Google Chrome updated to 24.0.1312.56

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Date: Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013, 07:07
Category: News, Software

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You can’t knock a decent web browser update.

Late Tuesday, Google released version 24.0.1312.56 of its Chrome web browser. The update, a 46.8 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:
- Fixed performance of mouse wheel scrolling. [Issue: 160122]

- Fixed visited links regression. [Issue: 160025]

Google Chrome 24.0.1312.56 requires an Intel-based Mac with Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run. If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Opera demos “Ice” web browser for iOS, Android devices

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Date: Monday, January 21st, 2013, 08:59
Category: iPad, iPhone, News, Software

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It never hurts to have a wider array of web browser choices for your iOS device.

Per Pocket Lint and AppleInsider, Opera Software on Friday unveiled its latest project, a WebKit-based mobile browser called “Opera Ice” that is specifically designed for screen formats seen on popular smartphones and tablets, including the iPhone and iPad.

In an internal video released on Friday, Opera gave a brief look at a beta of the new app, which features an icon-based interface much like the optional homescreens seen on desktop versions of Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome browsers.



According to the developers, the app was designed to hide the usual clutter seen with modern web browsers, including the ubiquitous URL bar, that takes up limited screen real estate on mobile devices. The so-called “full touch browser” does away with buttons and menus to create a spartan user interface driven by screen taps and gestures.

Instead of the Presto rendering engine that Opera has used for years, Ice is based on WebKit, the same engine used by both Apple and Google. The move is meant to keep Opera in the fast-changing mobile market.

“We need to focus on getting strong products out on iOS and Android,” said Opera CEO Lars Boilesen.

As for the company’s current mobile solution, Opera mini, Boilesen said that it won’t be replaced by Ice. Instead, the platform will be leveraged to generate users that will eventually be migrated over to new mobile apps. Opera Ice is expected to debut sometime in February, while a new unannounced desktop browser is slated for a March release.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Google Chrome updated to 24.0.1312.52

Posted by:
Date: Friday, January 11th, 2013, 07:43
Category: News, Software

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If you love Google Chrome, it’s your lucky day.

Late Thursday, Google released version 24.0.1312.52 of its Chrome web browser. The update, a 46.8 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

- [$1000] [162494] High CVE-2012-5145: Use-after-free in SVG layout. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.

- [$4000] [165622] High CVE-2012-5146: Same origin policy bypass with malformed URL. Credit to Erling A Ellingsen and Subodh Iyenger, both of Facebook.

- [$1000] [165864] High CVE-2012-5147: Use-after-free in DOM handling. Credit to José A. Vázquez.

- [167122] Medium CVE-2012-5148: Missing filename sanitization in hyphenation support. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).

- [166795] High CVE-2012-5149: Integer overflow in audio IPC handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).

- [165601] High CVE-2012-5150: Use-after-free when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).

- [165538] High CVE-2012-5151: Integer overflow in PDF JavaScript. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.

- [165430] Medium CVE-2012-5152: Out-of-bounds read when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).

- [164565] High CVE-2012-5153: Out-of-bounds stack access in v8. Credit to Andreas Rossberg of the Chromium development community.

- [Windows only] [164490] Low CVE-2012-5154: Integer overflow in shared memory allocation. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).

- [Mac only] [163208] Medium CVE-2012-5155: Missing Mac sandbox for worker processes. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Julien Tinnes).

- [162778] High CVE-2012-5156: Use-after-free in PDF fields. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.

- [162776] [162156] Medium CVE-2012-5157: Out-of-bounds reads in PDF image handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.

- [162153] High CVE-2013-0828: Bad cast in PDF root handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.

- [162114] High CVE-2013-0829: Corruption of database metadata leading to incorrect file access. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Jüri Aedla).

- [Windows only] [162066] Low CVE-2013-0830: Missing NUL termination in IPC. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).

- [161836] Low CVE-2013-0831: Possible path traversal from extension process. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Tom Sepez).

- [160380] Medium CVE-2013-0832: Use-after-free with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).

- [154485] Medium CVE-2013-0833: Out-of-bounds read with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).

- [154283] Medium CVE-2013-0834: Out-of-bounds read with glyph handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).

- [152921] Low CVE-2013-0835: Browser crash with geolocation. Credit to Arthur Gerkis.

- [150545] High CVE-2013-0836: Crash in v8 garbage collection. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).

- [145363] Medium CVE-2013-0837: Crash in extension tab handling. Credit to Tom Nielsen.

