Google Earth updated to 6.2.0.5905

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Date: Friday, January 27th, 2012, 13:11
Category: News, Software

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On Monday, software giant Google released version 6.2.0.5905 of its popular Google Earth program. The new version, a 34 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

– Seamless imagery of geographic landscapes.

– Improved search results and suggestions.

– Biking and transit directions.

– Screenshot sharing via Google+.

Google Earth 6.2.0.5905 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

EFF looking to keep jailbreaking iOS devices legal in U.S.

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Date: Friday, January 27th, 2012, 13:04
Category: Hack, iOS, iPad, iPhone, News

Since it’s now kind of, sort of legal to jailbreak your iOS device, the Electronic Frontier Foundation aims to keep it that way.

Per AppleInsider, an exemption from the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that has made iPhone “jailbreaking” legal is set to expire, and a digital rights advocacy group hopes the U.S. government will renew and expand that exemption.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation this week reached out to members of the public, asking them to help protect the act of jailbreaking, in which users can hack their iPhone or iPad to run unauthorized code. Up until now, jailbreaking has been legal through exemptions in the DMCA, but that exemption is set to expire this year.

“The DMCA is supposed to block copyright infringement, but it’s been misused to threaten tinkerers and users who just want to make their devices more secure and more functional,” said EFF Senior Staff Attorney Marcia Hofmann. “The U.S. Copyright Office should hear from concerned Americans who want to run software of their choice on the gadgets of their choice.”

The EFF helped to ensure that jailbreaking was granted an exemption in the DMCA in 2010, but this year the group wants to expand it to specifically cover tablets and videogame systems through its “Jailbreaking is Not a Crime” campaign at jailbreakingisnotacrime.org.

The term jailbreaking usually refers to hacking Apple’s iOS devices in order to run software not approved by Apple. But the EFF’s campaign uses jailbreaking as a blanket term for hacking all devices, regardless of platform.

Every few years, the Library of Congress’ Copyright Office authorizes exemptions to ensure existing law does not prevent non-infringing use of copyrighted material. Two years ago, the office officially ruled that jailbreaking is an acceptable practice, though it still voids Apple’s product warranties.

Through jailbreaking, hackers have created their own custom applications which are available from an alternative storefront known as Cydia, similar to Apple’s official App Store for iOS. There are many free and paid applications available on Cydia that allow users to install custom tweaks, user interface themes and various pieces of software that does not comply with Apple’s iOS developer agreement.

While jailbreaking itself is not illegal, the process can be used to pirate software from the App Store, which is against the law. Concern over piracy is one of the main reasons Apple has fought the practice of jailbreaking.

To keep jailbreaking legal, the EFF has asked that supporters sign a letter written by author and hacker Andrew “bunnie” Huang, an MIT graduate who wrote the 2003 book “Hacking the Xbox: An Introduction to Reverse Engineering.” Huang’s letter advocates for expanded jailbreaking exemptions to protect “security researchers and other tinkerers and innovators.”

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple Volume Purchase Program allows businesses to buy iOS apps in bulk

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Date: Thursday, January 26th, 2012, 05:58
Category: iOS, News, retail, Software

Sometimes a business just needs certain App Store apps.

Per Macworld, Apple quietly unveiled a Volume Purchase for Business program (also known as VPP) last summer: Essentially, it’s an App Store specifically for businesses, where they can purchase iOS apps in bulk. It allows developers to custom-tailor software for specific businesses; it also gives Apple another entry into the business market.

Here’s how the Volume Purchase Program works: Businesses create a single Apple ID to manage their purchases. Using that account—which needs to be linked to a corporate credit card or purchasing card—organizations can search for apps and then buy them in bulk.

Once the purchases have been made, Apple issues the company a list of redemption codes for the app. Whoever is managing app distribution for the company can email those codes to employees, allowing them to download the app just by following a link on their Mac, PC, or iOS device. The management interface is updated as users redeem the apps, keeping track of which codes are still available, as well as retaining a full purchase history.

Developers say Apple sets a minimum price of US$10 per app, but after that they’re free to offer custom prices, features, and services to specific customers.

VPP does have its limitations and as of now has yet to expand beyond the United States.

For years, Apple has famously focused on the consumer end of the market. But as more and more of those consumers bring their iPhones and iPads to work, IT departments are increasingly needing to take advantage of those devices; VPP gives Apple a way to help with that and thereby make inroads into the enterprise market.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you’ve ever used the VPP for your business, please let us know about your experience, positive or otherwise.

Delicious Library updated to 2.7.6

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Date: Wednesday, January 25th, 2012, 11:26
Category: News, Software

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On Wednesday, software company Delicious Monster released version 2.7.6 of the shareware favorite, Delicious Library. Delicious Monster allows Macs with webcams to scan the bar codes of any book, movie, music CD or video game, then creates an archive based on background information from the Internet. Additional features help keep the library organized and reseller’s tools allow for items to be quickly posted for sale online.

The update, a 16.4 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

– Fixed a crasher with USB barcode scanning (introduced in 2.7.5, sorry we’re dumb!).

– Fixed a crasher when changing import settings (introduced in 2.0… sorry it took so long!).

Delicious Library 2.7.6 retails for US$40 and requires Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run.

