Privacy Friday: Microsoft's Lockware Strategy

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Date: Friday, July 29th, 2005, 10:57
Category: Archive

Recent headlines blare that Microsoft has forged a new “alliance” with Hollywood, but what does that mean for people who use or create software and hardware that works with Microsoft products?
Seth Schoen, EFF’s staff technologist and resident expert on “trusted computing,” attended this year’s Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) to find out. In a four-part series of updates on Microsoft’s security and lockware strategy for Windows, Schoen explores the implications of the latest developments on your ability to control your own computer, create or use interoperable products, exercise your fair-use rights, protect your privacy, and maintain computer security. (Source: EFF)
Read More:
Part 1: “Microsoft Trusted Computing Updates
Part 2: “The Dangers of Device Authentication
Part 3: “Protected Media Path, Component Revocation, Windows Driver Lockdown
Part 4: “Microsoft Sells Out the Public on CGMS-A


Recent headlines blare that Microsoft has forged a new “alliance” with Hollywood, but what does that mean for people who use or create software and hardware that works with Microsoft products?
Seth Schoen, EFF’s staff technologist and resident expert on “trusted computing,” attended this year’s Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) to find out. In a four-part series of updates on Microsoft’s security and lockware strategy for Windows, Schoen explores the implications of the latest developments on your ability to control your own computer, create or use interoperable products, exercise your fair-use rights, protect your privacy, and maintain computer security. (Source: EFF)
Read More:
Part 1: “Microsoft Trusted Computing Updates
Part 2: “The Dangers of Device Authentication
Part 3: “Protected Media Path, Component Revocation, Windows Driver Lockdown
Part 4: “Microsoft Sells Out the Public on CGMS-A

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