Adobe releases Lightroom 4.2 update

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012, 07:32
Category: News, Software

It’s hard to argue with a useful update.

On Wednesday, Adobe released 4.2 of its Lightroom image editing program. The new version, a 426 megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:

- Album Support within the Revel Publish Service.

- Additional camera support for 20 new cameras including the Canon EOS 650D / Rebel T4i, Fujifilm X-E1, and Sony DSC-RX100.

- Corrections for issues introduced in previous versions of Lightroom.

Adobe Lightroom 4.2 retails for US$149.00 and requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6.8 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Adobe releases Photoshop Elements 11

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, September 25th, 2012, 10:01
Category: News, Software

The headline sort of says it all.

On Tuesday, graphics giant Adobe announced the released of its Photoshop Elements 11 consumer image editing suite, the new version, a 1.99 gigabyte download with a 30 day demo available, adds the following features and changes:

- Quickly turn photos into stunning illustrations: Get the wow without the work by simply clicking to apply new Comic, Graphic Novel, and Pen & Ink filters.

- Discover a friendly and intuitive environment:Organize, edit, create, and share more quickly and easily thanks to big, bold icons; a helpful Action bar; and the ability to choose from Quick, Guided, and Expert editing modes to fit your needs.

- Manage your photos more easily: Intuitively sort and manage photos and video clips based on people, places, and events using new Organizer views.

- Easily create pro-quality photographic effects: Use new Guided Edits for step-by-step help creating tilt-shift effects that make photos look like miniature scenes, vignettes that draw attention to the center of your photos, and high- and low-key effects that add energy or drama with high levels of white or black.

- Combine elements from different photos with ease: Cleanly extract something from one photo to put in another. Industry-leading Adobe Photoshop picture editing technology makes it easy to select and refine the edges of hair and other tricky content, so you can add relatives to the family portrait, put a friend onstage with her favorite singer, and more.

- Map your memories: Relive your journeys by viewing your photos and videos on a map based on where they were taken.

- Share videos on Vimeo: Quickly share your video clips and movies on the popular Vimeo site.

- New templates: Impress friends and family by sharing photos in eye-catching new templates for printed photo keepsakes and Online Albums.

- Take your photo editing to the next level: Expand your editing options by quickly importing and applying effects and styles from popular photo sites and blogs. Even import actions that automate repetitive editing tasks.

Adobe Photoshop Elements 11 retails for US$99.99 for the full version and US$79.99 for the upgrade version and requires Mac OS X 10.6 and an Intel multi-core processor to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new Photoshop Elements and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments or feedback.

Adobe releases Lightroom 4.2 public beta

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, August 28th, 2012, 12:12
Category: News, Software

You can’t knock additional camera suport on a powerful image editing program.

On Tuesday, Adobe released a public beta of version 4.2 of its Lightroom image editing program. The new version, a 392 megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:

New Cameras:
- Canon EOS 650D / Rebel T4i
- Canon EOS M
- Fuji FinePix F800EXR
- Leaf Credo 40
- Leaf Credo 60
- Nikon 1 J2
- Panasonic DMC-FZ200
- Panasonic DMC-G5
- Panasonic DMC-LX7
- Pentax K-30
- Sony DSC-RX100

New Lens Profile Support:
- Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM
- Canon EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM
- Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM
- Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
- Sigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM
- Zeiss Distagon T* 1,4/35 ZE
- Zeiss Distagon T* 2/25 ZE
- LEICA APO ELMAR-S 180 mm f/3.5 (CS)
- LEICA APO MACRO SUMMARIT-S 120 mm f/2.5 (CS)
- LEICA APO-SUMMICRON-M 50 mm f/2 ASPH.
- LEICA ELMARIT-S 30 mm f/2.8 ASPH. (CS)
- LEICA SUMMARIT-S 35 mm f/2.5 ASPH. (CS)
- LEICA SUMMARIT-S 70 mm f/2.5 ASPH. (CS)
- LEICA SUPER-ELMAR-S 24 mm f/3.5 ASPH
- LEICA VARIO-ELMAR-S 30-90 mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH.
- Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR
- Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR xcSigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM xcTamron SP 24– 70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD A007N
- Zeiss Distagon T* 1,4/35 ZF.2
- Zeiss Distagon T* 2/25 ZF.2
- Pentax smc D FA 645 25mm F4 AL (IF) SDM AW
- Pentax smc DA 40mm F2.8 XS
- Pentax smc DA 50mm F1.8
- Pentax smc DA 645 25mm F4 AL (IF) SDM AW
- Sigma 18-50mm F2.8-4.5 DC HSM
- Sigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM
- Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro
- Sigma 18-50mm F2.8-4.5 DC HSM

Fixed:
- Folder stacks with virtual copies get unstacked when moving to another folder.

