Analyst cites iPad 2 components, specs, expected supply numbers

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Date: Monday, January 31st, 2011, 05:25
Category: iPad, Rumor

Per AppleInsider, analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of Concord Securities has prepared a report indicating that iPad 2 won’t receive higher resolution screen this year, using the same 1024×768 of the original iPad.

“The improvement of iPad 2 display,” the report notes, “focuses on thickness and anti-reflection, not resolution. iPad 2 display module is 30 – 35% thinner than iPad 1 and it’s helpful for better form factor.

“Thanks to anti-reflection, iPad 2 could have better sunlight readable experience and it’s helpful for Apple to compete with Amazon’s fast growing Kindle business.

“The most important reason why iPad 2 won’t have retinal display is yield rate of panel making. At this point, making high resolution and bright IPS/FFS panel is not easy and the production volume and cost couldn’t meet Apple’s requirements.”

The new iPad model is also said to pack much higher processing power, graphics and more RAM and faster memory access. The greater computing power of of the revised iPad “could ensure iPad 2‘s competitive advantage for coming tablet war this year,” the report notes.

“iPad 2 will use [ARM] Cortex-A9 dual core processor running at 1.2GHz. Increasing 1-2% single core processor clock results in a 3-5% power increase and dual core could get a better balance between computing power and power consumption. That’s the reason why Apple will use dual core for iPad 2.”

As expected, the report also states “iPad 2 will also have a GPU using Imagination’s SGX543 dual core graphics technology which is 200~300% powerful than iPhone 4.”

RAM is also on the rise, the report says. “For making full use of GPU upgrading advantage, iPad 2 needs bigger memory bandwidth. So iPad 2 has 512MB RAM, same as iPhone 4 and twice as much as iPad 1, but running at higher clock 1,066 MHz for getting bigger memory bandwidth (iPhone 4 memory clock is 800 MHz).”

The report also stated that “iPad 2 adds one new CDMA model and it could bring more market share to Apple. Project IDs of Wi-Fi, GSM and CDMA iPad 2 models are different. GSM iPad will use Infineon chip and CDMA iPad will use Qualcomm chip. More suppliers could reduce the risk of component shortage.”

The possibility of an SD Card slot is mentioned, but not confirmed, but the report notes that the iPad 2 will have two cameras, but with components shared with iPad touch, rather than the higher quality iPhone 4 cameras.

“There are more and more photo and video editing applications for iPad in App Store. The SD slot could let users easily transfer photo and video files made by DSC and DV to iPad and edit them,” the report observed, falling short of actually confirming whether a card slot will be present.

“iPad has two cameras. Front camera is 0.3 mega-pixel [VGA, like iPhone 4] and rear one is 1 mega-pixel [like iPod touch, rather than iPhone 4]. Front camera is for Facetime and Photo Booth and 0.3 mega-pixel is enough because the resolution of iPad 2 is 1,024×768. Rear camera is for applications such as video recording and augmented reality.”

Finally, the report notes that Foxconn will remain the iPad’s sole maker, noting that production began this month and will result in “at least 4.5 – 5 million units for Apple in 1Q’11. iPad 2 will likely go to market in late 1Q’11 or early 2Q’11 based on supply chain shipment status.”

Delicious Library Updated to 2.6.3

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Date: Tuesday, January 25th, 2011, 05:24
Category: News, Software

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On Wednesday, software company Delicious Monster released version 2.6.3 of the shareware favorite, Delicious Library. Delicious Monster allows Macs with webcams to scan the bar codes of any book, movie, music CD or video game, then creates an archive based on background information from the Internet. Additional features help keep the library organized and reseller’s tools allow for items to be quickly posted for sale online.

The update, a 17.3 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

- Removed strange ☛ and ☞ characters that suddenly appeared in our final localizations due to recent changes in our build system. These are still in this beta, but will be removed in the final.

- Fixed some minor coding errors I made a long time ago around multi-threading that could, in rare cases, cause crashes.

- Fixed some broken links in Help files.

- Changed the app name in the main menu to “Delicious Library” to comply with the Mac App Store (but now we aren’t in compliance with the Apple Human Interface Guidelines).

- Folded in various other changes made for the Mac App Store that shouldn’t change visible functionality but still need testing.

