Leaked iPhone 5C footage shows informal scratch test, possible use of LiquidMetal fabrication process

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Date: Thursday, August 22nd, 2013, 09:04
Category: Hardware, iPhone, News

Ok, this could lead to some really interesting stuff.

Per Apple Daily and the Apple Core, leaked video of what is purported to be an assembled iPhone 5C, the low-cost iPhone rumored to be announced on September 10, has surfaced. The footage shows the unit surviving an informal pocket test with no visible scratches on its rear plastic shell. In it, an anonymous individual puts the 5C into a gallon Ziploc bag with coins, keys, screws, paper clips and, what appears to be a pocket flashlight, then closes and shakes the bag vigorously.



Head on over to the Apple Core for Jason’s full analysis of what’s happening with the next-gen iPhone, additional details and delicious cake.

Note: There will not actually be cake. This was a lie.

Apple seeds Mavericks Developer Preview 6 to programmer community, include minor fixes

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Date: Thursday, August 22nd, 2013, 07:41
Category: News, Software

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Mavericks is still en route, folks.

Per MacNN, on Wednesday, Apple seeded the sixth Developer Preview of the next major upgrade of OS X, known as “Mavericks” (10.9) to developers. Apple appears to be back on its normal development cycle following the disruption of the Developer Center due to a security intrusion in July. The latest update comes two weeks after the fifth DP, which introduced iBooks for the Mac to the upgrade. Registered developers can download the software from the Mac App Store or Software Update. The final version is expected to arrive in September.

The update arrives with no significant reported enhancements, just bug fixes and minor tweaks. The final version will include new additions such as Finder Tabs, Apple Maps for OS X, and a number of processor-management enhancements that should further extend battery life for portable users, among other features.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Apple releases iBooks 3.1.1 update

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Date: Wednesday, August 21st, 2013, 09:58
Category: iOS, News, Software

You can’t kvetch about this kind of update.

Late Tuesday, Apple released version 3.1.1 of its iBooks update for its iOS reader program.

The new version, a 41 megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:

– This version of iBooks improves compatibility with iOS and iCloud.

iBooks 3.1.1 requires a compatible iOS device and iOS 5.0 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Rumor: Apple to release next-gen iPhone in Japanese marketplace on September 20th

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Date: Wednesday, August 21st, 2013, 07:16
Category: iPhone, retail, Rumor

Today’s rumor mill is focused on the land of the rising sun and when it’ll receive the next-gen iPhone handsets.

Per CNET, Apple is set to release both a next-generation “iPhone 5S,” as well as a less-expensive “iPhone 5C,” in the country on Sept. 20 through cellular carriers SoftBank and KDDI.

The rumor has it that Apple will release the two handsets simultaneously on Sept. 20, a date that jibes with a rumor that claimed the company is planning to announce the devices at a special Sept. 10 iPhone event.

In addition to the supposed release date, the publication said Apple will debut a new gold color option for the iPhone 5S, a rumor that has quickly gained traction over the past week.

Apple’s current partner carriers SoftBank and KDDI are expected to have both the iPhone 5S and 5C available on launch, while NTT DoCoMo will once again go without.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Georgia Institute of Technology security researchers prove App Store security flaw via “Jekyll and Hyde” attack

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Date: Tuesday, August 20th, 2013, 07:18
Category: iOS, News, security, Software

The good news is that it’s getting a bit harder to sneak malware into the App Store.

The bad news is that it can still be done and Apple might need to invest in more security/screening features.

Per 9to5Mac and Ars Technica, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology managed to get a malicious app approved by Apple and included in the App Store by using a ‘Jekyll & Hyde’ approach, where the behaviour of a benign app was remotely changed after it had been approved and installed.

It appeared to be a harmless app that Apple reviewers accepted into the iOS App Store. They were later able to update the app to carry out a variety of malicious actions without triggering any security alarms. The app, which the researchers titled “Jekyll,” worked by taking the binary code that had already been digitally signed by Apple and rearranging it in a way that gave it new and malicious behaviors.

The researchers presented their findings in a paper at the USENIX Security Forum.

“Our method allows attackers to reliably hide malicious behavior that would otherwise get their app rejected by the Apple review process. Once the app passes the review and is installed on an end user’s device, it can be instructed to carry out the intended attacks. The key idea is to make the apps remotely exploitable and subsequently introduce malicious control flows by rearranging signed code. Since the new control flows do not exist during the app review process, such apps, namely Jekyll apps, can stay undetected when reviewed and easily obtain Apple’s approval.”

