News.com Column Disparages Macworld Expo

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Date: Friday, January 10th, 2003, 01:30
Category: Archive

News.com‘s Enterprise Computing and Personal Technology editor Michael Kanellos shows a remarkable lack of perspective in his “Perspective” column today, entitled “Macintosh: An Acquired Taste”. He calls Keynote “completely impractical”, says the 17″ PowerBook is “not all that different than 16″ screen models from Sony and Toshiba” (even claiming there’s “a nearly identically configured Sony Vaio… for $600 less”), and dismisses the 12″ PowerBook as merely “a mininotebook” that “outside of Japan… few people will buy”. (And of course, he hasn’t even tried these products.) In addition, he repeatedly pokes fun at the MacWorld crowd (claiming an audience member “drunkenly gasped”, etc.), and tells us how “scary” it would be if Apple was “the guiding force in computing” (“we’d be up to our necks in graphic artists, freelance DJs and career temp employees”). But perhaps most bizarrely (and ironically), he ends by lecturing us on why “standards exist in the industry” and how “Microsoft and Intel understand this completely” — but Apple doesn’t. (Safari vs. IE, anyone?) Feel free to politely set this guy straight.


News.com‘s Enterprise Computing and Personal Technology editor Michael Kanellos shows a remarkable lack of perspective in his “Perspective” column today, entitled “Macintosh: An Acquired Taste”. He calls Keynote “completely impractical”, says the 17″ PowerBook is “not all that different than 16″ screen models from Sony and Toshiba” (even claiming there’s “a nearly identically configured Sony Vaio… for $600 less”), and dismisses the 12″ PowerBook as merely “a mininotebook” that “outside of Japan… few people will buy”. (And of course, he hasn’t even tried these products.) In addition, he repeatedly pokes fun at the MacWorld crowd (claiming an audience member “drunkenly gasped”, etc.), and tells us how “scary” it would be if Apple was “the guiding force in computing” (“we’d be up to our necks in graphic artists, freelance DJs and career temp employees”). But perhaps most bizarrely (and ironically), he ends by lecturing us on why “standards exist in the industry” and how “Microsoft and Intel understand this completely” — but Apple doesn’t. (Safari vs. IE, anyone?) Feel free to politely set this guy straight.

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