Full release notes can be found here and Delicious Library 2.6.3 retails for US$40 and requires Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run.

Apple seeds first Mac OS X 10.6.7 beta to developer community

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Date: Friday, January 21st, 2011, 05:25
Category: News, Software

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Late Thursday Apple issued the first beta of Mac OS X 10.6.7, the next security and maintenance update for its Snow Leopard operating system, to its developers community for testing.

Per AppleInsider, the first beta is dubbed Build 10J842 is a 338.6MB download in its delta form. People familiar with the first beta said that its documentation notes there are no known issues with the software.

Developers have reportedly been asked to focus on AirPort, Bonjour, SMB file sharing, and graphics drivers.

The first beta arrived just weeks after Apple released Mac OS X 10.6.6 for Snow Leopard. That update brought the Mac App Store, a new digital download destination to obtain software for the Mac platform.

While it is unknown what new features or fixes might come in Mac OS X 10.6.7, the Mac App Store will likely prove to be the last major feature added to Snow Leopard. Apple has already begun to hype Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, its next major operating system release. Lion will bring features from iOS, including a home screen, full-screen applications and new multi-touch gestures, to the Mac platform when it debuts this summer.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases Mac OS X 10.6.6, adds App Store support

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Date: Thursday, January 6th, 2011, 11:28
Category: News, Software

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Somewhat surprisingly, Apple released version 10.6.6 of its Mac OS X operating system today. The new version, which ranges from 160 megabytes to 1.06 gigabytes should you download the combo updater, adds the following fixes and changes according to Macworld:

- App Store integration and support.

- Fix for a cropping problem with some PostScript printing in landscape mode.

- Fix for an issue with ATI graphics card-powered Macs where connecting an external DVI display could yield erratic mouse pointer movement.

- Fix for a single security vulnerability related to the PackageKit system, preventing a man-in-the-middle attack that could force the app to quit or potentially execute arbitrary code.

The update requires Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run and can, as usual, be snagged via Mac OS X’s Software Update feature.

Mac OS X 10.6.6 update to include beginnings of Mac App Store integration

Posted by:
Date: Friday, December 24th, 2010, 11:03
Category: News, Software

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This could be interesting.

Per MacGeneration, Apple plans to include some rudimentary integration between its upcoming Mac App Store and the next maintenance release of Mac OS X 10.6, according to discoveries made a MacGeneration forum member.

Mac OS X 10.6.6, due for release in the next few weeks, will offer users the option of searching the Mac App Store for applications when it runs into an unsupported file type for which no application has previously been assigned.

The Mac App Store — due to launch on January 6th — would return applications capable of opening the specific file.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available and if you have any thoughts about the Mac App Store, please let us know.

Apple, magazine publishers in long-standing stalemate over iPad-based subscriptions

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Date: Monday, December 6th, 2010, 06:06
Category: iPad, News

In as much as the iPad has been seen as the device to help bring magazines back into a better range of profitability, the devil may be in the details. Per MediaMemo, Apple and magazine publishers have still not been able to reach a deal for selling subscriptions on the iPad, as publications reportedly want extensive subscriber data, but Apple is unwilling to give it.

The report stated Friday that Apple and publishers are “still miles apart” on the prospect of subscriptions for iPad content in the App Store. The two sides remain at odds over the same issue they’ve allegedly been debating since early this year: Publishers want personal data about subscribers to provide to advertisers, and Apple doesn’t want to allow it.

Apple is reportedly offering publishers the option of an opt-in form, which would allow subscribers to grant publications the ability to access a “limited amount of information” about them, such as their name, physical mailing address, and e-mail address.

They’ve also proposed the same revenue sharing plans used to great success on the App Store, where Apple keeps a 30% cut of all transactions.

“The offer has been on the table for a ‘couple months,’ I’m told, and so far none of the big publishers have gone for it,” Kafka wrote. “They don’t like the 30% cut Apple wants to take, but their real hang-up is the lack of access to credit card data: It’s valuable to them for marketing, and without it they can’t offer print/digital bundles, either.”

As a result, he said publishers are now looking toward Google and tablets running the Android mobile operating system, in hopes of finding some success on that platform instead.

