Rumor: Apple to release iOS 7.0.3 update, tackle assorted bugs, next week

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Date: Tuesday, October 1st, 2013, 13:05
Category: iOS, iPhone, Rumor, Software

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To quote the classic “Aliens”: “Is this going to be a stand up fight, sir, or just another bug hunt?”

Per Boy Genius Report, Apple is rumored to roll out another minor update to iOS 7 next week, addressing several small and lingering issues in the company’s latest mobile operating system.

The iOS 7.0.3 update has been released to employees and select external partners for testing according to the article. The new version is said to be made available in advance of iOS 7.1′s expected reveal alongside new iPads at Apple’s rumored October event.

The new build may address performance issues that have lingered since iOS 7′s debut last month as well as new lock screen bypass security concerns that have surfaced since last week’s iOS 7.0.2 release. For comparison, iOS 7.0.2 carries build number 11A501.

The same site incorrectly claimed that Apple would release a seventh beta of iOS 7 in August. Apple instead skipped from iOS beta 6 to iOS 7 Golden Master on Sept. 10.

Apple released iOS 7.0.1 with “bug fixes and improvements” as an over-the-air update for the iPhone 5s and 5c on the handsets’ launch day, with iOS 7.0.2 following just six days later to address bugs related to lockscreen passcode security.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Rumor: Leaked promotional art points to iPhone 5s, 5c en route to Boost Mobile network

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Date: Tuesday, October 1st, 2013, 06:16
Category: iPhone, retail, Rumor

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It’s a rumor but it’s interesting.

And it’s got some leaked art behind it.

Per Electronista and a Twitter leak, Boost Mobile is preparing to launch the iPhone 5s and 5c on its network, leaked promotional art indicates. The art doesn’t suggest when Boost will start selling the phones, but that could happen in the near future, given a series of rollouts at US carriers beginning October 1st. Prices are also missing from the advertising.


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If the leak is accurate, the 5s and 5c will be the very first iPhones on Boost, even though the carrier is owned by Sprint. Sprint-branded iPhones have been available since 2011, including through the US branch of Virgin Mobile, which Sprint controls. A number of rival prepaid carriers have also been selling the iPhone for some time, such as Cricket and Straight Talk.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

FAA committee recommends easing of electronic device restrictions during takeoff and landing – provided they’re in airplane mode

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Date: Friday, September 27th, 2013, 06:06
Category: iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, News

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This could be the first step on the road that allows you to use more electronic devices on an airplane during takeoff.

Per 9to5Mac and the Associated Press, a committee created by the Federal Aviation Administration recommended earlier today that airline passengers be allowed to use specific types of consumer electronics during takeoff and landing. Under the panel’s advice, usage of devices like iPhones, iPods, and iPads would be allowed as long as those devices are switched to airplane mode, which disables internet and cellular connections to prevent calls and data transfers.

This doesn’t necessarily mean you can hop onto a plane and begin using these devices anytime soon, but the recommendations have been passed to top FAA brass, who will now decide whether or not to implement the panel’s well-researched findings. As is usually the case with government, the process of approving and implementing these changes will likely take time. At the earliest these new policies could take effect next year, although it’s quite possible it may take much longer than that.

Still, this is a step in the right direction for consumers who just want to listen to a few songs, get a quick work idea jotted down or get started on an ebook during takeoff before a long flight.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases iOS 7.0.2 update, fixes Lock Screen vulnerability

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Date: Thursday, September 26th, 2013, 12:43
Category: iOS, iPad, iPad mini, iPhone, iPod Touch, News, security, Software

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It got some negative attention and now it’s got a fix.

On Thursday, Apple released iOS 7.0.2, an updated new version of its operating system for its iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices. The new operating system, which weighs in as a several hundred megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:
- Fixes bugs that could allow someone to bypass the Lock screen passcode.

- Reintroduces a Greek keyboard option for passcode entry.

iOS 7.0.2 is available via iTunes or Over-The-Air updating and requires an iPhone 4, 4S, 5, iPad 2, third or fourth-gen iPad, iPod Touch 4th Gen or iPad Mini to install and run.

If you’ve tried the updates and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

iPhone 5s, 5c to come to additional U.S. regional carriers on October 1st

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Date: Thursday, September 26th, 2013, 07:04
Category: iPhone, News, retail

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The iPhone’s regional support and overall availability in the U.S. is about to become a bit more robust.

Per AppleInsider, Apple’s new flagship iPhone 5s and mid-range iPhone 5c will become available on eight regional wireless carriers in U.S. beginning Oct. 1, including C Spire, Cellcom, and Bluegrass.

The new iPhones may get slightly easier to find as they make their way to regional wireless carriers next month. Apple moved more than nine million iPhone 5s and 5c units in their first weekend of availability, and larger national carriers AT&T, Verizon Wireless, and Sprint quickly sold out of their supply.

