SpamSieve updated to 2.8.7

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Date: Thursday, September 1st, 2011, 03:35
Category: News, Software


Michael Tsai’s must-have shareware program, SpamSieve, has just been updated to version 2.8.7. The new version, an 8.5 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and improvements, as listed here.

SpamSieve is available for a US$30 registration fee and requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later to run. The new version can either be downloaded directly from the web site or brought up to the current version via the program’s built-in update feature.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

Mozilla releases Firefox 6.0.1 update

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Date: Wednesday, August 31st, 2011, 10:52
Category: News, Software


Late Sunday, released version 6.0.1 of its Firefox web browser. The new version stands as an 28.1 megabyte download offered the following change:

– Revoked the root certificate for DigiNotar due to fraudulent SSL certificate issuance (see bug 682927 and the security advisory).

Firefox 6.0.1 requires an Intel-based Mac and Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback, let us know.

Rumor: Apple to add remote diagnostic tool in iOS 5.0

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Date: Wednesday, August 31st, 2011, 05:19
Category: iPhone, Rumor

It’s always nifty when you can get something fixed remotely.

Per the cool cats at HardMac, Apple has allegedly internally announced to its employees that the new remote diagnostic tool has been completed. Presumably, these features could arrive with this fall’s release of iOS 5, the next major upgrade to Apple’s mobile operating system.

The entirely online system will be triggered by a special URL sent via e-mail or entered manually. When a user visits the website and agrees, Mobile Safari will conduct internal checks of the system and send that data to Apple’s servers.

To ensure user privacy, the only personal data that will be sent to Apple will include its unique identifier, or UDID, as well as the name of the owner, the report said.

The list of information to be shared by the diagnostic system reportedly includes:
Battery health, including current charge level, amount of time since the last charge, minimum level to which the battery was discharged, iOS version installed and whether the handset was turned off normally the last time.

Apple’s iOS 5 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch is set to be released this fall. It will pack more than 200 new user features, including Notification Center, iMessage, and Newsstand.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Data Rescue updated to 3.2.1, adds Lion compatibility, other features

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Date: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011, 11:21
Category: News, Software


On Tuesday, Data Rescue 3, Prosoft Engineering’s data rescue and recovery program, was updated to version 3.2.1. The new version, a 13.6 megabyte download, features the following fixes and changes:

– Added support for recovering Address Book’s database.

– Added suggested locations when selecting a recovery destination folder.

– Improved compatibility with Mac OS X 10.7.

– Improved VoiceOver compatibility.

– Fixed Photoshop PSDs with bit-depths other than 8 not recovering fully.

– Fixed incorrect sorting of scans after one was deleted.

– Fixed permissions on FileIQ .agfm files.

– Fixed total size calculation when Time Machine folders were marked.

– Fixed various crashes related to detecting bad drives.

– Fixed crash when Expert prefs were toggled after selecting Clone.

– Added RAID set partitions to device list.

Data Rescue 3.2.1 retails for US$99 and requires Mac OS X 10.4.11 or later to install and run.

Sprint to hold media event on October 7, may announce iPhone carrier partnership

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Date: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011, 07:44
Category: iPhone, News

The good news is that Sprint looks more likely to become a U.S. iPhone carrier.

The bad news is that Candace Bergen is probably sitting around wondering if they’ll call and ask her to sponsor them 20 years after the fact…

Per Electronista, the telephone carrier sent out invitations on Monday for a Strategy Update event on October 7. The New York City event has few details and will have presentations from executives followed by a question-and-answer session. Topics for the gathering weren’t given out, although it’s implied that it’s a broader corporate move.

The time slot immediately raises suspicion as it dovetails with one rumored iPhone 5 release date as well as a general consensus that Apple is aiming for the first half of that month. At the same time, however, Sprint has hinted at a major rethink of its 4G strategy for the end of the year and may simply use the scheduling to make a push into LTE. Its newly minted LightSquared deal directly opens the possibility of a switch from WiMAX to LTE.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Microsoft VP highlights Windows 8 interface changes, emphasizes upcoming Ribbon features

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Date: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011, 04:18
Category: iOS, News, Software


If Mac OS X 10.7 (“Lion”) was starting to look like Windows 7 (or vice versa), this might be reassuring.

Per a blog entry by Steven Sinofsky, Microsoft’s president of its Windows Division, indicates that one key element of Windows 8 will take the new release in a very different direction than Apple’s outline for Mac OS X.

Sinofsky detailed his thinking behind changes planned for Windows Explorer, which is roughly analogous to Mac OS X’s Finder.

The Windows file system manager originally appeared as “MS DOS Executive,” which exposed DOS commands in a graphical environment with little similarity to the icon-centric Mac desktop.

As Windows began to grow in popularity, Microsoft created an embellished graphical representation of the file system with File Manager. Then, as web browsing became popular, Microsoft brought a browser-like interface to the file system, renaming File Manager as Windows Explorer, complete with a URL-like address bar and prominent back button.

