Keeping Your Mobile Computer Secure

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Date: Wednesday, November 24th, 2004, 10:25
Category: Archive

A MacInTouch thread on Mobile Security discusses some tips for keeping the data on your PowerBook, iPod or USB Flash ROM safe while traveling. In light of today being the most traveled day of the year due to the Thanksgiving holiday (in the United States) it makes some sense to take precautions if you travel with your data – and who doesn’t.

#1 The recent NSA report explains how to place Mac OS X keychains on USB tokens. Encrypted disk images can also be placed on tokens, including iPods. Either approach can make encrypted credentials portable across Macs.
#2 If you need to be able to use random PCs, too, consider carrying a bootable Live CD or USB token. For example, this article: “Linux on a flash drive” describes how to place SLAX on a USB token. Also, look at the Tinfoil Hat project for a thoughtful, full-out attack on the mobile security problem. This approach allows you to carry a complete, trusted software baseline with you, and bypass the hard disk in that random PC.

Click through for the links and don’t eat too much turkey.
Note: The PowerPage will be publishing on a limited schedule until Monday, please enjoy the Holiday and spending some time with your family and friends.


A MacInTouch thread on Mobile Security discusses some tips for keeping the data on your PowerBook, iPod or USB Flash ROM safe while traveling. In light of today being the most traveled day of the year due to the Thanksgiving holiday (in the United States) it makes some sense to take precautions if you travel with your data – and who doesn’t.

#1 The recent NSA report explains how to place Mac OS X keychains on USB tokens. Encrypted disk images can also be placed on tokens, including iPods. Either approach can make encrypted credentials portable across Macs.
#2 If you need to be able to use random PCs, too, consider carrying a bootable Live CD or USB token. For example, this article: “Linux on a flash drive” describes how to place SLAX on a USB token. Also, look at the Tinfoil Hat project for a thoughtful, full-out attack on the mobile security problem. This approach allows you to carry a complete, trusted software baseline with you, and bypass the hard disk in that random PC.

Click through for the links and don’t eat too much turkey.
Note: The PowerPage will be publishing on a limited schedule until Monday, please enjoy the Holiday and spending some time with your family and friends.

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