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Apple states HomeKit-based devices to surface in June, refutes reports of delays

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Date: Friday, May 15th, 2015, 08:31
Category: Developer, iPad, iPhone, News, Software, Uncategorized


The HomeKit stuff will begin arriving in June according to Apple.

Refuting a recent report claiming delays with the home automation software platform would push back the launch until August or September, Apple spokeswoman Trudy Muller went on record as saying that “HomeKit [hardware certification] has been available for just a few months and we already have dozens of partners who have committed to bringing HomeKit accessories to market and we’re looking forward to the first ones coming next month.”


Verizon Wireless, Sprint to pay $158 million in settlement fees for overcharging practices

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Date: Wednesday, May 13th, 2015, 07:33
Category: News, Uncategorized, wireless


You might want to check your Verizon Wireless or Sprint bill to make sure it’s accurate.

Or at least look into the class action lawsuit against the carriers to see if you qualify for part of the settlement.

Wireless carriers Verizon Wireless and Sprint will pay a combined total of US$158 million to settle billing complain charges filed by the Federal Communications Commission.


Tech blogger posts videos of Apple Watch surviving 1,200 meter swim test, other challenges

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Date: Monday, May 11th, 2015, 08:23
Category: Apple Watch, Hardware, News, Uncategorized, Wearables


Now that the Apple Watch is out, it’s time to put it through a battery of physical tests, including water-based ones.

The good news is that the device seems to hold up pretty well. Over the weekend, endurance sports and tech blogger Ray Maker posted a few Apple Watch-related waterproof videos, including the first lap swimming test with Apple’s new wearable.

In the first video, Maker tests the Apple Watch against higher-intensity swimming activities. As he notes, “It’s the wrist hitting the water that’s so difficult for watch waterproofing due to the impact forces,” so that’s what he decides to focus on in the test. After about 25 minutes in the water and a 1200 meter swim, Maker found results similar to most other waterproofing tests over the past few weeks – the Apple Watch remains seemingly unharmed by even the most daunting submerged water tests.


Additional teardown, analysis finds Apple Watch CPU/GPU manufactured via Samsung’s 28-Nanometer process

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Date: Friday, May 8th, 2015, 07:27
Category: Apple Watch, Hardware, News, Processors, Uncategorized, Wearables


The Apple Watch has gone through a number of teardowns since its release on April 24. The newest release from Chipworks has revealed the wearable to feature 512MB of RAM, a Broadcom Wi-Fi chip, an accelerometer/gyrometer from STMicroelectronics, 30 individual components inside the 26mm x 28mm S1 package, a feat Chipworks calls “quite an accomplishment.”

Among the more interesting discoveries Chipworks has made is the manufacturing process for the APL0778 application processor (CPU/GPU). It was made with Samsung’s 28 nanometer LP process, which is no longer cutting edge technology. A 28-nanometer processor was also used in the iPhone 5s, while the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus used 20-nanometer A8 processors.


Tests show Apple Watch heart rate sensor to be nearly on par with Mio’s Alpha unit

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Date: Friday, May 8th, 2015, 07:27
Category: Apple Watch, Hardware, News, Uncategorized, Wearables


Apple picked a good heart rate sensor for the Apple Watch.

After a series of tests by Mac and iOS developer Brad Larson in which raw data was extracted from both devices, the heart rate sensor on the Apple Watch was determined to be nearly on par with the Mio Alpha, a popular dedicated heart rate sensor also worn on the wrist. The Alpha produced sharper peaks, which may suggest more filtering on the Watch, but in most cases the data produced was essentially equal.


T-Mobile responds to Verizon campaign, offers improved incentives in try-out and switch deal

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Date: Tuesday, May 5th, 2015, 07:38
Category: iPhone, News, retail, Uncategorized, wireless


It’s competition that makes life interesting.

Wireless carrier T-Mobile is responding to Verizon’s “Never Settle” ad campaign, which offers to lend Verizon customers a new smartphone and port their existing number to it for a 14-day trial. If customers prefer T-Mobile’s service, the company will pay off Verizon’s Early Termination Fees up to a maximum of US$650.

