Q&A: Speck Products SeeThru MBP Hard Shell

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Date: Monday, October 23rd, 2006, 08:00
Category: Accessory

speck-seethru-mbp-clr.jpgAfter I posted a note about the new See•Thru hard shell for the MacBook Pro on my ZDNet blog I received some questions about its thermal characteristics. Specifically you wanted to know how it affects the MacBook Pro’s overall thermal signature?
I posed the question directly to Speck products, who answered:

The SeeThru hard shell was engineered with a 74-slot ventilation system to facilitate the MacBook Pro’s internal cooling process. The shell is designed to allow for thermal exchange out of the heatsinks and fans of the computer. The hard shell should in no way affect the performance of the MacBook or MacBook Pro.

I have to concur that after using a See•Thru hard shell over the weekend my MacBook Pro (2GHz) temps weren’t any higher than the 160°F (highs) that I normally observe.
On a side note, I am getting extremely used to using smcFanControl to keep my MBP well under 160°F – usually 40-50°F less. Apple needs to add this type of user fan control to the OS by the time Mac OS 10.5 Leopard is released. Temperature figures as reported by CoreDuoTemp.


speck-seethru-mbp-clr.jpgAfter I posted a note about the new See•Thru hard shell for the MacBook Pro on my ZDNet blog I received some questions about its thermal characteristics. Specifically you wanted to know how it affects the MacBook Pro’s overall thermal signature?
I posed the question directly to Speck products, who answered:

The SeeThru hard shell was engineered with a 74-slot ventilation system to facilitate the MacBook Pro’s internal cooling process. The shell is designed to allow for thermal exchange out of the heatsinks and fans of the computer. The hard shell should in no way affect the performance of the MacBook or MacBook Pro.

I have to concur that after using a See•Thru hard shell over the weekend my MacBook Pro (2GHz) temps weren’t any higher than the 160°F (highs) that I normally observe.
On a side note, I am getting extremely used to using smcFanControl to keep my MBP well under 160°F – usually 40-50°F less. Apple needs to add this type of user fan control to the OS by the time Mac OS 10.5 Leopard is released. Temperature figures as reported by CoreDuoTemp.

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