Apple releases, 2TB, 3TB capacity Time Capsule units

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Date: Tuesday, June 21st, 2011, 06:02
Category: News, Time Capsule, wireless

Apple on Tuesday quietly released new models of Time Capsule, its combination backup drive and wireless base station.The new Time Capsules are available in 2TB and 3TB capacities—previously, Time Capsule had topped out at 2TB.

Per Macworld, the new Time Capsules still use the 802.11n Wi-Fi networking standard, with dual-band operation available for 802.11b/g devices like the iPhone and iPod touch. Other than the boosted hard drive capacities, it doesn’t appear the new Time Capsules boast any new features.

The 2TB Time Capsule retails for US$299 while the 3TB model sells for US$499; those prices are unchanged from the previous 1TB and 2TB offerings, respectively.

If you’ve tried the new Time Capsule units and have any feedback to offer, let us know.

Recently discovered FCC filing points towards upcoming AirPort Extreme device

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Date: Tuesday, June 21st, 2011, 04:11
Category: News, wireless

Sometimes it’s the FCC filings that give it away.

Per Engadget, A new filing with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission has revealed an updated AirPort Extreme wireless base station from Apple is forthcoming.

The new hardware was outed this week by an FCC filing, made by Apple on June 16, which shows a 3×3 802.11n access point, dubbed model A1408.

The label includes mention of AirPort IDs in both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz range, as well as an Ethernet ID. The hardware carries an FCC ID of BCGA1408.

The documents do not reveal what may have changed in the new hardware model, but it’s likely the new hardware is set for imminent release given the timing of the FCC filing.

Last week, Apple updated its AirPort Utility, and the software contains references to a new fourth-generation Time Capsule and fifth-generation AirPort Extreme. No mention of a new Time Capsule was made in the latest FCC filings, but given that stock of the hardware has run dry along with AirPort base stations, it’s a likely candidate for a refresh as well.

Various rumors have claimed that Apple may shift its base stations to run iOS. This transition could allow for more robust features, like print and media streaming services, integration with iCloud, and cached wireless software updates.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple AirPort Utility 5.5.3 update may point towards next-gen AirPort Extreme, Time Capsule devices

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Date: Wednesday, June 15th, 2011, 03:51
Category: News, Time Capsule, wireless


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It may be a small update, but it could mean something more.

Per AppleInsider, a routine update to Apple’s Airport Utility application contains references to new 4th generation Time Capsule and 5th generation AirPort Extreme devices, according to a new report.

After Apple released the AirPort Utility 5.5.3 update for Windows and Mac on Monday, device listings were uncovered in the update’s binary, MacRumors reports. Apple’s documentation for the 10MB downloads lists only that it “resolves an issue that caused the AirPort Utitlity to unexpectedly quit during setup.”

Of particular interest are listings for “K31 K30B Time Capsule (Simultaneous Dual-Band, Gen3)” and “K10B Apple AirPort Extreme (Simultaneous Dual-Band, Gen3).” Elsewhere in the code for the utility, the rumored devices are reportedly listed as “Time Capsule 802.11n (4th Generation)” and “AirPort Extreme 802.11n (5th Generation).”

Apple’s current simultaneous dual-band AirPort products, which were last updated in October 2009, are described as “Gen2.”

Recent reports have suggested that available stock of Apple’s AirPort and Time Capsule wireless base stations has dwindled ahead of a product update. The latest rumors claim Apple may shift the base stations to run iOS.

iOS-based AirPort base stations could allow for more robust features, such as print and media streaming services, integration with iCloud, and cached wireless software updates. Code references in AirPort Utility seem to support the likelihood of software update caching, according to people familiar with the matter.

Also, indications that Apple is working on wireless drivers for non-Intel CPUs may point to the possibility that Apple plans to enable iOS devices to setup and configure new AirPort or Time Capsule devices without the help of a Mac or Windows PC. Such a move could align with Apple’s Post PC strategy, as the company recently revealed that the forthcoming iOS 5 has been designed to be “PC Free” by way of wireless activation, syncing and backup.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

AT&T to argue need for T-Mobile resources, spectrum, in merger deal

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Date: Friday, June 10th, 2011, 06:13
Category: iPhone, News, wireless

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You may not think too highly of wireless carrier AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile USA, but apparently it’s necessary for the company to move forward.

