Core Duo and Battery Consumption

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Date: Tuesday, January 17th, 2006, 23:57
Category: Intel

intel-core-duo-logo.gifFrom a mailing list posting by Jason Watkins, SAS Computing:

Here are some facts about “Core Duo” that may shed some light on the questions of battery consumption in the new MacBook Pro laptops.
“Yonah,” the code-name that Core Duo previously went under, features 151 million transistors on a single die, dual core chip. Each core is equipped with 2MB of L2 “smart” caches, which can be combined when only one core is in use (4MB L2 Cache!). To preserve processing efficiency, both of the core’s L1 cache is kept full of data, regardless of core usage.
Bus speeds range from 533MHz to 667MHz. Power consumption is said to be equal to its predecessor, Pentium M. Intel plans to close the book on the Pentium M, following the release of Core Duo processors. Data is moved in and out of the cores as quickly as possible, and L2 is then flushed to RAM. After that the cores can be shut down, saving power. Will we need RAM defragmenting utilities now?
Information was obtained from Intel, and Maximum PC Magazine.


intel-core-duo-logo.gifFrom a mailing list posting by Jason Watkins, SAS Computing:

Here are some facts about “Core Duo” that may shed some light on the questions of battery consumption in the new MacBook Pro laptops.
“Yonah,” the code-name that Core Duo previously went under, features 151 million transistors on a single die, dual core chip. Each core is equipped with 2MB of L2 “smart” caches, which can be combined when only one core is in use (4MB L2 Cache!). To preserve processing efficiency, both of the core’s L1 cache is kept full of data, regardless of core usage.
Bus speeds range from 533MHz to 667MHz. Power consumption is said to be equal to its predecessor, Pentium M. Intel plans to close the book on the Pentium M, following the release of Core Duo processors. Data is moved in and out of the cores as quickly as possible, and L2 is then flushed to RAM. After that the cores can be shut down, saving power. Will we need RAM defragmenting utilities now?
Information was obtained from Intel, and Maximum PC Magazine.

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