However, the anticipated tablet-only daily publication from News Corp, called The Daily, doesn’t have many of the same issues, because it’s a new product that’s doesn’t have existing customers on the print side of the business. One rumor has suggested that The Daily will be formally announced, along with Apple’s subscription plans, at an event on Dec. 9 or soon after.

For months, reports have claimed that Apple is unwilling to share consumer data beyond sales volume to publishers who are interested in putting their publications on the App Store. It has been said that Apple has pitched an opt-in function that would allow consumers to willingly share some information, but according to Kafka’s sources, Apple still refuses to give more detailed demographic information.

Print publishers view demographic data from readers as their most valuable asset, as they rely on that information to sell advertisements.

Apple finally accepts official Google Voice app for App Store

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Date: Wednesday, November 17th, 2010, 05:57
Category: iPhone, News, Software

Apple finally accepted the official Google Voice application into the App Store on Tuesday, bringing to the iPhone an application that was previously rejected and resulted in an inquiry from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.

Per the Google Voice Blog, the Google Voice App is a free download available in the App Store, and works for any users of the Google Voice telephony service. Features of the application advertised by Google include:

- Cheap rates for international calls

- Free text messaging to U.S. numbers

- Voicemail transcription

- Display your Google Voice number as caller ID when making calls

The software also offers a number of features that can only be accomplished with a native iPhone application. Previously, Google had offered a mobile Voice service through a website.

The native app will alert users when they receive a new voicemail or text message with push notifications. In addition, most calls will be placed via Direct Access Numbers, making them connect just as quickly as regular phone calls.

Google Voice for iPhone requires iOS 3.1 or later and a valid Google Voice account to use the App. It is currently available in the U.S. only.

Reports that Apple would change its stance on the Google Voice application first surfaced in September, after Apple revised and published its own App Store Review Guidelines. Applications that accessed the Google Voice service were pulled in 2009, after Google submitted its own official application.

Apple refused to accept the official Google Voice app into the App Store, which prompted an investigation from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. Apple told the FCC that it was reviewing the software, but contended it did not outright reject it.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple previews Mac OS X 10.7 “Lion” at media event

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Date: Thursday, October 21st, 2010, 01:53
Category: News, Software

In the midst of Apple’s product announcements yesterday, the company previewed its next-generation operating system, Mac OS X 10.7, dubbed “Lion”.

Per AppleInsider, the update will bring iOS features to the Mac platform, including multi-touch gestures, the App Store and Home screens, and will arrive in the summer of 2011.


Features of Mac OS X 10.7 “Lion” highlighted by Jobs Wednesday include:
- Multi-touch gestures

- App Store

- App Home screens

- Full screen apps

- Auto save

- Apps resume when launched

The preview highlighted just a few of Lion’s features, including the Mac App Store, a new way to discover, install and automatically update desktop apps; Launchpad, a new home for all of your Mac apps; system-wide support for full screen apps; and Mission Control, which unifies Exposé, Dashboard, Spaces and full screen apps into an innovative new view of everything running on your Mac, and allows you to instantly navigate anywhere.

“Lion brings many of the best ideas from iPad back to the Mac, plus some fresh new ones like Mission Control that Mac users will really like,” Jobs said in a press release. “Lion has a ton of new features, and we hope the few we had time to preview today will give users a good idea of where we are headed.”

Multi-Touch:
Jobs said that touchscreens don’t work when in front of a user, which is why devices like the iPhone and iPad are successful. Given that, Jobs said Macs will stick with products like the trackpad and Magic Mouse for input.

“This is how we’re going to use multi-touch on our Mac products,” he said.

Mac App Store:
Lion will bring the Mac App Store, which, like on iOS, will include one-click downloads, free and paid downloads, and revenue sharing with developers. The Mac App Store will also include automatic updates, and software will be licensed for use on all personal Macs.

Apple said the Mac App Store brings the App Store experience to OS X, making discovering, installing and updating Mac apps easier than ever. Like on iPad, you purchase apps using your iTunes account and they download and install in just one step. App updates are delivered directly through the Mac App Store, so it’s easy to keep all of your apps up to date. The Mac App Store will be available for Snow Leopard within 90 days and will be included in Lion when it ships next summer.

