One Laptop Per Child Project Aims to Begin Production in July

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Date: Wednesday, January 3rd, 2007, 08:00
Category: News

An article on Engadget describes how the One Laptop Per Child project, headed by Nicholas Negroponte and the MIT Media Lab in collaboration with other organizations and vendors with the goal of creating a laptop that can be used by third world nations and purchased by governments, hopes to begin producing several million units around July.
olpclaptop.jpg
The computers, also known as the 2B1 and the XO-1 (previously the “$100 laptop”) will be manufactured by Quanta computer, will be handed over to kids for testing next month. The units include bleeding edge technologies such as improvements in battery conservation, mobile ad hoc networking which can make the most of limited Internet connection resources in a classroom and Flash drives instead of hard drives to be durable and thrive in third world education environments.
The units will function off a Fedora Core Linux operating system and be commercially available after production for about $225, a change from an original plan of only selling the laptops through government agencies.
If you have any comments, feedback or ideas about this, let us know.


An article on Engadget describes how the One Laptop Per Child project, headed by Nicholas Negroponte and the MIT Media Lab in collaboration with other organizations and vendors with the goal of creating a laptop that can be used by third world nations and purchased by governments, hopes to begin producing several million units around July.
olpclaptop.jpg
The computers, also known as the 2B1 and the XO-1 (previously the “$100 laptop”) will be manufactured by Quanta computer, will be handed over to kids for testing next month. The units include bleeding edge technologies such as improvements in battery conservation, mobile ad hoc networking which can make the most of limited Internet connection resources in a classroom and Flash drives instead of hard drives to be durable and thrive in third world education environments.
The units will function off a Fedora Core Linux operating system and be commercially available after production for about $225, a change from an original plan of only selling the laptops through government agencies.
If you have any comments, feedback or ideas about this, let us know.

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