- Stacked photos get hidden in both the Grid view and Filmstrip. This occurs when photos get unstacked as a result of enabling auto-stacking.

- Errors encountered when publishing videos to Facebook through the Facebook Publish Service.

- Users may have occurred problems when trying to enter the Web Module from Library.

- Unable to edit JPEG photos in Photoshop Elements.

- Background graphics that are applied to a Book globally may not appear as expected in a Saved PDF.

- Certain book covers had spine text positioned in a Horizontal manner, not Vertical.

- Double byte characters are not being exported to PDF in Books.

- Photos were exported with original GPS coordinates recorded by the camera, not with the GPS coordinates updated in Lightroom.

- Keyboard shortcuts in the Develop module sometimes do not work when editing an image in Process Version PV2010.

- Parents and synonyms of “do not export” keywords also do not export.

Adobe Lightroom 4.2 retails for US$149.00 and requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6.8 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Mozilla to discontinue support for Firefox under Leopard this October

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012, 09:22
Category: News, Software

elfirefox

Ya gotta upgrade sometime.

Per Macworld, Mozilla will drop support for Apple’s OS X 10.5, or Leopard, after it ships Firefox 16 in October, according to company developers.

“We are not planning to support Mac OS X 10.5 with Firefox 17,” said Josh Aas, who works on the Firefox platform group, in a message last month on Bugzilla. “The builds will fail to run on anything less than Mac OS X 10.6.”

OS X 10.6 is Snow Leopard, the 2009 follow-up to Leopard, which shipped in October 2007.

By Mozilla’s release calendar, Firefox 16 is to debut Oct. 9. Firefox 17, the first that will not to pushed to Leopard users, is slated for a Nov. 20 launch.

Mozilla is following Google’s lead in dropping Leopard; Google released its last browser for OS X 10.5, Chrome 21, on July 31.

Although Mozilla talked about ditching OS X 10.5 support in December 2011, it decided then to keep Apple’s OS on the list. Discussions among engineers, managers and contributors restarted in late June.

According to Mozilla, Leopard’s importance is diminishing. “Mac OS X 10.5 users have been declining by 1% per month, as a share of our total Mac OS X users,” said Aas. “This, combined with the impact of the release of Mac OS X 10.8 [Mountain Lion], means that Mac OS X 10.5 users will likely make up around 10% of Mac OS X users when Firefox 17 ships.”

As of June 21, 17% of Firefox 13’s Mac users were running Leopard, with larger shares on Snow Leopard (35%) and Lion (48%), Aas said. Only 4.6% of all Firefox 13 users were running it on a Mac.

Like Google, another reason Mozilla cited for dumping Leopard was that Apple has also ended support.

The last time Apple patched bugs in Leopard was November 2011, and its most recent security update, in May 2012, disabled older copies of Flash Player to stymie Flashback rather than fix specific security flaws. Nor has Apple maintained Safari on OS X 10.5. The final update was issued over a year ago.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Adobe releases Flash Player 11.4.402.265 update

Posted by:
Date: Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012, 06:06
Category: News, Software

adobelogo

Late Wednesday, Adobe released Flash Player 11.4.402.265 for Mac OS X, a 11.9 megabyte download via MacUpdate. The new version adds the following fixes and changes:

Fixed Issues:
- Netstream crashes intermittently on disconnect(3193417).

- Mouse Lock feature disabled after entering Full Screen Interactive mode(3174344).

- First frame of some live streaming contents freezes(3207896).

- Issue with CameraRoll.browseForImage() causes transparency loss resulting in white color(3291312) To the top.

New Features:
- ActionScript Workers.

