iTunes Festival app drops, no iOS 7.1

Posted by:
Date: Friday, March 7th, 2014, 08:20
Category: Uncategorized

ios7logoWell, so much for insider knowledge. As reported Wednesday, a short post by John Gruber on his blog generated a lot of excitement when it indicated that a source had intimated that an iOS 7.1 update would be out before next week’s iTunes Festival due to the fact that an update for the festival’s app would require 7.1 to run. Here is how the post went;

Apple’s first iTunes Festival in the U.S. starts a week from today at SXSW in Austin. Apple is going to stream the performances to iOS devices using an app, but I’ve heard from a little birdie that the app requires iOS 7.1 (which explains why the app isn’t out yet). That means iOS 7.1 should ship any day now.

(emphasis is mine)

Today’s release of the update to the iTunes Festival app, ahead of any 7.1 update, shows that John’s “birdie” is a gosh darn lier, or maybe it was one of those internal security tests that Apple uses to find out where leaks are coming from, but either way, the wait for 7.1 continues. John responded today with, “You win some, you lose some.”.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled speculation.

 

 

What’s coming up on the PowerPage?

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, January 28th, 2014, 16:13
Category: Announcement, App Store, Apple, Features, Hardware, Interview, iOS, iPhone, Mac, Review, Software, Uncategorized

PP bolt logoI thought I’d take some time out to mention one of the things we have planned for the PowerPage this year. As a result, you may see things get jumbled around a bit while we figure out the best way to organize it.

We’ll soon be doing more software and hardware reviews as regular features. The hope is to bring more detailed information and feedback so that our readers can make better choices about the things they need. We are also hoping that readers will send us requests on what they want to see reviewed. How’s that for interaction! Separately, we’ll also be doing regular reviews of iPhone and iPad apps to help wade through the billions of apps piling up in the AppStore.

What? There’s more?! Now, I’m not promising anything, but we’d like to bring you some interview content, in either audio or video form, from Macworld/iWorld in March. Sounds like I’m going to be busy.

Google Earth updated to 7.1.2.2019

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Date: Thursday, October 3rd, 2013, 06:28
Category: Uncategorized

On Wednesday, software giant Google released version 7.1.2.2019 of its popular Google Earth program. The new version, a 45 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:
- The “Enable Controller” option in user preferences is now turned off by default. This prevents red directional arrows from displaying as a result of uncalibrated joysticks and other controllers being connected to Earth at startup.
- For enhanced security, “Use HTTPS for Google connections” is now toggled on by default.
- We fixed a bug whereby the cache size rose above user-specified limits.
- We fixed a crash resulting from searching on some Windows machines.
- We updated the LEAP API to version 1.08.
- We reduced LEAP controller sensitivity to user hand motions. This enables a smoother flight and greater control over your flight path when using a LEAP.
Google Earth 7.1.2.2019 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.
If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

Google Chrome updated to 30.0.1599.66

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Date: Thursday, October 3rd, 2013, 06:58
Category: Uncategorized

They grow up so fast…

On Wednesday, Google released version 30.0.1599.66 of its Chrome web browser. The update, a 53.7 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

Fixes and Improvements:
- Easier searching by image.

- A number of new apps/extension APIs.

- Lots of under the hood changes for stability and performance.

Security Fixes:
- Races in Web Audio.

- Out of bounds read in Window.prototype object.

- Address bar spoofing related to the “204 No Content” status code.

- Use after free in inline-block rendering.

- Use-after-free in Web Audio.

- Use-after-free in XSLT.

- Use-after-free in PPAPI.

- Use-after-free in XML document parsing.

- Use after free in the Windows color chooser dialog.

- Address bar spoofing via a malformed scheme.

- Address bar spoofing related to the “204 No Content” status code.

- Out of bounds read in Web Audio.

- Use-after-free in DOM.

- Memory corruption in V8.

- Out of bounds read in URL parsing.

- Use-after-free in resource loader.

- Use-after-free in template element.

- Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives (Chrome 30).

- Use-after-free in ICU.

Google Chrome 30.0.1599.66 requires an Intel-based Mac with Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run. If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Hello world!

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, September 17th, 2013, 17:01
Category: Uncategorized

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Case Study Points Out How to Avoid RSI-Causing Positions to Avoid When Using a Notebook

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009, 06:56
Category: Uncategorized

Let’s face it, as convenient as notebook computers are, if you use them in the wrong position, you’re in for a fair amount of repetitive stress injury pain. The guys over at the Core77 blog highlighted ten common usage positions and marked the pain points you’re asking for down the road with each.