This was the statement from company officials on Thursday, who said the deal would allow AT&T to significantly improve its mobile network capacity and give better service to its customers.

Critics of the deal, including competitor Sprint Nextel, are incorrect in asserting that AT&T is sitting on mobile spectrum, said Bob Quinn, AT&T’s senior vice president for federal regulatory affairs in a Macworld article. The proposed US$39 billion deal, announced in March, is a “very clean and quick way to deal with some of the spectrum issues that are facing this country and this company in particular,” he said during a press briefing.

The deal is necessary because AT&T is facing a spectrum shortage as mobile broadband use continues to skyrocket, the company has argued. While critics have suggested AT&T is hoarding spectrum, the company is using its 700MHz spectrum, acquired in 2008 auctions, and its AWS (advanced wireless services) spectrum to roll out 4G LTE (long-term evolution) service, Quinn said.

Sprint has questioned why AT&T, with the largest spectrum holdings of any U.S. carrier, needs T-Mobile. “AT&T has repeatedly reassured investors that it has the spectrum and network capacity it needs to meet the growing demand for data services,” Sprint said in a May 31 filing at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. “If AT&T has capacity constraints, they are the result of its failure to upgrade and invest in its network. AT&T has lagged significantly in network investment.”

Dozens of groups have voiced opposition to the merger between the second-largest mobile carrier in the U.S. and the fourth-largest. The merger would reduce competition in the mobile market and likely drive up prices, said critics including Public Knowledge, the Rural Telecommunications Group and the NoChokePoints Coalition, a coalition of telecom customers, consumer groups and small carriers concerned with mobile backhaul rates.

The merged company would be “contrary to the express policies of Congress and the Commission to rely on competition rather than regulation to protect consumers and spur deployment of new services,” Public Knowledge and the Future of Music Coalition wrote in a May 31 filing to the FCC.

The combined company would be the largest mobile provider in the U.S. and would be able to assert control over mobile handsets, applications, equipment and protocol development, Public Knowledge and the Future of Music Coalition said in their filing.

But AT&T, in a response filing to be sent to the FCC on Friday, will argue the merger will be good for mobile customers. By combining networks, AT&T will be able to increase its mobile capacity by 60% in New York City in the short term, and by more than 80% in the long term, Quinn said.

Los Angeles and San Diego would both see short-term spectrum gains of more than 45%, Quinn said.

The merger would give AT&T more spectrum and cell tower coverage, giving customers better mobile data service, he said. AT&T has tried other ways to improve capacity, including distributed antenna systems and Wi-Fi hotspots, Quinn said.

“We are not stupid,” he said. “We’ve been in the wireless business for a long time. We’ve tried all of these as short-term methods … to fix and provide for more capacity. While they give you some short-term benefit, they’re not long-term benefits to address the kind of bandwidth demands that we’re seeing.”

AT&T, in its FCC filing, will also note support for the merger from dozens of groups, including 15 state governors, 10 labor unions, nine venture capital firms and several tech firms, including Microsoft, Facebook, Oracle and Yahoo, Quinn said.

Many groups supporting the merger see the potential for AT&T to bring mobile broadband to more corners of the nation, he said. AT&T has said it plans to cover 97% of the U.S. population with 4G service if the merger is approved by the FCC and the U.S. Department of Justice. Right now, the company plans to cover 80% of the population with 4G service.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Sprint MiFi 4082 unit picture leaked, device anticipated around CES

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Date: Friday, December 31st, 2010, 05:19
Category: Accessory, News, wireless

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Because MiFi units are always useful…

Per Electronista, a forum post late Wednesday on sprintusers.com provided the first look at the finished version of one of Novatel’s first 4G routers, the MiFi 4082 for Sprint. The hybrid WiMAX and EVDO router spotted by SprintUsers veteran r0fl shows an at least superficially upscale design with a brushed metal effect and chrome trim. Its design still adopts the familiar pocketable shape but has extra indicators for signal strength and what may be the presence of 4G speed.

The 4082 is believed to be shipping by January 30 and could be unveiled at CES next week. Novatel is likely to have an LTE counterpart to the 4082 for Verizon and other carriers using the more widely adopted 4G standard, but significant details haven’t emerged to date.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases AirPort Utility 5.5.2

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Date: Friday, December 17th, 2010, 05:22
Category: News, Software, wireless

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Late Thursday, Apple released AirPort Utility 5.5.2, a 10.2 megabyte download which offers the following fixes to the AirPort Utility software:

- Resolves an issue that caused the DHCP settings tab to display incorrectly.

