Category: Opinion

An article on The Register by Lester Haines trots out an interesting conspiracy theory about Google Maps and how George Bush has final approval on countries represented in the UK version.

That’s right. In Google’s Brave New World, potential threats to US national security have been neutralized by airbrushing them from the surface of the globe. Naturally, the UK survives the apocalypse by virtue of its “special relationship” with the US.

(more…)

Is it just Ego? (Updated)

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, April 27th, 2005, 08:36
Category: Opinion

iCon Steve Jobs: The Greatest Second Act in the History of BusinessApple has pulled all John Wiley & Sons books from its stores because they are publishing an unauthorized biography of Steve Jobs. (iCon Steve Jobs: The Greatest Second Act in the History of Business, US$16.47 at Amazon.com). Was this meant to pressure the publisher into quashing the biography or is it just punishment? Apple seeks to get online journalists to disclose sources to plug internal leaks.
Was this meant to intimidate the online journalists or was it just an attempt to antagonize the mainstream press by threatening first amendment protections? Apple pursues students who post builds of Tiger to the point of bankrupting their families before settling and extracting an apology. Was ATI punished harshly for its mistake in releasing information about Steve Jobs keynote announcement back in 2000?
What in the world happened to the summer version of Macworld and could it have been handled any worse? Why can’t Disney and Pixar come to terms? Is the Jackling Estate in Woodside, California an “abomination” or a treasure? How angry did environmental protesters in foam iPod costumes make Steve at the annual meeting this month? Did Steve Jobs slap a soldier who was suffering from post traumatic stress? No, that was Lt. General George S. Patton, Jr. and he slapped two of them. Just Google “Steve Jobs angered” to get your answer to the question: is it just ego?
Read More:
- Steve Jobs continues assault on First Amendment (Ed Bott)
- Caution: Steve is Watching (ATAT)

(more…)

Think Belligerent (Updated)

Posted by:
Date: Sunday, April 24th, 2005, 22:51
Category: Opinion

Think BelligerentA Wired article by Tom McNichol in the May 2005 issue talks about the New Apple ™ and the company’s plan to subvert free speech.

Steve Jobs will do anything to protect his precious secrets. So he’s suing Apple’s biggest fans. Inside the Mac daddy’s battle with the rumor blogs.
Nick Ciarelli is the kind of guy Apple is supposed to love. At age 6 he bagan using his parents’ Mac Classic and quickly became a zealot. At age 13 he launched a Web site devote to all things Apple, especially upcoming product releases, Now 19, Ciarelli has turned his site, Think Secret, into a must read for true Apple fans.
So why is the company trying to squash him?

Check it out in the May 2005 issue of Wired. It’s the one with Darth Vader on the the cover.
Update:
Wired has posted the full text of the article here.

(more…)

L.A. Times: Apple "Chilly and Arrogant as an oil Company"

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 09:23
Category: Opinion

The L.A. Times has a story this morning on Apple’s attempts at an end-around the constitution in issuing a subpoena to my former ISP in an attempt to read my email.

For all its skill at designing products that strike an emotional chord with consumers, Apple Computer Inc. sometimes projects a corporate personality as chilly and arrogant as an oil company.
The latest manifestation of this trait is an Apple lawsuit implicitly aimed at a couple of online publications, Apple Insider and PowerPage, that compile tips, rumors and speculation about the company as sedulously as People counts celebrity stretch marks. The lawsuit concerns their premature publication of details of an unannounced Apple product dubbed Asteroid, which will enable users to record musical instruments directly onto their computers.

If Apple spent as much effort on Quality Assurance (witness the 10.3.9 Java fiasco, and the waning PowerBook quality) as it does to litigate its biggest fans and supporters, they’d undoubtedly have better products and more sales. Shame on Apple.

(more…)

Apple Legal Wranglings

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, March 23rd, 2005, 07:33
Category: Opinion

Some folks are thinking a bit too simplistically about the current Apple legal wranglings. Computer users are not going to be changing their operating system based on perceptions about fairness or who is the underdog. The big issue here is that Apple is damaging its relationship with the mainstream press and over what? To put the news agencies First Amendment protections at risk over controlling some piddling leaks, leaks that have only served to boost the Apple hype makes no sense whatsoever. This smells like a personality disorder and not a business decision. Apple is flying high. Apple stock has split, iPod sales are through the roof and the most important development of all, Apple’s share of the personal computer market is surging after hanging on by a thread for so long. This is all great news, but the press loves to see a reversal of fortune. The fallout over these legal wranglings could cost Apple and the Apple brand dearly. An Apple micro notepad computer, set-top entertainment system, breakout into video distribution – who knows what – is not without risk. Good press and lots of press is important if Apple is to launch the next big thing. Sure it would be a shame if that next big thing were announced by some kid from Harvard and not at a whiz bang press extravaganza, but it would be much worse if the bad blood this engenders with the news outlets puts a seriously negative spin on the next slip up that Apple will inevitably make.

(more…)

Blogshine Sunday and Public Access to Gov't Information

Posted by:
Date: Monday, March 14th, 2005, 00:15
Category: Opinion

On Sunday, March 13, bloggers around the world blogged about the need for access to government information. Read More…

(more…)

CNet: Apple lawsuit: Thinking different?

Posted by:
Date: Friday, March 11th, 2005, 21:45
Category: Opinion

An opinion piece by Charles Cooper for CNet also discusses Apple’s trampling of the First Amendment:

The real subtext is this: Apple is directed by a collection of control freaks who would have found themselves quite at home in the Nixon White House. The big difference being that reporters had the constitutional freedom to report on the Nixon White House.
Apple has been an infuriating company for me to cover over the last two decades or so. I adore its technology but can’t stomach its overreaching sense of entitlement. Other tech companies deal with leaks all the time. Nobody’s happy when their discussions wind up as fodder for the rumor mill. But that’s part of the give-and-take that’s defined the technology business for decades.

(more…)