A demo showing off the Mac App Store showed off the ability to purchase and install Pages with just one click. Applications can also be added to the Launch Pad, which can be selected from the Mac OS X Dock and brings an iPad-style grid of icons and pages onto the screen as an overlay.

Mission Control:
Jobs also announced a new feature, Mission Control, which allows users to view anything running on a Mac and instantly navigate to anywhere. He said this will combine existing features, like Expose, with new ones like full screen.

Apple said that Mission Control presents you with a unified view of every app and window running on your Mac, so you can instantly navigate anywhere. Mission Control also incorporates the next generation of Exposé, presenting all the windows running on your Mac grouped by application, alongside thumbnails of full screen apps, Dashboard and other Spaces.

Mission Control clusters alike apps, making them easy to select when in Mission Control.

LaunchPad:
Similar to the Home screen on iPad, you can see all the apps on your Mac elegantly displayed just by clicking the Launchpad icon in the dock. Apps can be organized in any order or grouped into folders, and you can swipe through multiple pages of apps to find the one you want.

Lion includes system-wide support for full screen applications. With Lion, you can enter full screen mode with just one click, switch from one full screen app to another with just a swipe of the trackpad, and swipe back to the desktop to access your multi-window applications.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple patent shows efforts towards expanded cloud-based syncing

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Date: Friday, October 1st, 2010, 02:40
Category: News, Patents

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A new Apple patent published this week, entitled “Configurable Offline Data Store”, shows that future mobile devices from Apple could sync and save large amounts of data over the Internet, allowing future access to information when an Internet connection is no longer available and removing the need to tether to a PC.

The invention, filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on June 14th, 2010, would synchronize data for offline use when an Internet connection is not available.

Per AppleInsider, the patent describes a system that would allow users to access content from a remote computer or server, but also save that information locally for use when an Internet connection is not available. The application also notes that users may want to disable their Internet because constant syncing and updating may result in poor performance.

It describes individual applications that would be able to access this cloud-stored data, dubbed “savvy applications.” These are distinguished from “non-savvy applications,” which would not have access to the remote data.

The smart syncing system would predetermine which data might be “reasonably requested” when the two machines are reconnected, having it queued an ready to go immediately. The system would also allow for other “requested records,” which would occur when changes are made to lesser-used files.

Current mobile devices from Apple like the iPhone have a number of options for users to sync basic data, such as iPhone contacts, with Internet-based services. But the company is also said to be interested in offering a cloud-based streaming service for purchased iTunes content, like music and movies.

The technology described within the patent application would allow such data to be stored locally, and synced from anywhere with an Internet connection, rather than on a local network or via a USB cable.

Such a feature could also be used with Apple’s App Store, where software downloads greater than 20MB in size are not allowed over cellular data networks. When on a 3G network, the client-side machine (an iPhone or iPad) could save an intended download for later, when it can be obtained over a Wi-Fi network.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Official Google Voice app approved, should arrive in App Store in a few weeks

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Date: Tuesday, September 28th, 2010, 04:34
Category: iPhone, News, Software

The official Google Voice application for iPhone has finally been granted acceptance into the App Store by Apple.

Per TechCrunch, a source stated that the application will be released in the next few weeks. Apple reportedly accepted the application submitted in mid-2009, though Google plans to update it to support the iPhone 4 and multitasking capabilities in iOS 4.

Last week, applications that access the Google Voice service began appearing in the App Store, after being banished for more than a year. The first two that became available were GV Mobile + and GV Connect.

The opportunity for Google Voice applications to return to the App Store came after Apple revised and published its own App Store Review Guidelines, giving developers an idea of what kind of software will or will not be allowed for iOS devices.

Google Voice applications were previously available in the App Store, but were pulled in July of 2009 after Google submitted its official application. Apple refused to accept the official Google Voice app into the App Store, which prompted an investigation from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.

In a letter to the FCC, Apple claimed it was reviewing the Google Voice application, but had not outright rejected it. Google, on the other hand, said the software was rejected. Over a year passed, however, with no word on its official acceptance or rejection.

Instead, Google opted to release a Web-based application for Google Voice, which allows users to access the service from the Mobile Safari browser on the iPhone. Unlike the App Store, where Apple controls what content is available, basic Web content is not filtered or restricted.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.