Microsoft has incrementally incorporated Mac-like interface elements in Windows Explorer, with icon-centric file browsing that links documents to their preferred application. Particularly since the release of Mac OS X, Microsoft has incorporated a similar user environment focus that presents the user’s documents, pictures, music and videos rather than just a raw window into the root file system.

Microsoft’s biggest changes in Windows 8 will be an Office-like Ribbon that presents all the major functions in a tall, window-wide control bar. This marks a radical change in thinking compared to Apple’s increasingly minimalistic interface in the Finder, which limits the default buttons to a grouping of view options, a new sorting feature in Mac OS X Lion, a Quick View button, an Action button, and a search field.

Microsoft’s Windows 8 Explorer presents 19 visible buttons in five categories, and that’s just the Home tab. The Ribbon also supplies four other tabs, which function similar to the Mac’s main Menu Bar. Sinofsky explains, “The Home tab is the heart of our new, much more streamlined Explorer experience. The commands that make up 84% of what customers do in Explorer are now all available on this one tab.”

Outside of the graphical interface, Microsoft’s design goals for Windows 8 also mark a new era of computing centered around mobile devices such as tablets. Existing Windows 7 apps won’t run on future ARM-based tablets, but a new secondary environment of web-based apps will, something Microsoft hopes will enable Windows to remain relevant even as the conventional PC market has plateaued and begun to shrink globally.

Apple’s design direction for Mac OS X has opted to incorporate a variety of design elements originally created for iPad, including a simplified, window-less Full Screen mode for apps; limited and simplified control buttons in toolbars; an increasing use of touchpad gestures; and a new security model that encapsulates apps and their documents in a private sandbox.

Apple’s iOS originally appeared on the iPhone without any “file browser,” and even the latest version works hard to avoid any exposure of the underlying file system, despite supporting document-centric apps like iWork. Apps on iOS simply can not present a global view of the underlying filesystem, because all they can see is their own sandbox.

Apple’s iCloud similarly reduces the exposure of file system, replacing MobileMe’s iDisk with a new Documents and Data feature that secures an app’s files and data from access by malware while making the user’s files (and any changes) easier to manage across various devices.

Future versions of Mac OS X will likely continue along the same path, focusing upon self contained apps that create files, rather than a wide open file system (and the security issues related with having any piece of user-level software capable of accessing or wiping out any files in the local user folder).

Yes, the Ribbon shall rule the day after you boot up your Windows partiion either via Boot Camp or your virtualization app of choice.

All hail the Ribbon!!!

Apple seeds updated iTunes 10.5 beta with iCloud iTunes Match feature to developers

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Date: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011, 03:35
Category: iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, News, Software


The rest of the iCloud is coming.

And it will have additional snazzy features.

Per AppleInsider, Apple has released a new version of iTunes for developer testing of the functionality of iCloud’s new iTunes Match feature for storing songs “in the cloud” for flexible access from mobile devices.

Apple has already publicly introduced some new iCloud features in iTunes, including the ability to browse and download any previously purchased songs at no additional charge.

The new iTunes 6.1 beta release is the first to support the “scan and match” cloud access feature that Apple first announced at this summer’s Worldwide Developer Conference.

This new feature allows users to pay for an annual iTunes Match subscription that will make their entire existing music collection (including songs not purchased through iTunes) available from Apple’s cloud servers as well.

The service will support music collections up to 25,000 songs and costs US$24.99 per year. That library limit does not count any songs purchased from iTunes, which are already cloud accessible. The service is also limited to music, and does not support the uploading of apps, audiobooks, books, movies, TV shows, ringtones or interactive content such as iTunes LP liner notes or iTunes Extras for movies.

Users can upload any music they want (up to the 25,000 title limit) onto Apple’s cloud servers, but the biggest feature of iTunes Match is its upload-free, automated file matching service.

Rather than forcing users to upload the many gigabytes of data that thousands of songs would involve, Apple’s iTunes Match will simply scan the user’s library and then make those same songs available from iTunes’ vast catalog of songs, effectively allowing users to upgrade their CD collections into cloud-accessible, high quality iTunes downloads without having to repurchase their music as digital downloads.

The beta program is for developer testing only, and Apple warns that any content copied up to its cloud servers during the test period may be erased. For this reason, developer notes tell users testing the service to back up their original songs, and not to delete any music they’ve uploaded into the service.

Developers participating in the program pay the standard subscription fee, but are given three free months for participating. The iTunes Match feature is currently limited to the Mac version of iTunes only, but once songs are added to the iCloud library, they can be accessed from any computer running the iTunes 10.5 beta as well as any iPhone, iPod touch or iPad running the latest iOS 5 beta.

The iTunes Match service works with up to 10 iTunes PCs and iOS devices connected to the same Apple ID, although only five of those devices can be computers. Apple also notes that a computer or iOS device can only be associated with a new Apple ID once every 90 days.