- [Linux only] [143859] Low CVE-2013-0838: Tighten permissions on shared memory segments. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Palmer).

Google Chrome 24.0.1312.52 requires an Intel-based Mac with Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run. If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Google releases Picasa 3.9.13.29 update

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Date: Monday, January 7th, 2013, 06:26
Category: News, Software

On Wednesday, software giant Google released Picasa 3.9.13.29, the latest version of its photo organization program for the Mac. Once installed, Picasa imports (without moving or copying) photos from the iPhoto library as well as other folders and external hard drives on your Mac. The program also includes assorted editing tools for straightening, text generation, red eye removal, collage creation and Photoshop-like effects and adjustments. The new version, a 34 megabyte download, offers the following fixes and changes:

Share to your Google+ circles: If you’ve joined Google+, you can use Picasa 3.9 to share directly to the circles you’ve created in Google+. They’ll see your photos and videos in their Google+ stream. People that don’t use Google+ aren’t left out. They’ll get an email to view your album in Google+, and they don’t have to join to do so.

Picasa name tags on Google+: If you’ve joined Google+, you may have noticed that name tags have become more social. With the release of Picasa 3.9, you can now upload and share your name tags on Google+. Note that if you choose not to join Google+, name tags won’t change at all.

New photo editing effects: We’ve added a plethora of new editing effects like Vignette, Duo-tone, Borders and more.

Side by side editing: Compare two different photos side by side. Or compare the original and edited versions versions of the same photo simultaneously as you apply edits in Picasa. Learn how to edit side by side.

Picasa 3.9.13.29 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.5 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Rumor: Apple in negotiations to purchase Waze map service

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Date: Thursday, January 3rd, 2013, 10:16
Category: iOS, Rumor, Software

When in doubt about your own technologies, maybe it’s time to go shopping.

Per TechCrunch and The Mac Observer, Apple is apparently deep in negotiations to buy the online map service Waze. Sources say the Mac, iPhone and iPad maker is willing to pay upwards of US$500 million for the company, although Waze is said to be holding out for US$750 million.

Waze’s twist on the online map and navigation market is social networking. The company gathers map data through users as they drive, and is seen as generally more accurate than some other online map services since users are contributing information daily. In contrast, Google’s Maps relies primarily on its own cars to gather data and street view photos.

Apple found itself with a marketing black eye after the release of iOS 6 in fall 2012 when it replaced Google’s Maps for its own service — a service that suffered from accuracy issues and missing location data. Apple responded with a public apology and a promise to “throw its weight” behind improving its Maps service.

The company also recently approved Google’s own mapping app for the iPhone, which brought back features missing from Apple’s own app such as public transportation information. With Google Maps available, competition in the navigation space ramped up a little, although Waze is apparently the only navigation app that gained serious traction after Apple released its own Maps app.

Apple also already has a working relationship with Waze since the company is providing some of the location data iOS 6 users rely on.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Hacker cites iOS 6 code as becoming more secure, offering “tougher protections”

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Date: Wednesday, December 26th, 2012, 07:18
Category: iOS, News, security, Software

Hacking an iOS device may be getting tougher to do.

Per iPodNN, in a recent tweet, hacker i0n1c has revealed that the forthcoming iOS 6.1 update adds “again tougher protections” to the codebase even compared to iOS 6, suggesting that security has been dramatically improved.

While many users have perfectly legitimate reasons (beyond just wanting to) for jailbreaking their iOS devices, because the technique relies on finding an exploitable “hole” in the OS code that could also be used for malicious purposes, Apple is naturally very eager to close up avenues by which unofficial or dangerous code could be injected into the device — even though many “unofficial” apps are simply ones that were rejected by Apple for App Store guideline violations, mostly for altering core OS elements.

Closing down jailbreaking loopholes will also close off one of the principle sources of pirated apps, also giving Apple considerable incentive to cut off the practice. Holes in Android code are frequently used to install scamware, malware, privacy-compromising and even virus-ridden apps — a growing problem for Google, though the ability to heavily customize and “root” Android devices is a major selling point to the most technically-proficient of Android’s audience.

The hacker community believes that iOS 6 will eventually get an “untethered” (meaning “persistent through restarts”) jailbreak, but that iOS 6.1 may represent the end of the free jailbreaking road. The security may simply have reached a point where only those likely to sell any remaining exploit secrets are likely to be able to come up with any.

