iOS 11 feature could allow iPhone Touch ID feature to be disabled, thereby adding additional layer of privacy via “cop button”

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Date: Monday, August 21st, 2017, 05:30
Category: iOS, iPhone, Legal, News, privacy, Software, Touch ID

Over the years, Apple’s Touch ID technology has proven to be a legal gray area whenever law enforcement or border patrol asked you to hand over your iPhone.

A new feature may have surfaced in a beta of iOS 11 that essentially functions as a “cop button”, wherein the iPhone owner can set up a provision in the update allowing you to choose whether to keep TouchID on or not. Instead of relying on Touch ID, users could incorporate a long, complex password, thus locking out cops and anyone who doesn’t know the passphrase.

Currently, police can force you to use your fingerprint to unlock the phone, but they can’t force you to use your password — something that has been proven by law to be protected.

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Feinstein: FBI spent roughly $900,000 to decrypt San Bernadino shooter’s iPhone 5c data

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Date: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017, 05:06
Category: iOS, iPhone, Legal, News, privacy, security, Software, Uncategorized

The data recovery effort to copy the iPhone 5c data of San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook erred on the pricey side.

Namely, in the neighborhood of $900,000 according to California senator Dianne Feinstein, who mentioned the amount spent recently when questioning FBI director James Comey at a Senate Judiciary Committee oversight hearing.

“I was so struck when San Bernardino happened and you made overtures to allow that device to be opened, and then the FBI had to spend $900,000 to hack it open,” Feinstein commented. “And as I subsequently learned of some of the reason for it, there were good reasons to get into that device.”

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FBI director James Comey’s testimony states that agency has been unable to access less than half of mobile devices this fiscal year

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Date: Friday, May 5th, 2017, 05:51
Category: iPhone, News, privacy, security, Software

Per FBI director James Comey’s testimony to a Senate oversight committee, the Bureau has been unable to access almost half of the mobile devices it tried to examine in the first half of the fiscal year.

Comey said the FBI had been unable to access the contents of more than 3,000 mobile devices in the first half of the fiscal year, using what he described as “appropriate and available technical tools, even though there was the legal authority to do so.” He said that represented “nearly half” of all the mobile devices it had attempted to access in that time frame.

Comey’s statements seem to be leading towards support of forcing phone manufacturers to provide backdoor access to the authorities.

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Congress moves forward with anti-Internet-privacy bill

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Date: Monday, March 27th, 2017, 05:37
Category: Legal, News, privacy

Make of this what you will.

The United States Senate The US Senate has voted to overturn Internet privacy rules introduced last year by the FCC. In addition, the overturned vote works to prevent the FCC from passing any further such rules in the future.

Via the notes:

Congress disapproves the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission relating to “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” (81 Fed. Reg. 87274 (December 2, 2016)), and such rule shall have no force or effect.

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WikiLeaks to share CIA hacking tools with Apple, other firms after security fixes are complete

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Date: Friday, March 10th, 2017, 05:36
Category: Hack, iOS, News, privacy, security, Software

Following WikiLeaks’ release of more than 8,000 documents from inside the CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence, Apple followed up, saying it had already fixed most of the exploits the agency had found to hack into iPhones.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Thursday he will share the code, which was withheld from the published documents, with tech companies like Apple.

Per Assange:

“We have decided to work with [tech companies] to give them exclusive access to the additional technological details we have so that fixes can be developed and pushed out,” Assange said in a live-streamed press conference from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he lives. “Once this material is effectively disarmed by us we will publish additional details.”

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Apple responds to WikiLeaks’ release of CIA-based documents, states that ‘many’ of the iOS-related exploits have already been patched

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Date: Wednesday, March 8th, 2017, 05:47
Category: Hack, iOS, News, privacy, security, Software

With any luck, this’ll provide some consolation.

Following up on the revelation that WikiLeaks had intercepted and released what might amount to 8,700+ documents from the CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence unit – part of which is devoted to obtaining zero-day exploits for iOS devices – and that the CIA had lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal, Apple went on record to state that “many of the issues leaked today were already patched” in the most recent version of iOS.

The company offered the following comment:

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WikiLeaks releases 8,700+ CIA-related documents, show agency efforts towards hacking Android systems, iPhones, operating systems and smart TVs

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Date: Wednesday, March 8th, 2017, 05:43
Category: Android, Google, Hack, Hardware, iOS, iPhone, macOS, News, privacy, Samsung, security

This is pretty much one for the ages.

WikiLeaks has released more than 8,700 documents that have apparently originated from the CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence, with some of the leaks saying the agency had 24 “weaponized” and previously undisclosed exploits for the Android operating system as of 2016.

Some of the Android-specific exploits were developed by the CIA, while others hailed from the U.S. National Security Agency, U.K. intelligence agency GCHQ, and cyber arms dealers.

Among the smartphone-related tools developed by the CIA were assets that allow the agency to bypass encryption found in WhatsApp, Confide and other applications known to use encryption. These tools, according to WikiLeaks analysis, capture audio and message traffic before encryption has a chance to be applied.

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Meitu selfie app apparently collecting, transmitting user data back to Chinese source

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Date: Monday, January 23rd, 2017, 05:11
Category: Android, iOS, iPhone, News, privacy, security, Software

The good news is that the Meitu app adds some cool selfie editing tools, allowing you to pretty much transform your selfie pictures into nifty anime characters.

The bad news is that the app is apparently sending back as much private information as it can to a Chinese source.

The MeituPic app, launched in 2013, soared to the top of the Chinese app charts. It was rebranded as “Meitu” in 2016 and works by taking a selfie, smoothing a person’s skin, adding virtual makeup and a number of other effects.

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iPhones secretly storing call data in iCloud, allows later access for law enforcement (Updated)

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Date: Friday, November 18th, 2016, 05:43
Category: iOS, iPhone, privacy, security, Software

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This definitely qualifies as a mess between privacy, security and law enforcement.

While Apple emerged as a guardian of privacy earlier this year, fighting the FBI’s demands to help crack San Bernadino shooter Syed Farouk’s iPhone, implementing improved encryption for all its handsets and refusing to undermine that encryption, it appears that private data is being sent to the iCloud without user consent.

Russian digital forensics firm Elcomsoft has found that Apple’s mobile devices automatically send a user’s call history to the company’s servers if iCloud is enabled — but the data gets uploaded in many instances without user choice or notification.

“You only need to have iCloud itself enabled” for the data to be sent, said Vladimir Katalov, CEO of Elcomsoft.

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Leaked document explains how Apple tracks communication via, shares information with law enforcement

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Date: Thursday, September 29th, 2016, 05:01
Category: iOS, iPhone, Legal, News, privacy, security

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In the complicated balancing act between privacy and security, it looks like Apple has been handing the phone number you’ve called over to the police.

Following this year’s FBI investigation and Apple’s vows of privacy protection, it appears that Apple in fact keeps a log of everyone you try to contact using iMessage, according to a leaked document found by The Intercept. These logs contain personal contact information, including phone numbers, and are stored in Apple’s servers for 30 days before being deleted. Furthermore, Apple has shared these server logs with police after being compelled by a court order.

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