An Apple spokesman stated that changes have been made to iOS as a result of the exploit, but it’s not yet clear whether the change is to iOS 7 or the older iOS 5 and 6 versions that had been attacked. The researchers only left their app in the store for a few minutes and said that it was not downloaded by anyone outside the project in that time.

Apple Senior Vice President Phil Schiller tweeted back in March about a study revealing the rising incidences of malware on Android. The study showed that Android accounted for 79 percent of all mobile malware in 2012, while iOS came in at less than 1 percent.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Waze realtime incident data now incorporated into Google Maps following acquisition earlier this year

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Date: Tuesday, August 20th, 2013, 07:57
Category: iOS, iPad, iPhone, News, Software

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This is one of the better sides of companies buying each other out.

Per AppleInsider, crowd sourced traffic data from Waze, a company that Google acquired earlier this year, is now included in the official Google Maps application for iPhone and iPad.

The company announced on its official Lat Long blog on Tuesday that real time incident reports from Waze users will appear in the official Google Maps apps for both iOS and Android in the U.S. and U.K., as well as France, Germany, Switzerland, Mexico, Brazil, Panama, Peru, Chile, Colombia, and Ecuador.

Google has also updated the Waze app for iOS, as well as Android, to add Google Search functionality. Google’s data now joins other search providers in being integrated into Waze.

Finally, Google also announced that the Waze Map Editor has been updated with Google Street View and satellite imagery. This will make it easier for users in the Waze community to correct map errors. Google announced it had acquired Waze, a crowd-sourced traffic and navigation service, in June.

Google announced in June that it had acquired Waze, a popular cross-platform, crowd-sourced traffic and navigation service to bolster its own Google Maps. As of April, Waze had more than 40 million people actively using its service and contributing data.

The Waze iOS application was highlighted by Apple >last year following the launch of iOS 6, when the company promoted alternative mapping applications and apologized for the substandard quality of its own Maps.

Google, in turn, has been working to greater monetize users of its own mapping software on iOS, as the company rolled out new banner ads for the official Google Maps application earlier this month.

If you’ve seen the realtime incident reporting in action and have any feedback to offer about it, let us know in the comments.

Apple begins graphics card program for designated iMacs, looks to replace faulty AMD Radeon HD 6970M units

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Date: Monday, August 19th, 2013, 07:10
Category: Hardware, iMac, News

Check the manufacturing date on your iMac, it may be eligible for a replacement graphics card.

Per AppleInsider, addressing complaints from owners, Apple has decided to institute a replacement program for graphics cards used in specific 27-inch iMac models sold between May 2011 and October 2012.

According to a document on Apple’s Support webpage, the AMD Radeon HD 6970M video cards shipped with certain 27-inch iMac desktop configurations would fail, causing the display to “appear distorted, white or blue with vertical lines.” In some cases, the screen would simply go black.

Models covered in the replacement program include high-end “mid-2011” 27-inch iMacs with 3.1GHz quad-core Intel Core i5 or 3.4GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 processors. The all-in-ones first hit store shelves in May 2011 and remained on sale until the current ultra thin iMacs debuted in October 2012.

Apple will replace failed video cards free of charge for up to three years after the initial purchase date. In addition, people who may have paid for repair or replacement associated with the issue can seek a refund.

Those affected by the issue can take their iMac in for evaluation at the Genius Bar of a local Apple Store or an Apple Authorized Service Provider. If those services are unavailable, owners are instructed to call Apple Technical Support for other further options.

If you’ve seen this issue on your end, please let us know in the comments.

Rumor: Next-gen iPhone to include gold color, 128GB capacity

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Date: Friday, August 16th, 2013, 07:06
Category: Hardware, iPhone, Rumor

The next-gen iPhone could hold twice as much data as the current model.

And be a classy gold color.

Per AppleInsider, KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo offers his predictions on Apple’s anticipated next-generation iPhone, including a new 128GB storage option and a gold colorway.

Kuo points out in his note investors that the so-called “iPhone 5S,” will carry over many of the features already established with the current iPhone 5, including the 4-inch screen form factor.

The analyst predicts Apple will make the usual processor buff, this time to a new A7 system-on-chip design with 1GB of LPDDR3 RAM. The latest chip is expected to be of Apple’s own design based on the ARMv8 architecture, suggesting efficiency may be increased by up to 20 percent. Because Apple controls both the operating system and hardware for the iPhone 5S, it can optimize the faster LPDDR3 RAM spec for the A7 SoC, keeping the amount of addressable memory to 1GB.