Apple notes that iTunes Match is currently limited to certain supported song formats “at this time,” and that some songs may be matched incorrectly. Matched songs may also be a different version of the same song.

Apple also tells developers to watch out for performance issues on iOS devices, and notes that under the existing iOS 5 beta, music will continue to download from the cloud over cellular connections even if that option has been restricted to WiFi only in the Settings app.

If you’ve gotten your hands on the new beta and have any feedback, let us know what you think in the comments.

Cocktail 5.0 (Lion Edition) released

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Date: Monday, August 29th, 2011, 09:06
Category: News, Software


Late Wednesday, shareware developer Maintain released version 5.0 of Cocktail (Lion Edition), Cocktail, the popular shareware utility program that allows for additional Mac OS X system tests. The new version, a 2 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and features:

– Added Mac OS X 10.7 compatibility.

– Miscellaneous bug fixes and overall improvements.

– Updated Automator actions.

– Revised Help files.

Cocktail 5.0 retails for a US$19.00 shareware registration fee and requires Mac OS X 10.7 or later to install and run.

Apple seeds updated Mac OS X 10.7.2 build, iCloud beta 9 to developer community

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Date: Monday, August 29th, 2011, 03:25
Category: iCloud, News, Software

Apple on Friday supplied developers with a new beta build of Mac OS X 10.7.2, as well as iCloud for Lion beta 9 for testing purposes, just a few days after the last beta builds were issued.

Per AppleInsider, sources familiar with the latest beta of Lion 10.7.2 said it is known as build 11C43 and carries no known issues. Developers have reportedly been asked to focus on AirPort, AppKit, GraphicsDrivers, iCal, iChat, the Mac App Store, Mail, Spotlight and Time Machine.

Beta builds of Mac OS X are meant for testing purposes only, and are available to members of the Mac Developer Program. The last major update to Lion came just last week in the form of Mac OS X 10.7.1, packing fixes for Wi-Fi reliability, HDMI output resolutions, and optical audio output.

The last beta build of Mac OS X 10.7.2 was issued to developers this Monday. It came along with iCloud beta 8, and similarly on Friday, the new build of 10.7.2 debuted alongside iCloud for Lion beta 9.

iCloud for OS X Lion beta 9 is an add-on installer for Mac OS X 10.7 Lion that adds in-development iCloud functionality to Macs for developers.

If you’ve gotten your mitts on the new builds, please let us know what you make of it via the comments.

Apple gives internship to 19-year-old jailbreak prodigy

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Date: Friday, August 26th, 2011, 04:46
Category: iPhone, News, security

If you’re a good enough hacker and sort of threaten Apple’s warranties to a certain degree, the company might just give you an internship.

According to his Twitter feed, 19-year old Nicholas Allegra, announced that he will start an internship with Apple “the week after next.” Allegra gained notoriety last year when, as a member of the iPhone Dev Team, he released a web-based JailbreakMe exploit for the iPhone 4.

Jailbreaking refers to the process of hacking iOS to allowed users to install custom software and tweaks without Apple’s permission. Performing a jailbreak can, however, void Apple’s warranty for the device.

Allegra made waves again last month when he released an updated version of JailbreakMe for iOS 4.3.3.

According to a profile on him by Forbes earlier this month, Allegra has been on leave from Brown University since last winter while looking for an internship.

The hacker expressed that he’s not sure why he has such a knack for circumventing Apple’s security measures. “It feels like editing an English paper,” Allegra said. “You just go through and look for errors. I don’t know why I seem to be so effective at it.”

Charlie Miller, a former National Security Agency analyst and one of the first people to hack the original iPhone in 2007, was impressed by Allegra’s hack. “I didn’t think anyone would be able to do what he’s done for years,” he said. “Now it’s been done by some kid we had never even heard of. He’s totally blown me away.”

Security researcher Dino Dai Zovi has compared Allegra’s hacking skills to those of government-sponsored “advanced-persistent threat” hackers. “He’s probably five years ahead of them,” he remarked.

Allegra taught himself to program when he was just 9 years old. “By the time I took a computer science class in high school, I already knew everything,” he said. As a self-professed Apple “fanboy,” he confessed that he hacks the iPhone because he likes the challenge.

“I didn’t come out of the same background as the rest of the security community,” he added. “So to them I seem to have come out of nowhere.”

Last year, the U.S. government approved an exemption that made it legal for iPhone owners to jailbreak and carrier unlock their devices.

Apple’s relationship with the jailbreak community has been likened to a game of cat and mouse. The iPhone Dev Team published a post, entitled “The coolest cat,” to their blog on Wednesday with an image of the iconic Tom and Jerry cat and mouse cartoon characters and the note “We loved the chase! Good luck, Steve.” The well-wishes were addressed to Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who announced on Wednesday his resignation as CEO of the company.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.