Fixing .Mac – Hyperblog the Web

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Date: Monday, June 19th, 2006, 08:00
Category: Uncategorized

Lots of existing Web sites already allow their community of members to submit web links of interesting content for indexing, sharing, and comment. Slashdot has a beta system for tagging submissions with metadata, while Digg users can give stories and comments a thumbs up or down, progressively raising or lowering an item’s visibility. Third Voice was a dotcom that built an Internet Explorer plugin that allowed users to associate comments with web sites, which then popped up like a Post It note for other users who had the plugin.
Why Apple Can Deliver this:
Apple could one-up existing services (and previous failures) by applying the company’s unique position and abilities I described earlier. For starters, Apple has (1) a network of users, and (2) owns an OS and a browser. That means they can build functions into Safari and distribute the functionality with Mac OS X. The system would be (3) given away for free, and is financed as part of .Mac, which users (6) trust with their data. Further, Apple has proven they can build things that (7) work, are (8) usable by mere mortals, (9) very cool, and (10) will actually get finished.
Here’s how it works…
Contributed by: Daniel Eran, RoughlyDrafted


Lots of existing Web sites already allow their community of members to submit web links of interesting content for indexing, sharing, and comment. Slashdot has a beta system for tagging submissions with metadata, while Digg users can give stories and comments a thumbs up or down, progressively raising or lowering an item’s visibility. Third Voice was a dotcom that built an Internet Explorer plugin that allowed users to associate comments with web sites, which then popped up like a Post It note for other users who had the plugin.
Why Apple Can Deliver this:
Apple could one-up existing services (and previous failures) by applying the company’s unique position and abilities I described earlier. For starters, Apple has (1) a network of users, and (2) owns an OS and a browser. That means they can build functions into Safari and distribute the functionality with Mac OS X. The system would be (3) given away for free, and is financed as part of .Mac, which users (6) trust with their data. Further, Apple has proven they can build things that (7) work, are (8) usable by mere mortals, (9) very cool, and (10) will actually get finished.
Here’s how it works:
http://www.roughlydrafted.com/RD/Home/6A50F25B-9E50-45B4-AA17-F145B5D091EE.html
Contributed by: Daniel Eran, RoughlyDrafted

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