T-Mobile is also offering to settle any outstanding payments on your phone within the US$650 limit when customers go with T-Mobile’s Simple Choice plan.


Reserve Strap, other outfits, eye Apple Watch diagnostic port for accessories

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Date: Monday, May 4th, 2015, 08:41
Category: Accessory, Apple Watch, Hardware, News, Uncategorized, Wearables


Sometimes it’s the lesser known ports that allow for the best peripherals.

A number of third party vendors are looking to use the small diagnostic port hidden inside one of the Apple Watch’s lugs to charge the device. One accessory maker discussed this approach, opening up the possibility of a “Made for Apple Watch” program down the line.

“Our engineers have been able to independently confirm that the 6-pin diagnostic port underneath the Apple Watch case can be used for charging,” the designers of battery band Reserve Strap wrote in a recent post. This is an undocumented functionality, and there is no word on whether Apple will allow continued access via the port.


20 Apple Watch apps worth a flick of your wrist

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Date: Tuesday, April 28th, 2015, 05:28
Category: Uncategorized

Calling them “apps” is a bit of a misnomer because third-party apps don’t really run natively on Apple Watch – yet. They’re more like extensions or views of apps that are running on your iPhone, but I digress. Watch apps are a little laggy at launch – get used to looking at the spinning flower – but there are times when viewing little bits of information on your wrist can be useful, especially notifications. Most importantly, it doesn’t come with all the baggage and distractions that turn your iPhone into a blackhole of time that you can never get back. After spending the weekend with Apple Watch, here are a few of the initial standout apps.

Redfin Apple Watch appRedfin, Zillow, Estately (in that order). I’m looking to purchase a house and it’s extremely helpful to open a watch app and see homes for sale near me. Alerts are what will separate the real estate apps – and none of them do it well currently. I’m stunned that Realtor.com got caught flat-footed and didn’t have a Watch app ready on Friday.

Hue. It’s extremely useful to be able to switch my home’s Hue light scene from the Apple Watch. It’s a purpose-built watch app that does just what you need it to do and nothing else.

Apple weather. Apple’s first-party weather app for Watch is my favorite for two reasons: 1) it’s linked from the weather widget on the watch face, and 2) it displays the forecast with one scroll of the crown. Dark Sky has the best notifications and Weather Nerd has the best data-rich screens.

Cufflink browser bills itself as the first web browser for Apple Watch is simple and effective. Search with your voice and get a list of results. It’s a bit of a black box to me, but worked reasonably well.

Read on for 10 more Apple Watch apps that are worth a flick of your wrist.


AppleCare+ plan, service prices for Apple Watch units unveiled

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Date: Friday, April 10th, 2015, 08:37
Category: AppleCare, Hardware, News, Uncategorized, Wearables


How much is your AppleCare+ plan going to be for your snazzy new Apple Watch?

Apple has an answer for that.

With Apple Watch preorders opening last night/the Watchening, specific numbers have surfaced for AppleCare+ and repair fees for out-of warranty watches. These numbers are a bit frightening, as a coverage plan for an Apple Watch Edition model can rise into the thousands of dollars.


Swifty app helps teach Swift programming basics on your iOS device

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Date: Monday, March 23rd, 2015, 06:02
Category: Developer, iOS, News, Uncategorized


This qualifies as both useful and cool.

Last summer, Apple surprised almost everyone at WWDC with the announcement of Swift, a new programming language for iOS and Mac development.

The language feels like something Apple would invent. Like several of the languages currently popular in web development, it has a concise, readable syntax that’s easier to pick up than Apple’s older language, Objective-C. It was engineered by Apple’s compiler experts, so in addition to being compatible with existing code and Cocoa libraries, it’s also faster by some metrics.

But even though Apple’s tagline for the language is that it “lets everyone build amazing apps,” no novice is going to pick up Swift and get to coding full-on iOS or Mac apps without some guidance. For those beginning to work with Swift, the Swifty App provides an interactive set of tutorials that gradually guide you through the basics of Swift on your iOS device.