Carriers launching Apple’s new phones on Oct. 1 include:

- Cellcom – Michigan and Wisconsin

- C Spire Wireless – Mississippi, Tennessee, Florida, Alabama, Georgia

- Nex-Tech Wireless – Kansas and Colorado

- MTA – Alaska

- GCI – Alaska

- Bluegrass Cellular – Kentucky

- Appalachian Wireless – Kentucky and Virginia

- Ntelos – Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Kentucky, North Carolina

Some of the smaller carriers have chosen to offer the devices at a discount — for instance, consumers can get an on-contract iPhone 5s from Ntelos for US$149.99, a US$50 discount from the the phone’s normal price.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

AppleCare+ policies to change, will allow for hardware repairs in any country where AppleCare+ is offered

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, September 25th, 2013, 07:48
Category: Apple TV, AppleCare, iPad, iPhone, iPod, News

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If you travel with an AppleCare-covered device, you might like this.

Per AppleInsider and TechCrunch, it was revealed on Tuesday that Apple has changed the terms and conditions tied to AppleCare+ and will be lifting geographic limitations on support, meaning travelers can get their device serviced outside of their home country.

As noted, the recent policy change allows owners to take in products for repair in any country where AppleCare+ is offered, lifting previous restrictions that limited service to the country in which the plan was purchased. Devices include the iPhone, iPad, iPod, Apple TV, Apple displays and Mac models.

It should be noted that replacements and repairs may not be offered in all countries. The publication offers the CDMA version of the iPhone 5 as an example, pointing out the handset can’t be serviced or replaced in countries where it is not sold, like Brazil.

The changes are likely part of Apple’s continued effort to overhaul its post-sales service. When the iPhone 5s and 5c were unveiled on Sept. 10, it was announced that the AppleCare+ for iPhone per-incident deductible would be raised to US$79, up from US$49 previously.

Currently, AppleCare+ for iPhone, iPad and iPod is offered in Austria, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, the UK and the US.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

iSuppli runs numbers, finds $199, $183 build costs for iPhone 5s, 5c handsets

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Date: Wednesday, September 25th, 2013, 07:47
Category: Hardware, iPhone, News

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If you’re wondering how much Apple’s new iPhone handsets cost to manufacture, they’ve got a number.

Per AllThingsD, a forthcoming IHS iSuppli report posits that Apple spends at least US$191 on components to build a 16GB model of the iPhone 5s and between US$167 and US$176 for a low-end iPhone 5c. Those prices are just a few dollars lower than what Apple spent in order to build the iPhone 5 according to iSuppli’s year-ago report on that device. The firm adds another US$8 in assembly costs for the iPhone 5s, while iPhone 5c assembly tacks on another US$7 to assemble, giving full construction estimates of US$199 for the 5s and between US$173 and US$183 for the 5c.

The iPhone 5, released in 2012, cost Apple about US$205 to produce and sold for between US$649 and US$849 off-contract. Apple saves about US$13 to produce the new high-end iPhone, even considering its beefed up processor and biometric sensor, and Apple sells it for the same price point.

Memory capacity plays a part in the price of an iPhone, with the jump from a 16GB module to a 64GB module adding US$19 to the component cost, plus another US$8 in assembly.

The display components are among the biggest cost contributors for the device, though, amounting to US$41 out of the component cost. IHS believes that Apple’s displays came from a number of vendors, including Sharp, Japan Display Inc., and LG Display.

The use of a polycarbonate shell for the iPhone 5c helps Apple drop the component cost of what is essentially an iPhone 5 even further. Whereas the iPhone 5 was machined from a single piece of aluminum in a costly process, Apple spends only US$173 to build a 16GB iPhone 5 model and US$183 to build the 64GB model.

IHS’ look at the new iPhones seems to agree with some observers’ opinion that the iPhone 5s, despite the addition of a number of technologies, is more of an incremental progression over its predecessor.

“I would say that they’re almost the same phone,” said IHS analyst Andrew Rassweiler, “except for that the 5s has the fingerprint sensor, the A7 processor and some newer memory chips that consume less power. Beyond that, they’re basically the same.”

The lower production cost per unit could work in Apple’s favor going forward. The Cupertino company recently revised its guidance for the September quarter after selling more than nine million new iPhone units in the launch weekend. Part of that guidance revision was to orient investors to look toward the upper range of its previous estimate, possibly due to the improved margins on its hot-selling new devices.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple removes iPhone 5s retail store pick-up option from web site, change may be due to low inventory levels

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Date: Tuesday, September 24th, 2013, 07:32
Category: iPhone, News, retail

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The iPhone 5s is proving popular.

Well…to the point that Apple sold nine million units over the weekend and has now removed its in-store pickup feature for the handset after just one day.

Per The Unofficial Apple Weblog, Apple’s website now says that the iPhone 5s is not eligible for pickup and that all purchases must be made in the store.