Apple has made security a top priority on iOS, since it is the only platform where malware is all but completely unknown. Many of the security improvements made in iOS have also been transferred to the Mac as applicable, including complete sandboxing of applications and developer “signatures” on apps.

In his tweet, i0n1c refers to a “changing of the guard” that has brought much-improved security to iOS. It’s unknown if this refers to Craig Federighi’s recent promotion to handle both iOS and OS X, or if this is a reference to Kristin Paget, a top white-hat hacker herself who is now listed on LinkedIn as a “Core OS Security Researcher” at Apple.

Stay tuned for additional details as they become available.

Google Earth updated to 7.0.2.8415

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Date: Wednesday, December 19th, 2012, 08:13
Category: News, Software

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On Tuesday, software giant Google released version 7.0.2.8415 of its popular Google Earth program. The new version, a 40.8 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

What’s New:
- We have included substantial performance improvements to this build. You should see scenes load more rapidly than in our previous public Beta release.

- We have included minor tweaks to the Tour Guide UI.

Issues fixed in this release:
- We fixed the bug that prevented users from recording movies from saved tours.

- Wikipedia text displays in tours.

- Gray buildings and extruded polygons have improved lighting effects.

- Imagery holes no longer appear after sun has been turned on in DirectX on certain hardware configurations.

- Icons align correctly upon installation of .dmg.

Known issues in Google Earth 7:
- When run in DirectX mode on certain Radeon graphics cards on Windows, SketchUp models and extruded polygons will appear gray. To work around this issue, run Earth in OpenGL mode.

- When run in OpenGL mode on certain Intel graphics cards, SketchUp models and extruded polygons will appear gray. To work around this issue, run Earth in DirectX mode.

- Clamped Polygons and Image Overlays display multiple instances in 3D cities on certain hardware configurations.

- KML overlays don’t render correctly in 3D cities in DX on certain hardware configurations.

- Water surfaces around coastlines will flicker then resolve upon zoom.

- Placemark and linestring quality diminishes in the Plugin with browser refresh. To workaround, zoom closely into the KML you want to view.

- Terrain and Water Surface oddities exist at the antimeridian.

Google Earth 7.0.2.8415 requires an Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run.

If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, let us know in the comments.

Google Chrome updated to 23.0.1271.101

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Date: Tuesday, December 18th, 2012, 07:22
Category: News, Software

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Hey, an update’s an update.

Late Monday, Google released version 23.0.1271.101 of its Chrome web browser. The update, a 56.5 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

- This build contains the fix to a bug with sound distortion with microphone input: 157613.

Google Chrome 23.0.1271.101 requires an Intel-based Mac with Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run. If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Revised Google Maps app for iOS goes live, now available

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Date: Thursday, December 13th, 2012, 08:29
Category: iOS, iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, News, Software

You’ve been hankering for it and it’s here.

Late Wednesday, Google released the iOS-native version of its Google Maps application. The app, a 6.7 megabyte download via the App Store, adds the following fixes and changes:

Search:
- Find addresses, places and businesses around the world with Google local search.

- Discover places to eat, drink, shop and play, with ratings and local reviews.

- Sign in to sync your searches, directions, and favorite places between your computer and your phone.

Directions:
- Get voice guided, turn-by-turn driving directions.

- Find your way by train, bus, subway or walking directions.

- Access live traffic information in cities across the world.

Street View and imagery:
- View 360-degree panoramas of places around the globe with Street View.

- See inside more than 100,000 businesses worldwide.

- View high resolution satellite imagery of locations around the world.

Simple and easy to use:
- An entirely new Google Maps experience on your iPhone.

- Newly designed and streamlined interface for even easier navigation of your world.

- Use gestures to explore the map and browse results.

Google Maps 1.0 for iOS requires iOS 5.1 or later to install and run. If you’ve tried the new app on your iPhone, iPod touch or iPad and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.

Google Chrome updated to 23.0.1271.97

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Date: Wednesday, December 12th, 2012, 08:05
Category: News, Software

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Hey, an update’s an update.

Late Tuesday, Google released version 23.0.1271.97 of its Chrome web browser. The update, a 56.5 megabyte download, adds the following fixes and changes:

- Some texts in a Website Settings popup are trimmed (Issue: 159156).

- Some plugins stopped working (Issue: 159896).

- Fixed a known crash (Issue:161854).

Google Chrome 23.0.1271.97 requires an Intel-based Mac with Mac OS X 10.6 or later to install and run. If you’ve tried the new version and have any feedback to offer, please let us know in the comments.