PowerBooks and iBooks in Iraq

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Date: Monday, July 11th, 2005, 19:40
Category: Uncategorized

PowerBooks in IraqIn Back from the Sand: A Mac in Iraq Lawrence I. Charters talks about PowerBooks in Iraq:

In early May a friend in the Pentagon sent me a photo of a Mac sitting on the hood of a Humvee, with a comment that ?Marines use only the best.? A few days later an Apple employee sent me another copy of this picture, plus a second, with a short note that said the photos were taken in Iraq.
I now had a mystery: where did these photos come from? Using clues found in the images as a guide, the photos were eventually traced back to Andrew Cutraro, a photographer with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Along with Post-Dispatch reporter Ron Harris, Cutraro was sent to cover the war in Iraq. ?Embedded,? as the Pentagon phrased it, with Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (part of the First Marine Division), Harris and Cutraro crossed into Iraq from Kuwait, and chronicled the war all the way into Baghdad. Their stories and photos appeared in both the paper and on the paper?s Web site, St. Louis Today.

A related article Evaluating an iBook Under Field Conditions Steven Truax relays his experiences of bringing a brand new iBook to Qatar for a month when he was was activated and deployed in the war on terrorism.

Three days and 7400 nautical miles later I unpacked my footlocker. In my first free moments I began to listen to the music that I had loaded onto iTunes before I had left. The built-in speakers were small and weak, which was not too surprising considering the size limitations of the iBook. These would never do by themselves, but I had brought headphones and under stereo headphones the MP3 music was outstanding. I soon began to make regular trips to our tiny Base Exchange store (BX) to look for more music. After a few weeks I was surprised to realize that I had bought and encoded forty CD?s of music. At first I bought some old CD?s that I had meant to buy for some time but had not gotten around to. After that I bought several contemporary CD?s, ranging from Counting Crows to Garth Brooks, that I would not have gotten around to buying if I had stayed home. Now, I thought with some satisfaction, my wife can no longer tell me that I have never owned a vehicle or CD that had been produced in the current decade. My new iBook and I were off to the races. Let the thunder roll…


PowerBooks in IraqIn Back from the Sand: A Mac in Iraq Lawrence I. Charters talks about PowerBooks in Iraq:

In early May a friend in the Pentagon sent me a photo of a Mac sitting on the hood of a Humvee, with a comment that ?Marines use only the best.? A few days later an Apple employee sent me another copy of this picture, plus a second, with a short note that said the photos were taken in Iraq.
I now had a mystery: where did these photos come from? Using clues found in the images as a guide, the photos were eventually traced back to Andrew Cutraro, a photographer with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Along with Post-Dispatch reporter Ron Harris, Cutraro was sent to cover the war in Iraq. ?Embedded,? as the Pentagon phrased it, with Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (part of the First Marine Division), Harris and Cutraro crossed into Iraq from Kuwait, and chronicled the war all the way into Baghdad. Their stories and photos appeared in both the paper and on the paper?s Web site, St. Louis Today.

A related article Evaluating an iBook Under Field Conditions Steven Truax relays his experiences of bringing a brand new iBook to Qatar for a month when he was was activated and deployed in the war on terrorism.

Three days and 7400 nautical miles later I unpacked my footlocker. In my first free moments I began to listen to the music that I had loaded onto iTunes before I had left. The built-in speakers were small and weak, which was not too surprising considering the size limitations of the iBook. These would never do by themselves, but I had brought headphones and under stereo headphones the MP3 music was outstanding. I soon began to make regular trips to our tiny Base Exchange store (BX) to look for more music. After a few weeks I was surprised to realize that I had bought and encoded forty CD?s of music. At first I bought some old CD?s that I had meant to buy for some time but had not gotten around to. After that I bought several contemporary CD?s, ranging from Counting Crows to Garth Brooks, that I would not have gotten around to buying if I had stayed home. Now, I thought with some satisfaction, my wife can no longer tell me that I have never owned a vehicle or CD that had been produced in the current decade. My new iBook and I were off to the races. Let the thunder roll…

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