- Resolves an issue that caused the application to quit unexpectedly when automatically launched.

- Resolves an issue that prevented the network password from being stored in the Keychain when the network on the 5GHz band was named differently.

The update requires Mac OS X 10.5.7 or later to install and run and the AirPort Utility update can be located, snagged and installed via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature or via the update feature in Airport Utility itself.

Apple releases Time Capsule and AirPort Base Station Firmware 7.5.2

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Date: Friday, December 17th, 2010, 05:22
Category: News, Software, wireless

Late Friday, Apple released its Time Capsule and AirPort Base Station Firmware 7.5.2. The update provides bug fixes for all 802.11n AirPort Extreme Base Stations, AirPort Express Base Stations, and Time Capsules. Some of the fixes include the following:

- General fixes to Wi-Fi base station stability.

- Fixes some issues with AirPlay streaming.

- General fixes with USB interoperability including connection to external storage devices.

- Fixes some issues with NAT port mapping settings.

- Disables TKIP security with 802.11n rates per the Wi-Fi Alliance specifications.

The update can be found, downloaded and installed via the software update feature in the AirPort Utility program (Applications–>Utilities), takes about a minute to install and requires Mac OS X 10.4 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new firmware and noticed any changes, please let us know.

Intel purchases Infineon’s wireless unit for $1.4 billion, gains access to new chipsets in deal

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Date: Monday, August 30th, 2010, 04:59
Category: News, wireless

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Processor giant Intel on Monday confirmed its plans to buy Infineon’s wireless division for US$1.4 billion in cash. The deal will see the company’s Wireless Solutions group work as a stand-alone company on Intel’s behalf and will give the company access to both 3G chipsets and a faster path to LTE-based 4G. It plans to use these not only for full-size notebooks but also Atom-based smartphones and tablets.

Per Electronista, Infineon claimed the selloff was a win as it allowed a new focus on car, industrial and security technology. The sale is widely known to be prompted by the company’s struggles with making its wireless section profitable.

The deal should be finished by early 2011.

In an attempt to head off concerns, Intel said the stand-alone nature of the wireless group would let it keep serving existing customers, including those who use ARM chips. Concerns had been raised that the buyout would be used to force Apple to seek alternate suppliers for 3G chipsets in the iPad and iPhone, although the iPhone 4 is exempt as it has switched away.

Intel’s plans are due to come together until 2011, when its Oak Trail platform for Atom chips should be efficient enough to be competitive.

Apple releases AirPort Utility 5.5.1, updated firmware for Time Capsule, late 2009 AirPort Extreme units

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Date: Thursday, April 1st, 2010, 04:28
Category: Software, wireless


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Late Wednesday, Apple released AirPort Utility 5.5.1, a 10.2 megabyte download which offers the following fixes to the AirPort Utility software:

- Not importing all settings when importing a configuration.

- Not propagating MAC address control lists when using an extended network.

The company also released a firmware update for its Time Capsule and late 2009 AirPort Extreme Base Station devices. The updated firmware repairs a problem with wireless performance in the 5GHz band and an issue with creating a Guest Network in that same band.

Both updates require Mac OS X 10.5.7 or later to install and run and the AirPort Utility update can be located, snagged and installed via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature or via the update feature in Airport Utility itself.

QuickerTek Releases Wireless nCard for Older MacBooks, Mac Minis

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Date: Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010, 06:31
Category: Accessory, MacBook, MacBook Pro, wireless

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It’s not quite as cool as whatever the iPad will become, but it’s useful stuff.

The cool cats at QuickerTek have released a new wireless nCard accessory for older MacBook notebooks and the Mac mini. The nCard extends Wi-Fi compatibility on the A, B, G and N standard and installs in the internal Airport card slot, with similar complexity to installing RAM chips. Per MacNN, the components are claimed to offer higher signal sensitivity and transmission power for potentially faster speeds and a wider reception area. Reception can also be further improved with an optional external antenna.

The nCard is compatible with 2006 through 2009 Mac minis but not the G4-based Minis, however and the 2006 through 2009 black and white plastic MacBook notebooks. The nCard also works in the 2006 through 2008 MacBook Pros in both the 15″ and 17″ inch models, excluding the unibody models.

The nCard is now shipping and is available for US$90.