The phone’s rear-facing camera will also be tweaked. While the sensor unit will remain untouched, the iPhone 5S shooter will use a larger f2.0 aperture lens assembly with dual LED flashes.

As for the widely rumored fingerprint sensor, Kuo reiterated the view he expressed in a separate note last week, saying the package will likely be embedded in a sapphire glass home button.

For storage, Kuo expects Apple to add on a new option for a capacious 128GB of on-board flash memory, the same change the company made to the fourth generation iPad in February.

Finally, a new option for a gold casing is expected to be offered alongside the traditional black and, with the iPhone 5, silver colors. Gold parts purportedly bound for the 5S were leaked in June, though an accompanying chassis sporting the new color has yet to surface.

Contrary to some predictions, Kuo doesn’t see Apple implementing near-field communication (NFC) in the iPhone 5S.

Apple is rumored to be prepping for a Sept. 10 iPhone announcement, at which the company is expected to launch the iPhone 5S and possibly a less expensive handset dubbed the “iPhone 5C.”

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Rumor: Apple to release iOS 7 Golden Master to partners, employees on September 5th

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Date: Thursday, August 15th, 2013, 07:47
Category: iOS, Rumor, Software

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Apple’s long-awaited iOS 7 release is getting that much closer to a ship date.

Or at least there’s now a Golden Master date.

According to Boy Genius Report, Apple is preparing to release the final beta release of iOS 7, beta 6, sometime next week followed by a final Gold Master release ahead of Apple’s expected September 10th iPhone event. This time frame would mark two weeks from the release of beta 5, and Apple was on a two week schedule prior to the Developer Center outages. BGR is also claiming that Apple plans to seed a final GM version of the software on September 5th to employees and partners and release it to developers after the event early next month:

“After iOS 7 beta 6, Apple will be seeding a GM (gold master) version for its employees and partners to test starting around September 5th. This will mostly likely be the software that is released to the public later on in the month of September, barring any major bugs or problems that might be discovered… After Apple and its partners are comfortable with the gold master build, the company will release it to developers on September 10th, the day of the company’s iPhone event.”

It’s not hard to predict that a GM is just around the corner, as Apple would clearly want to have it ready for its reported September 10th iPhone event. No specific source has been identified as having provided a specific source of the information, but a release of the final iOS 7 version on September 10th to developers is a given if Apple continues in the tradition of years past.

WebKit adds support for Retina-quality images, changes to be made to HTML5

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Date: Thursday, August 15th, 2013, 06:36
Category: iPad, iPhone, MacBook Pro, News, Software

The images on the Web are about to get snazzier looking.

Per webkit.org, WebKit, the Apple-supported open source project behind Safari, is the first browser layout engine to support a new Web standard that makes it easier for developers to take advantage of high-resolution displays, like the Retina panels found in the iPhone, iPad and MacBook Pro.

The new standard, an addition to the HTML5 specification called “srcset,” provides developers with an easy way to serve users different image versions based on the resolution of their device. For example, a website may serve larger, higher quality images to visitors browsing on a Retina MacBook Pro while sending smaller, lower quality images to visitors on a MacBook Air.

Websites and Web-based applications have been slow to provide support for Retina displays since the screens first appeared on the iPhone 4 in 2010. Current methods for implementation are suboptimal – they can be cumbersome for developers, degrade the user experience, or lack cross-browser support.

Using srcset, developers can specify multiple variations of an image with a single declaration, and it is designed for compatibility with older systems. Browsers that do not support srcset will simply ignore it without any adverse affect on the user.

The syntax is similar to Apple’s iOS conventions for Retina-ready graphics: developers simply provide an alternate filename and a resolution multiplier, e.g. 1x, 2x, or 4x. The “resolution multiplier” is a measure of how many physical pixels make up one display pixel; for example, the iPhone 5 has a physical resolution of 1,136-by-640 pixels, but a display resolution of 568-by-320 pixels. This means there are 4 physical pixels for each display pixel, or a 4x multiplier.

The World Wide Web Consortium, or W3C, the international organization that defines and administers the open standards that underpin the Web, added srcset to the HTML5 specification in May 2012.

A similar feature, called “-webkit-image-set,” was added to WebKit and shipped with Safari 6 and Google’s Chrome 21 in October of the same year. The asset never achieved widespread adoption, however, as it was not implemented in Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Mozilla’s Firefox, which together commanded more than 50% of the international browser market at the time.

WebKit is the first browser engine to announce support for srcset, and the feature is likely to ship in Safari 7 with OS X Mavericks.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.