- Sandbox Bridge support.

- Licensing support: Flash Player Premium Features for Gaming.

- Stage3D “constrained” profile for increased GPU reach.

- LZMA support for ByteArray.

- StageVideo attachCamera/Camera improvements.

- Compressed texture with alpha support for Stage3D.

Flash Player 11.4.402.265 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback, please feel free to hurl your two cents in via the comments.

Adobe releases Flash Player 11.3.300.271 update

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, August 14th, 2012, 15:39
Category: News, security, Software

adobelogo

Late Wednesday, Adobe released Flash Player 11.3.300.271 for Mac OS X, a 11.6 megabyte download via MacUpdate. The new version adds a slew of security fixes outlined here.

Flash Player 11.3.300.271 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback, please feel free to hurl your two cents in via the comments.

Adobe Reader, Adobe Acrobat Pro updated to 10.1.4

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, August 14th, 2012, 14:20
Category: News, Software

On Tuesday, Adobe released version 10.1.4 of its Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat Pro applications. The updates, which can also be snagged through the Adobe Update Utility, adds the following fixes and changes:

- This is a regular quarterly update that provides security mitigations, feature enhancements, and bug fixes.

- Added support for Mac OS X 10.8.

- Safari 5.1 for 10.6.8-10.7, Safari 6.0 for 10.8.

Acrobat Reader 10.1.4 and Acrobat Pro requires an Intel-based processor and Mac OS X 10.5.8 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new versions and noticed any differences, please let us know what you think.

Apple releases iOS 6 beta 4, removes YouTube app in newest developer version

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, August 7th, 2012, 06:30
Category: iOS, iPhone, News, Software

Apple on Monday afternoon released the 4th beta of iOS 6 to developers and in the process appears to have nixed the inclusion of the once-standard YouTube app in what appears to be an escalation of tensions between the company and rival Google.

Per AppleInsider, upon installing the release, sources familiar with the software confirm that the Apple-developed YouTube app is no longer part of the distribution — potentially a sign of increased tensions between the two companies which are facing off against each other in both the mobile and connected television segments.

Google owns YouTube.

Update: in a statement issued yesterday, Apple offered the following:

“Our license to include the YouTube app in iOS has ended, customers can use YouTube in the Safari browser and Google is working on a new YouTube app to be on the App Store.”

At the release of the original iPhone in 2007, Apple partnered with Google to develop a native, bundled YouTube app for the iPhone that would allow users to access Google’s vast library of user-created videos.

Without work on Google’s side to make those videos available using the open H.264 codec, its YouTube videos would not have worked with the iPhone because Google’s player and distribution formats were tied to Adobe Flash, a software platform that wasn’t functional on smartphones and wouldn’t be made available by Adobe in a partially-usable form until 2010, and then only on brand new hardware powerful enough to run it.

Because of the proprietary nature of Flash, Apple would have been severely constrained in any of its efforts to create an in-house compatibility layer to support it. It would also have required significant resources and introduced new limitations on Apple’s iOS.

Rather than taking on the nearly impossible task of supporting Flash on 2007-era mobile devices, Apple decided to instead provide alternative workarounds that minimized the feature loss of not having Flash available.

Because the primary valuable uses of Flash revolved around simple web site animations and video playback, Apple focused on providing rich support for advanced HTML techniques and began promoting Flash-free, direct H.264 video playback, two features that became prominent capabilities of HTML 5.

After initially supporting YouTube playback on the iPhone, Apple TV and later the iPad by converting its huge library to enable raw H.264 video downloads, Google began an attack on the H.264 standard because it incorporated licensed technologies that put it at odds with free software advocates in the open source community, particularly Mozilla.

Google acquired its own proprietary codec (renaming it WebM) and made the specification “open” in the sense of requiring no licensing fees to use it. However, the MPEG Licensing Authority, the standards body behind H.264, insisted that Google’s new specification infringed upon the technical patent portfolio already developed by the global community for H.264.

Concerns around the legal legitimacy and infringement risks of Google’s own WebM codec, as well as the codec’s serious technical shortcomings (including a lack of mobile hardware acceleration support) has caused it to fail to gain any serious traction in the market since, even despite Google’s removal of H.264 playback support from its Chrome web browser.