Apple releases firmware updates for early, mid-2010 MacBook Pro notebooks

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Date: Wednesday, January 25th, 2012, 09:58
Category: MacBook Pro, News, Software

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It’s the firmware updates that make all the difference.

On Wednesday, Apple released MacBook Pro EFI Firmware Update 2.5. The update, a 4.1 megabyte download, enables Lion Recovery from an Internet connection, early-2010 MacBook Pro models.

The company also released MacBook EFI Firmware Update 2.1. The update a 3.1 megabyte download, enables Lion Recovery from an Internet connection on mid-2010 MacBook Pro models.

Both updates require Mac OS X 10.7.2 or later to install and run and can be snagged via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature.

If you’ve tried these updates and have either positive or negative feedback to offer, please let us know what you think in the comments.

Shareware solutions available to help resolve iCloud syncing bug

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Date: Wednesday, January 25th, 2012, 09:10
Category: iCloud, News, Software

There are various quotes about labor pains.

And they tend to be pretty darn valid.

Over on the New Jersey end of things, PowerPage head honcho has noticed something you may have seen with your iOS device: despite being hooked into the iCloud, normal bookmarks are having literally thousands of duplicates appear in the Bookmarks Bar and Bookmarks Menu folder. The issue has been noticed over on the Apple boards and to this end, El Jason has penned a good piece as to workarounds, shareware solution and the like over on the Apple Core.

Head on over, take a gander and if you’ve seen this issue on your end or found your own fixes or workarounds, please let us know in the comments.

How-To: Run Adobe Flash Player Content on an Adobe-Free Mac

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Date: Wednesday, January 25th, 2012, 08:00
Category: How-To, Software

You either love or hate Adobe Flash Player.

It’s there, it’s useful, but it can also act like a screaming, colicky infant and be more trouble than it’s worth.

Albeit it DOES allow you to watch hilarious cat videos on YouTube, so who are you to argue?

Even so, for those who ever wondered how they could get all the benefits of Flash Player content without having to have Flash Player itself installed on their Mac, one of the Mac Geek Gab podcast listeners contributed an outstanding how-to piece over to the cool cats at the Mac Observer.

Take a gander, see what you think and until HTML5 becomes the de facto standard, this might restore just a tiny bit of your sanity in the process.

Apple release Mac OS X 10.7.3 build 11D50 to developers with no known issues

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Date: Wednesday, January 25th, 2012, 05:44
Category: News, Software

If you’re hankering for the Mac OS X 10.7.3 update, you probably won’t have much longer to wait.

Per MacNN, a week after the last release, Apple has again posted build 11D50 of the upcoming Mac OS X 10.7.3 for developers. The new version lists no known issues and again asks testers to focus on iCloud Document Storage, Address Book, iCal, Mail, Spotlight, and Safari. The build weighs in at 1.26GB for the combo update, and 997.01MB for the delta release (reversioners are no longer required).

While the company hasn’t identified any issues in several builds now, each subsequent releases is slightly larger than the one before it, suggesting that Apple is still tweaking the codebase. The main features of 10.7.3 are expected to be support for several new languages and issues relating to smart card authentication, Windows file sharing and directory services authentication. Testers are cautioned that they cannot revert to an earlier version of OS X once the beta 10.7.3 is installed.

If you’ve gotten your hands on the current build and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

AT&T looks to transfer $1 billion of wireless spectrum to T-Mobile

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Date: Tuesday, January 24th, 2012, 06:35
Category: iPhone, News

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If you’ve got a spare billion dollars of wireless spectrum just laying about, why WOULDN’T you transfer it to the wireless carrier that you’d made a bid to purchase?

Per the Wall Street Journal, AT&T has filed for FCC approval to transfer wireless spectrum worth US$1 billion to T-Mobile as a result of the failure of its US$39 billion effort to acquire the smaller mobile carrier.

Along with the spectrum, AT&T will give T-Mobile’s German owner Deutsche Telekom US$3 billion in cash as part of its pre-negotiated terms for backing out of the acquisition, which was quashed by the US Justice Department and the FCC as threatening competition in the wireless market.

T-Mobile’s senior vice president for government affairs said “this additional spectrum will help meet the growing demand for wireless broadband services.”

T-Mobile is the only carrier among the US’ top 4 to have not articulated any plans for rolling out LTE 4G service, and is also hampered by its use of non-standard UMTS 3G service. That prevents the carrier from selling Apple’s existing iPhone, which it has cited as a key reason for its poor performance.

T-Mobile has previously indicated that new chipsets could enable future iPhone models to support the company’s existing 3G service. Without building out LTE however, T-Mobile could likely be left behind as support for the new networking standard begins to trickle into the mainstream.

Both T-Mobile and AT&T have referred to their existing HSPA+ networks as 4G, because they can offer data speeds compatible to LTE. However, LTE has future potential well beyond HSPA+.

Apple is expected to release an iPhone model capable of supporting LTE later this year. It has not previously supported LTE until now because of technical issues involving battery life and size.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Google Chrome updated to 16.0.912.77

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Date: Tuesday, January 24th, 2012, 06:39
Category: News, Software

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Google Chrome, Google’s new web browser, just reached version 16.0.912.77 for the Mac. The new version, a 34.9 megabyte download, offers the following change:

– Bug fixes.

Google Chrome 16.0.912.77 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run.