iPhone 3GS Hardware Encryption Cracked in Two Minutes

Posted by:
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2009, 05:35
Category: iPhone 3GS, security

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As cool as the recently-released iPhone 3GS may be, there may be room for improvement. According to a blog entry over on Wired’s Gadget Lab, iPhone Forensics expert Jonathan Zdziarski describes how the hardware encryption of the iPhone 3Gs can be worked around and demonstrates how both the passcode and backup encryption can be bypassed in about two minutes.

Zdziarski goes on to comment that all data on the iPhone, including deleted data, is automatically decrypted by the iPhone when it’s copied, allowing users and law enforcement agencies alike access the device’s raw disk as if no encryption were present. A second demonstration features the recovery of the iPhone’s entire disk while the device is still passcode-locked.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’ve heard anything about this, let us know in the comments.

Apple Releases Security Update 2009-002 for Mac OS X 10.4.X Users

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, May 13th, 2009, 09:34
Category: security, Software

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If you’re still running Mac OS X 10.4.x (“Tiger”), there’s no reason you shouldn’t feel as secure as a user running Mac OS X 10.5.7 with all its inherent updates. According to MacNN, Apple released Security Update 2009-002 for the previous operating system.
The update patches several areas of Tiger, including Apache, CoreGraphics, CUPS, Disk images, Flash Player plug-in, Help Viewer, Spotlight, X11, and more and fixes problems ranging from keeping PDFs opened in CoreGraphics from executing malicious code to preventing maliciously crafted Mach-O executables from causing the Finder to repeatedly terminate and relaunch.
There are four variants of the update (one each for Mac OS X 10.4.x on PowerPC and Intel-based hardware as well as two server versions) that can be located and installed via Mac OS X’s built-in Software Update feature.

TomTom Looking for Developers to Help Create iPhone Application

Posted by:
Date: Monday, May 11th, 2009, 08:46
Category: iPhone, security

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Navigation and not-getting-as-lost outfit TomTom is apparently stepping up its efforts to create a turn-by-turn application for the iPhone.
Per Electronista, a jobserve.us job listing doesn’t mention the company but asks for someone to develop navigation software in Amsterdam, the location of TomTom’s headquarters. The ideal candidate would start in May or June and work on developing the application for at least six months.
TomTom was one of the earliest GPS device makers to express an interest in iPhone applications, confirming its attempts a month ahead of the App Store’s launch last July.

Mac Hacker Charlie Miller Locations Additional Security Hole in iPhone

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Date: Friday, April 17th, 2009, 07:33
Category: iPod, security

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Mac hacker Charlie Miller, a principal security analyst at Independent Security Evaluators and the winner of the the CanSecWest security conference hacking contest two years straight, has detailed his latest find wherein he was able to run shellcode on an iPhone.
According to Macworld UK, it was widely believed by many security researchers that it wasn’t possible to run shellcode on an iPhone. Shellcode is code that can run from a command line, but the iPhone was thought not to allow it for security reasons.
If pulled off correctly, shellcode allows users to perform malicious actions such as gaining access to a users text messages or call history from a remote location.
Earlier versions of the iPhone OS firmware didn’t have many protections to prevent people from tampering with its memory to run other commands, Miller said. But the latest version of the iPhone’s software strengthened the overall security of the phone, Miller said.
In his report, Miller detailed how he was able to trick the iPhone into running code which then enabled shellcode. To pull this off, Miller said he needed to have a working exploit for an iPhone and a means of targeting a vulnerability in the software such as the Safari web browser or the iPhone’s operating system.
Miller said he doesn’t have one now but stated that if someone did, “this would allow you to run whatever code you want,” Miller said in an interview after his presentation.
In 2007 Miller and some of his colleagues did find a vulnerability in mobile Safari that would allow an attacker to control the iPhone. Apple was immediately notified and later issued a patch for the problem.
Miller said he isn’t sure if Apple is aware of the latest issue and stopped short of calling the problem a vulnerability, saying instead that Apple engineers may have overlooked the issue. Apple also has never come out publicly and said it is impossible to run shellcode on an iPhone, he said.

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