It’s unknown as to why the change took place, but it’s possible that the reservation system went online earlier than planned. Apple typically has sold new iPhones in the store on a first-come, first-serve basis for the first few weeks after launch. Once demand and supply start to even out, the company then enables in-store pickup on its website. It’s also possible Apple will turn on the option and turn it off as inventory ebbs and flows.

If you are still on the hunt for an iPhone 5s, your best bet is to keep checking back with Apple, your wireless carrier and retailers like Best Buy, Radio Shack and Walmart. It’ll take time, but your persistence will pay off eventually.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Opinion: A New Personal Computing Paradigm

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, September 24th, 2013, 07:50
Category: iOS, iPad, iPad mini, iPhone, Opinion

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By Robert Snow

How soon before most personal computing can be done with a phone? With a 64-bit iPhone, perhaps quite soon. Imagine the phone as your take everywhere computer:

“Never”, you say, the screen’s too small, even a phablet. When you need a better display, just pull out your touchscreen. It would look like an iPad or iPad Mini only thinner, lighter and cheaper. No CPU or storage. It would connect to your phone via Wi-fi and act as a display and touchscreen input device with a camera, microphone and speaker. It would be indistinguishable from an iPad, so long as your phone is nearby and turned on. Apple is almost there with AirPlay.

Let’s say you do a lot of writing, then you would have a screen with hinged keyboard and trackpad. It would look like a MacBook Air only thinner, lighter and cheaper. Again, no CPU or storage. iOS would recognize the device and work more like OS X. This would require some additional code for iOS. Call it “iOS X”. This would require 64 bits, no question.

Go to work where they have BYOD. On your desk, you would have a display, keyboard and mouse that looked just like an iMac. Again, iOS would need to recognize the larger display, keyboard and mouse and scale up. Imagine an iPhone 6s sporting a processor that is truly “Desktop Class”.

A future iPhone and iOS working this way could dominate the enterprise. Security would be awesome. Your desktop computer would cease to be a computer once you leave work with your phone. Laptop or tablet stolen, no security issues. Of course, the phone is secured by Touch ID and a new phone could be issued and restored from an online backup in no time. Only one computing and communications device per employee. Personal computing could not be more personal. No synchronizing devices. Minimal IT support. Lower cost.

Cloud storage and larger onboard memory would be key to this working.No more costs associated with deploying Microsoft Office or maintaining complicated desktop and laptop operating systems.There would still be a market for powerful desktop and laptop computers, but most employees would simply need a phone as their computer and some specialized input/output device mimicking a tablet, laptop or desktop computer. The phone would of course remain an expensive high-end phone. The upgrade cycle would be brilliant, keep your old IO devices and get a new desktop or laptop computer every two years by simply standing in line for the latest and greatest iPhone, subsidized by your carrier. Apple does make most of its profit on phones and this will sell more of them.

Sure, it would cannibalize iPad and Mac sales by growing a market for these IO devices and not just for the enterprise. Kids, grandparents and folks who just don’t need serious computing power could simplify their life by augmenting their colorful consumer phone with one of these devices. Consumer versions that are even cheaper and clad in plastic. If you need a phone right now, get a smart phone and you no longer need a camera, music player or GPS device. Get an iPhone in a year or two and you will no longer need a tablet, a laptop or a desktop computer. Wearable computing, no problem. Dumb down iOS for a tiny screen and just a few buttons.

A post-PC world on steroids.

One more thing: Home entertainment and in-car entertainment.

Same paradigm and one more reason to buy an iPhone.

iPhone 5s’ 64-bit A7 processor shows possible road map for Apple’s future

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Date: Monday, September 23rd, 2013, 14:55
Category: Hardware, iPhone, News, Software

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If nothing else, the iPhone 5s and 5c launches – and the processors within – offer a glimpse of things to come down the line.

More to the point, they show a future without Intel.

Per Jason Perlow’s excellent column over on ZDNet and pointed out the us by reader Robert Snow, the piece brings up the notion that no one really expected to see a 64-bit System on a Chip this soon and that the term “Desktop Class”, which was being thrown around, seems appropriate and not just hype.

The article also points out that the biometric authentication that Apple is incorporating with its new Touch ID system requires a significant amount of CPU horsepower to pull off without being sluggish, as would strong end-to-end VPN encryption, both of which are likely necessary for the iPhone to continue to attract corporate attention. This, also with increased image-processing power that can push gaming console-quality graphics similar to those found on the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 show that 64-bit mobile architectures are ready for the prime time.

The piece also makes the strong argument that this is where Apple wants to be with its processors and that perhaps Intel – and its mobile offerings – may be left behind, as ARM’s offerings show a more mature platform that various development environments can converge towards.

Take a gander at the article, see what you make of it and, as always, please let us know what you think in the comments.