Over the last five years, Apple’s support for HTML 5 and H.264 video has made both open standards (one freely licensed, the other requiring licensing from the MPEG LA) the new foundations of web development. This is particularly the case in the global market for mobile devices, about half of which are now produced by Apple.

Adobe has canceled Flash development on mobile devices, and its middleware platform is now becoming increasingly irrelevant on the web as HTML 5 takes over more and more features formerly served by Flash. After YouTube’s switch to serving H.264, other prominent video distributors followed suit, to the point where most of the world’s web videos do not require Flash to work, an unbelievable scenario back in 2007.

At this point, iOS doesn’t need a special app to access YouTube videos, and as Apple indicated in its comment to the media, Google has terminated its license to access YouTube videos natively, rather than via Google’s website.

While Apple no longer needs to direct attention to YouTube videos in a special iOS app, the removal of its YouTube app sends a strong message when combined with other, related efforts Apple has made to exclude Google from its once intimate position on Apple’s iOS platform.

New “Share Sheets” Apple introduced for iOS 6 and this summer’s OS X Mountain Lion specifically support Google’s YouTube competitor site Vimeo, but not YouTube.

Apple has also added support for Yahoo’s Flickr photo site but not Google’s Picassa, and has added or announced new social link features for Twitter and Facebook, but conspicuously not Google’s own competing services Buzz and Google+.

One of the most significant features of iOS 6 is Apple’s new Maps, which erases its former support for Google’s mapping services and establishes Apple’s own in-house services in their place.

Apple’s new Maps app for iOS 6 (below) similarly avoids any support for Google’s Places, instead partnering with Yelp, and makes no effort to incorporate Google’s Latitude location sharing, having introduced Apple’s own device location and Find My Friends services tied to iCloud.

Apple’s removal or lack of support for Google’s services (particularly given the support of its competitor’s) is apparently an intentional distancing effort Apple has initiated as a response to Google’s increasingly intense competitive efforts, which include Google’s Android software platform, legal efforts to challenge Apple’s infringement complaints with offensive use of standards essential patents through Google’s new Motorola subsidiary, and most recently, efforts to take on the iPad and Apple TV with Google-branded hardware devices.

Stay tuned for additional details and if you’ve gotten your mitts on the new iOS 6 beta, please let us know what you make of it in the comments.

Adobe releases Flash Player 11.3.300.268 update

Posted by:
Date: Friday, July 27th, 2012, 07:30
Category: News, Software

adobelogo

Late Wednesday, Adobe released Flash Player 11.3.300.268 for Mac OS X, a 10.9 megabyte download via MacUpdate. The new beta version includes the following fixes and changes:

- Various general stability issues.

Flash Player 11.3.300.268 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback, please feel free to hurl your two cents in via the comments.

Adobe releases InDesign fix to alleviate crash on Ivy Bridge-equipped MacBooks

Posted by:
Date: Tuesday, July 17th, 2012, 06:19
Category: MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, News, Software

It never hurts to issue a bug fix.

Per AppleInsider, Adobe on Monday issued a ZIP file complete with instructions to manually fix an API bug that would crash the company’s InDesign professional layout software on Intel Ivy Bridge-equipped MacBooks.

The fix comes less than a week after Adobe acknowledged a problem with its program and Apple’s OS X 10.7.4 which comes pre-installed on all 2012 MacBook Pros and MacBook Airs. According to a user support forum thread started in mid-June, the issue can be traced back to an API that handled InDesign’s system icons which was removed in the latest update to OS X.

The problem caused blank dialogue boxes to pop up as InDesign failed to retrieve the correct icon assets which in turn crashed the program.

It appears that the issue is confined to mid-2012 MacBooks that have “MacBook Pro (Mid 2012) Software Update” installed. Previous to Monday’s response some users created a workaround by rolling back the machine’s operating system to factory defaults.

Adobe is working closely with Apple on both their current and future OS releases to resolve this issue in a more comprehensive manner.

Adobe’s pseudo-patch involves the running of a script that installs three InDesign icons automatically or, for cases where the script does not run, a manual installation of the files directly into the application’s resources folder.

If you’ve tried the patch and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.