Take a gander and let us know if you have a best or worst computing position:

500x_pain-points

Apple Releases Bluetooth Firmware Update

Posted by:
Date: Thursday, June 18th, 2009, 18:31
Category: Software, Uncategorized

bluetooth_icon

Yet another update appearing in Software Update on Macs Wednesday was the Bluetooth Firmware Update 2.0 (a 1.6 megabyte download).

This update provides bug fixes and better compatibility with the Apple Wireless Mighty Mouse and Apple Wireless Keyboard. It installs on all Macintosh systems with Bluetooth based on the Broadcom chipset.

The update can be applied through Software Update or downloaded as a stand-alone installer from Apple’s web site here.

Truphone 3.0 Released

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, April 29th, 2009, 23:26
Category: iPhone, Software, Uncategorized

Software Cellular Network Ltd., makers of Truphone software and call services, released version 3.0 of its popular iPhone app. The new version, available in the App Store (iTunes link), adds the following new features:

truphone_iphone.png
  • View your call history in real time.
  • Instant messenger tool is now integrated into the app.
  • Super-clear sound and improved reliability.

The new version requires an iPhone running firmware 2.1 or higher.

Versions of Truphone are also available for the iPod Touch and G1 (Android) Smartphone.

This Is Only A Test

Posted by:
Date: Saturday, April 11th, 2009, 17:08
Category: Uncategorized

I’m using strongMarsEdit/strong to help troubleshoot some editor issues I have been seeing with the new strongPowerPage/strong web site. I have noticed that there are occasionally some link issues, at least with MarsEdit, which I may have to bring up with the developer.

img src=”http://www2.powerpage.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/resizedimage368447-journalism.jpg” alt=”ResizedImage368447-Journalism.jpg” border=”0″ width=”100″ height=”121″ align=”right” /

The trick now is to see if the tags and image links work correctly with alignment, etc. One of the advantages of a href=”http://www.wordpress.org”WordPress/a is the ability to use offline editors like MarsEdit.

There have been a couple of updates to MarsEdit recently which might have improved compatibility with WordPress 2.7, so maybe emthat/em will solve all the issues.

Intel Updates Processor Road Map, Looks to 32-Nanometer Chips

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Date: Wednesday, February 11th, 2009, 08:44
Category: Uncategorized

intellogo.jpg
Processor manufacturer Intel announced on Tuesday that it plans to release two dual-core notebook and desktop processors while juggling manufacturing efforts to cut costs.
According to Macworld UK, the company will ship dual-core processors for mainstream notebooks and desktops made using the 32-nanometer process and skip plans to release similar chips manufactured using the 45-nm process.
The chips in question will ship in the fourth quarter of this year.
Company officials went on to state that such a road map update will bring the latest technologies to notebooks and desktops but did not comment as to exactly when in the fourth quarter the processors would be available.
The 32 nanometer-process chips will be an upgrade over existing 45-nanometer chips that go into current desktops and laptops, will be cheaper to manufacture, work faster and draw less power.
The new dual-core laptop chips, code-named “Arrandale”, will replace the Nehalem-based Auburndale processors according to company officials. Intel will also ship 32 nanometer dual-core desktop chips code-named “Clarkdale”, which will replace the company’s Nehalem-based Havendale chips.
The Arrandale series will boost graphics performance while drawing less power than Core 2 processors, said Stephen Smith, vice president and director of group operations at Intel. The new chips will also be more energy-efficient, which could improve laptop battery life.
The clock speeds will be similar to chips used in existing laptops, but offer better performance at a similar power envelope by running more threads via each core.
The new chips will be part of the company’s Westmere microarchitecture, which is a shrink of Intel’s existing Nehalem microarchitecture. Nehalem, which is used in Intel’s Core i7 desktop, integrates a memory controller and provides a faster pipe for the CPU to communicate with system components.
The new architecture is considered a significant upgrade over Intel’s earlier microarchitectures, as it cuts bottlenecks to improve system speed and performance-per-watt.
Earlier on Tuesday, Intel CEO Paul Otellini said the company will spend US$7 billion over the next two years to revamp manufacturing plants.
The new manufacturing process will also help create tiny integrated chips that can be fit into devices like set-top boxes and TVs, Intel said during its fourth-quarter earnings call in January. This move could help Intel enter new markets and add revenue opportunities.
Intel will begin producing chips with 32-nanometer circuitry in four fabrication plants starting in late 2009.
Stay tuned for additional details and let us know what you think in the comments or forums.

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